Buti [not] Expelled From Mosque – Soldiers enter Kanaker: 8 Killed

Correction: Buti was NOT expelled from a mosque

Scooby said: Dear Josh,

Your title “Buti expelled from mosque” is extremely misleading. The clips that you show are from MONTHS ago, when the protests started to spread to Damascus. They occurred AFTER the Friday prayers were finished and when some people rushed the pulpit shouting anti-government slogans. All of the clips that follow took place in the week following that sermon, back in March.

Dear Joshua, The video with al-Buti is an old one, it dates back to the second Friday of demonstrations (March 25). Al-Buti was not expelled from the mosque, he just fled because he didn’t want to appear as a supporter of the demonstrators (which he’s not, of course). His comments on the demonstrators “who do not know how to pray” was broadcasted on TV before the Friday sermon on March 25 (either Thursday 24 or Friday morning). He was commenting on the first demonstration in the Umayyad Mosque on Friday March 18. Best, Thomas

Thomas Pierret writes:

Dear Joshua, The video with al-Buti is an old one, it dates back to the second Friday of demonstrations (March 25). Al-Buti was not expelled from the mosque, he just fled because he didn’t want to appear as a supporter of the demonstrators (which he’s not, of course).

His comments on the demonstrators “who do not know how to pray” was broadcasted on TV before the Friday sermon on March 25 (either Thursday 24 or Friday morning). He was commenting on the first demonstration in the Umayyad Mosque on Friday March 18. Best, Thomas

Dear Scooby and Thomas, many thanks for this correction. I was duped by this well crafted video forgery below. There are many misleading and falsified videos going around. I have frequently criticized the main stream press for not doing due diligence. Now I have been burned. Mea culpa. I have frequently used Buti as a measure of the “Sunni street.” He is a much respected Imam. I know he has many critics today because of his pro-stability stand, but for him to be expelled from a mosque would be big news and a turning point, of a kind. Thanks for correcting me. I count on the collective knowledge of this discussion board. Merci]

al-Buti – Syria’s senior Sunni cleric – was ejected from his mosque for speaking out against the uprising. He said: “Most of the people who come to Friday prayers and then go out to demonstrate, do not know how to pray.”

Syria forces kill eight in Kanaker raid – rights groups – BBCSyrian security forces have killed at least eight people in a raid on the town of Kanaker near the capital, Damascus, rights groups say…. The head of the opposition National Organisation for Human Rights (NOHR), Ammar Qurabi, said the dawn operation had also resulted in some 250 arrests.

International journalists have been denied access to Syria, so the BBC is unable to verify reports. Government forces are said to be intensifying their campaign ahead of Ramadan, when the opposition says it will launch daily demonstrations against the government. The BBC’s Owen Bennett-Jones in neighbouring Lebanon says events such as those in Kanaker are no longer unusual…


This is video of a few tanks and soldiers entering the town of Kanaker according to activists. On the tape they call the soldiers dogs and state, “They are liberating the Golan.”

Analysis: Syria faces slide into sectarian mayhem
By Samia Nakhoul | Reuter

LONDON (Reuters) – The popular upheaval in Syria is growing bolder and the cracks in the establishment are getting deeper — yet there is a long and bloody road ahead if protesters are to unseat President Bashar al-Assad and end his family’s 40 years in power.

The price of stalemate is rising daily: sectarian mayhem, a growing protest movement and a faltering economy, with no sign that Bashar and his minority Alawite clan are considering an exit strategy after four decades in power.

Yet so far, there is no sign of a tipping point that would assure success for protesters, as in Tunisia and Egypt, where millions took to the streets to topple autocratic leaders.

“The situation has not reached a critical mass,” said Patrick Seale, biographer of Bashar’s father, Hafez al-Assad.

“Damascus hasn’t risen, the security services haven’t split yet, the economy hasn’t collapsed. The regime looks weak and the opposition looks weaker,” he said…..

Syria in the throes of religious war,
By Hassan Hanizadeh 26 July 2011

The barbaric massacre of three Syrian families from the Alawi tribe in the city of Homs, 165 kilometers to the north of Damascus, shows that the demonstrations against the Assad government has been derailed from its legal and legitimate course.

These three Alawi families, who had no political affiliation whatsoever to the Syrian government, were killed in the most callous manner by the Salafis of the city of Homs.

Following the incident, some of the Alawis outraged by the murder attacked the Sunni mosques of the city, causing clashes with the Salafis.

The slaying of the three families also triggered a wave of resentment and enmity among the Shiites and Alawis against the inhumane acts of the Syrian Salafis so much so that it is feared that a religious civil war might engulf Syria.

Syria’s Alawis, which constitute 15 percent of the country’s 25-million population, never had any role in the country’s power structure prior to the 1970 coup de tat, staged by Hafez Assad.

This community, subsumed under the Shiite faith, has always been subjected to the Salafis’ harassment and abuse. A great number of them fearing Salafis’ night raids were forced to migrate to the heights of Jabal Horan in Southern Syria during the Ottoman rule.

The coup mounted by Hafez Assad, Syria’s former Prime Minister, introduced the Alawis into the power structure; they, however, never sought revenge against the Salafis.

Syria’s cabinet endorses general election bill – China News

DAMASCUS, July 26 (Xinhua) — The Syrian cabinet endorsed late Tuesday the general elections bill as part of the government’s reform program to tamp down more than four months of unrest that swept the country since mid-March.

The endorsement came during a session chaired by Syrian Prime Minister Adel Safar.

The bill aims to regulate the election of parliament and local council members and to ensure the integrity of the electoral process. It also stipulates the formation of the Supreme Commission for Elections to manage the election process.

The move, announced by the official SANA news agency, came two days after the government endorsed a multi-party bill that would allow a political pluralism in the country under the rule of the Baath party for 40 years.

The bill still needs endorsing by the parliament which is scheduled to convene on Aug. 7, before being enacted as a law in a presidential decree, the report said.

From Sana

The Supreme Commission for Elections is made up of five judges and enjoys full independence. Judicial sub-committees will be formed in each province, which will be affiliated to the Higher Committee and work under its supervision….

Minister of Local Administration Omar Ibrahim Ghalawanji said the law included 71 articles and the most important amendment stipulates for transferring the supervision of elections from the administrative authority to the juridical authority.He indicated that the elections in Syria were always monitored by the Interior Ministry while the Ministry of Local Administration was responsible for supervising the local council elections.

The Minister added that the draft law provides for forming the Higher Committee for Elections, in addition to forming juridical sub-committees in the provinces and each sub-committee includes three judges to supervise the eprocess at the electoral centers.

Minister Ghalawanji said the draft law stipulates for establishing electoral centers in the provinces and cities whose population exceed 100,000, in addition to allowing those who got the Syrian citizenship by the Legislative Decree No. 49 to vote and run for the local council membership.

The draft law allows all the will-be-formed parties according to the new political parties law to present their candidates individually or in collective lists, the Minister added.

He said the elections will be conducted publicly, honestly and neutrally in secret rooms and there will be electoral committees to monitor the elections and candidacy committees to receive and examine the candidates’ applications.

Minister of Justice Judge Tayseer Qala Awwad said the law included new articles on prosecuting manipulation of the electoral process.

The new law requires taht the ministries of Justice, Interior and Local Administration to work on automating the elections.

Minister Qala Awwad added that the new law follows the open-list electoral system,

Israeli President: Syrian leader Assad Must Step Down,  July 26, 2011

JERUSALEM – Syrian leader Bashar Assad must step down, Israel’s president declared Tuesday, sending his message to Israel’s neighbor at an unprecedented news conference with Arab media.

Israel’s government has largely kept quiet as anti-government protests swept the Arab world in recent months. While some Israeli officials have predicted the Assad regime will fall, President Shimon Peres’ comments marked the first time an Israeli leader has openly called for the end of the Syrian regime.

Meaningful Political Dialogue Can Only Take Place with an Accounting of the Deaths and Disappearances
Raja AbdulKarim, 25 July 2011
For Syria Comment

Unless the Government Carries Serious Inquiries into the Hundreds of Deaths, Arrest and Cases of Torture, no Meaningful Political Dialogue Can Take Place in Syria

The Syrian Government cannot expect to see its political reform steps taken seriously – supposing it genuinely wishes to reform – when it fails to carry any serious and independent inquiry into the hundreds of deaths, arrests and cases of torture reported by political activists in the last four and a half months.

One of these recent cases is that of Shadi Abou Fakhr, a young cinema producer, who “disappeared” last week while walking in the central area of Shaalan in Damascus and whose case is widely reported and circulation on Facebook and other social media websites.

The author of these lines knows well Shadi. He is probably one of the most brilliant Syrians of his generation. In a recent discussion with him, this young man in his early thirties talked extensively of how he and many men and women of his generations saw the future of their country. Shadi talked of citizenship, of a secular state, of the rule of law. He also talked of his hope that when Syria would get over its revolution it would set an example for neighbouring Lebanon and Iraq that remain plagued by sectarianism.

Of course this sounds very idealistic; but can revolutions be carried without such idealism?

Shadi is no Salafist – he is a Druze; he is not pursing the agenda of any foreign country – he never lived abroad and speaks no foreign language; and he is a pacifist.

In spite of all this he has been arrested, as thousands of his countrymen, in a country whose Government prides itself in the security it supposedly provides to its population; a Government that obviously does not consider in any way that it is its responsibility to carry an independent and serious inquiry in all these cases.

For weeks the Syrian Government and many of his supporters have been putting blame on the opposition for refusing a dialogue; “those who put conditions for dialogue refuse dialogue,” the Government says.

Of course no one must be fooled. Even if some segments of the Syrian opposition refuses dialogue, large segments of it do want it but at a certain number of conditions: the withdrawal of the security services from the street and the end of the shootings on demonstrators; the liberation of the thousands of political prisoners; and the enabling of peaceful demonstrations to take place.

As a matter of principle, putting conditions for dialogue is not in itself a refusal of a dialogue per se, and the Syrian Government knows that better than anyone else. Doesn’t it put a condition of its own for negotiating with the Israeli Government, i.e. the recognition of Syria’s sovereignty on the whole of the Golan Heights? The vast majority of the Syrian population does, actually, support its Government in that stand.

It is necessary to understand at this stage that as long as no serious efforts are made to force the Syrian authorities to carry independent and serious inquiries into all the deaths and arrests that have occurred in the last few months, the Government’s reform claims cannot be taken for serious and no meaningful political dialogue can take place.

Syrians on all sides of the political spectrum need to know what happened to the 1,500 people that the opposition claims have died since the beginning of the unrest; they need to know where are and what happened to the 15,000 or so, including Shadi Abou Fakhr, that have disappeared; why no independent media is allowed into the country; and, in case we get no answer for that, why doesn’t Syrian state TV provide live broadcast of the hundreds of demonstrations that take place every week across the country in the same way that it covers the pro-Government demonstrations.

Many continue to believe the Government’s story of armed gangs and Salafists disrupting the efforts for political reforms and killing civilians across the country. These people, as much as the opposition, have an interest in the Government carrying, with the help of the families of the victims, a transparent and serious inquiry on the arrest, disappearances and deaths of every single one of the country’s sons and daughters.

WSJ [Reg]: Iran Redistributes Wealth in Bid to Fight Sanctions
2011-07-27

TEHRAN—Iran’s Islamist government may be public enemy No. 1 at the White House. But in the halls of the International Monetary Fund a few blocks away, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is being hailed as an economic reformer. In the face of mounting international sanctions, his government has embraced over the past seven months what the IMF calls one of the boldest economic makeovers ever attempted in the oil-rich Middle East.

Tehran has cut price subsidies on most energy and food products since December in a bid to shave about $60 billion or more off the government’s expenses annually. The move has …

Please be more scrupulous in what you are presenting and how it is being read.

Comments (186)


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51. some guy in damascus said:

ummm none of you guys paid any attention to what Raja AbdulKarim said????
seriously?!?!?!
the biggest mistake the regime has made so far is their lack of accountability, precisely Bashar. the little accountability that was taken was aimed at the man ( gorilla) they authorities set on the street.
any trust building measure has to consist of accountability. IF JUNIOR REALLY WANTS TO MAKE CHANGE HE MIGHT AS WELL GO ANNOUNCE THE MISTAKES HE MADE AND APOLOGIZE. that will be a first step and trust me it will also be a truly historic speech. i have no hope in him, or those around him..he is dragging us to hell with him.

in Norway, the government announced around 76 people were murdered. they got 2 minutes of silence and a day of mourning.
in Syria, the government announced around 350 people were murdered. they got 2 dozen artists and days of celebrating.

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July 28th, 2011, 4:04 am

 

52. SYR.Expat said:

“In Syria moderation is vanishing rapidly, The extremists are taking over, no matter what the government does, i see no chance of positive respond from the opposition their moderates are afraid of their extremists, The question is how long will the government and the president take to recognize that they have no partner in planning the secular future of Syria . i don’t know but i am frustrated and depressed.”

Amazing comment. The poor president and his fascist government (talk about extremism) “have no partner in planning the secular future of Syria.” The Baathists who got us to where we are today (and caused people like the writer of the comment above to leave Syria) are unable to reform.

All the Baathists want to do is buy time and introduce cosmetic changes, while ensuring that they remain in power. The the Baathists are the extremists here.

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July 28th, 2011, 4:05 am

 

53. Aboud said:

I just love it when the menhebaks keep repeating the “secular” line, over and over again.

Which president closed down the country’s only casino? Which president repealed the laws banning full face niqabs in government departments? And which president’s closest ally is the most oppressive theocracy in the region?

You won’t hear any of the mnehebaks criticize Iranian theocracy, as long as the ayatollahs keep the support and money flowing to junior.

And FYI, the Baathist religion of worshiping the holy trinity of Papa Assad (the father), the son (junior) and the holy ghost (Basel, may he rest in pieces), is far, far more oppressive than anything in Saudi Arabia. In Saudi, the worst that can happen if you don’t go to a mosque is harassment by the religious police. But in Syria, not attending a menhebak rally will get you fired, imprisoned and tortured.

The supposedly “western” educated Baathists on this forum apparently lack the critical thinking and objectivity to see that Baathism has merely replaced one religion with another. And as far as ideologies go, Baathist has proven a distinct failure.

Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 14 Thumb down 42

July 28th, 2011, 4:55 am

 

54. SYR.Expat said:

46. LOUAI

Thank you for your question.

“if possible can you share with us your openion as why all the media lately attacking Dr.Al Buti? thanks”

Criticism of Sh. Bouti is coming from different places, including:

- Saudi-financed media. One thing for sure, wahabis/salafis don’t like Sh. Bouti. They now see an opportunity to destroy his reputation and they are ceasing it (the opportunity).

Sh. Bouti has played a great role in protecting Syria from the wahabi influence and it’s now payback time. In doing so, they’re hitting two birds with one stone.

First, they settle the score with him. Second, by discrediting him and other pro-regime scholars, they stand a better chance to spread their ideology through the likes of ‘arour. I hope they fail.

The vast majority of Sunni Syrians are not wahabis/salafis and remain so despite the many attempts made over the past 50+ years. However, when people see their scholars siding with the government against them, it’s easier for ‘arour and company to exploit the situation and gain more influence.

- Other media/blogs. They repeat what the Saudi-financed media circulates without verification (not an excuse). Sometimes, it’s cut-and-paste. Other times, it is a misunderstanding of Sh. Bouti’s opinions. However, there is also genuine discontent with no misrepresentation.

- Disillusioned students and supports/fans of the shaikh. Many of the shaikh’s students and supporters/fans have been critical of shaikh Bouti’s attack on the opposition. Those students and supports/fans are well intentioned and have valid reasons for their criticism.

- Syria’s Ulema. Many of the ulema/scholars of Damascus and Syria have been very critical of sh. Bouti. Many cannot openly voice their criticism because of the security ramifications. Those who did by criticizing the government and offering a different opinion than the one expressed by Sh. Bouti have been banned from public speaking.

I hope this helps.

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July 28th, 2011, 4:57 am

 

55. SYR.Expat said:

One of the big losers of the events in Syria regardless of the outcome is Iran. I will also add Hizbullah. After 2006, the popularity of Hizbullah sky-rocketed in Syria. Now, among Syria’s Sunnis, Hizbullah’s popularity has almost disappeared. By not being neutral and siding with the Syrian government against the demonstrators while at the same time whining over the treatment of protesters in Bahrain, Hizbullah pretty much lost the trust of many people in Syria. The same applies to Iran.

The vast majority of the people in the Arab World are fed up with authoritarianism and want to control their destiny. The people in Bahrain have every right to demand a better government and so do the people of Syria. Those who side against the people’s legitimate demands will eventually lose.

نظرة سلبية تجاه إيران لدى غالبية العرب باستثناء لبنان
الكاتب (ا ف ب)
الأربعاء, 27 يوليو 2011 19:06

أظهر استطلاع أجراه الباحث جيمس زغبي رئيس المعهد العربي الأمريكي وجود نظرة سلبية ومخاوف تجاه إيران منتشرة بشكل واسع النطاق بين العرب، مع استثناء وحيد هو لبنان على خلفية تركيبته الطائفية والسياسية.
وشمل الاستطلاع الذي اجري في حزيران/ يونيو الماضي أكثر من أربعة آلاف عربي في كل من المغرب ومصر والسعودية ولبنان والأردن اضافة إلى الامارات حيث شمل الاستطلاع العرب الوافدين ايضا، لكنه لم يشمل دولا بارزة على
تماس مع الدور الايراني مثل سوريا والبحرين.

وأظهر الاستطلاع الذي حصلت وكالة فرانس برس على نسخة من نتائجه، ان 89% ممن شملهم في الامارات يرون ان الدور الايراني سلبي في العراق وسلبي في البحرين (82%) وسلبي في الخليج عموما (83%)، فيما اعتبر 100% ممن شملهم الاستطلاع في السعودية ان الدور الايراني سلبي في البحرين، وكانت النسبة 81% بالنسبة للتاثير الايراني في العراق، و84% لهذا التاثير في الخليج.

ورأى 61% ممن شملهم الاستطلاع في مصر أن الدور الايراني سلبي في العراق.

الا ان 70% من اللبنانيين المشمولين في الاستطلاع يرون أن الدور الايراني ايجابي في بلدهم فيما اشارت نسبة قليلة من المشمولين في الاستطلاع الى دور ايراني سلبي في دول عربية اخرى.

ويرى 89% من الشيعة اللبنانيين المشمولين في الاستطلاع أن الدور الايراني ايجابي في بلادهم، مقابل 53% في صفوف السنة، 64% في صفوف المسيحيين.

لكن اللبنانيين يؤيدون بدرجة اقل بكثير الدور الايراني في مناطق عربية اخرى.

وفي الادرن كانت الآراء إزاء سلبية التأثير الايراني أقل حدة من دول الخليج ومصر والمغرب.

واظهر الاستطلاع تراجعا عاما في النظرة الايجابية تجاه إيران بشكل تدريجي منذ العام 2006.

وبحسب الاستطلاع، حلت تركيا في طليعة القوى الاقليمية والدولية التي ينظر الرأي العام العربي اليها نظرة ايجابية. وبلغت نسبة الاراء الايجابية ازاء تركيا 80% في المغرب، وفي مصر 64%، وفي لبنان 93%، وفي السعودية 98%، وفي الامارات 62%، الا ان النسبة لم تتجاوز 45% في الاردن.

وبلغت نسبة الاراء العربية الايجابية في الولايات المتحدة مستوى متدنيا جدا مقارنة بتركيا والصين وفرنسا، كما ان ايران حصلت بالرغم من النظرة السلبية لها، على اراء ايجابية اكثر من الولايات المتحدة في جميع الدول التي شملها الاستطلاع عدا في السعودية حيث ابدى 30% من المستطلعين رأيا ايجابيا تجاه الولايات المتحدة مقابل 6% فقط تجاه إيران.

وفي لبنان أظهر الاستطلاع ان نسبة تفوق 90% لدى جميع الطوائف لديها رأي ايجابي في تركيا، ورأي سلبي في الولايات المتحدة بنسبة تفوق 70% لدى جميع الطوائف، بما في ذلك لدى المسيحيين (78%).

كما اظهر الاستطلاع ان لدى المسيحيين اللبنانيين المشمولين بالاستطلاع رأي سلبي في فرنسا بنسبة 54%، وبالرغم من العلاقات التاريخية والثقافية الوثيقة مع فرنسا التي كانت تسمى بـ(الام الحنون) للبنانيين الموارنة.

ورأى 88% من الأردنيين أن الشرق الاوسط سيكون في امان اكثر اذا كان منطقة خالية من السلاح النووي، فيما رأى 39% من اللبنانيين ان الامن في المنطقة سيكون في وضع افضل اذا ما حصلت إيران على السلاح النووي.

وأكدت غالبية المستطلعين في جميع الدول رفضها حصول ايران على السلاح النووي لكن المستطلعين اختاروا بغالبيتهم مصر عندما طلب منهم تسمية دولة واحدة في المنطقة لتحصل على السلاح النووي الى جانب إسرائيل.

واعتبر جميع المستطلعين في السعودية ان ارسال قوات درع الجزيرة الى البحرين يتماشى من واجب دول مجلس التعاون الخليجي تجاه دولة عضو، وشاطر هذا الراي نصف المستطلعين المغربيين و67% من المستطلعين في مصر و37% في الاردن و39% في الامارات و38% في لبنان.

ويبلغ هامش الخطأ في الاستطلاع حوالى 3,5% في المغرب ومصر والسعودية، و4,5% في لبنان والاردن والامارات.

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July 28th, 2011, 5:17 am

 

56. SYR.Expat said:

Ibrahim Qashoush, Syria Protest Songwriter, Gruesomely Killed

By BASSEM MROUE 07/27/11 02:51 PM ET
React
BEIRUT — Ibrahim Qashoush’s lyrics moved thousands of protesters in Syria who sang his jaunty verses at rallies, telling President Bashar Assad, “Time to leave.” So when his body was dumped in the river flowing through his hometown, his killers added an obvious message: His throat was carved out.

Qashoush’s slaying underlines how brutal Syria’s turmoil has become as authorities try to crush a persistent uprising. His fellow activists are convinced he was killed by security forces and fear it could mark a new campaign to liquidate protest leaders.

An estimated 1,600 civilians have died in the crackdown on the largely peaceful protests that have been raging around Syria for more than four months, most from shootings by troops on anti-Bashar rallies. Qashoush’s case was a rare, targeted killing of a prominent activist – made more chilling by the clear intention to send a bloody message.

The 42-year-old Qashoush, a father of three boys, was a fireman in the central Syrian city of Hama who wrote poetry in his spare time, said a close friend, Saleh Abu Yaman. Before the uprising began in mid-March, he’d write about love or hard economic times.

“All the poems and songs he wrote were by instinct. He used to be sitting with his friends and then start reciting a poem,” Abu Yaman said.

But once the protests erupted and spread, Qashoush turned his pen to the uprising. Hama became one of the hottest centers of the demonstrations. In early June, security forces shot dead 65 people there, and since than it has fallen out of government control, with protesters holding the streets and government forces ringing it, conducting overnight raids into the city.

The hometown son’s star rose with the city. At nearly every protest, the crowds were singing his most popular lyric, “Come on, Bashar, time to leave.” It was put to a bouncy tune, and his poems rang with a down-to-earth, jokey

“Screw you, Bashar, and screw those who salute you. Come on, Bashar, time to leave!” hundreds of thousands sang behind a singer on stage in Hama’s central Assi Square during a rally at the beginning of the month. “Freedom is at our doors. Come on, Bashar, time to leave!”

Two days later, on July 3, Qashoush disappeared.

Abu Yaman says he was told by witnesses that Qashoush was walking to work in central Hama when a white vehicle stopped, several men jumped out and muscled him into the car. They then sped away.

“We immediately knew he was captured by security agents,” Abu Yaman told The Associated Press.

Early the next day, residents found his body in the Orontes River, which cuts through Hama. His throat had been cut away. YouTube footage of his body shows him being put on a bed, his head flopping loosely to show a gaping, bloody wound on the front of his neck where his throat used to be.

“This is a purely criminal act,” said Omar Idilbi, a spokesman for the Local Coordination Committees, which track the protests in Syria. “They executed him.”

Repeated calls to Qashoush’s home by the AP were unanswered over the past days. It is nearly impossible to independently verify the claims on either side of the conflict in Syria, where the government has banned most foreign journalists and restricts coverage by reporters inside the country.

Since the uprising began, there have been several cases of protesters being detained by security force, only to have their bodies handed over later to their families, often with brutal marks of torture. Among them were two boys detained during protests in the southern province of Daraa in April. The body of one, 15-year-old Tamer Mohammed al-Sharei, was bruised, his teeth broken in; the other, 13-year-old Hamza al-Khatib, had a gaping wound in his skull, a broken neck and was mutilated – his penis severed.

But Qashoush’s case appeared distinct. Many prominent activists have been arrested, but there have been few instances of them being swiftly killed and dumped in a way so overtly intended to send a message.

Idilbi said he fears it could signal a new tactic of targeting protest organizers. The singer who sang Qashoush’s song has gone into hiding, activists say.

Like the two slain boys, Qashoush has since become a rallying point for protesters. Thousands attended his funeral on July 4, at Hama’s northern cemetery of Hamra was attended of thousands of Hama’s residents. Crowds have sung his songs at protests since. A video posted on a Facebook page dedicated to Qashoush proclaims, “They killed him in order to silence him. They don’t know that he lives in the hearts of millions.”

“He was the nightingale of the revolution,” Abu Yaman said.

___

Array

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July 28th, 2011, 5:37 am

 

57. MNA said:

SYRIA.EXPAT @ 53

“One of the big losers of the events in Syria regardless of the outcome is Iran. I will also add Hizbullah. After 2006, the popularity of Hizbullah sky-rocketed in Syria. Now, among Syria’s Sunnis, Hizbullah’s popularity has almost disappeared. By not being neutral and siding with the Syrian government against the demonstrators while at the same time whining over the treatment of protesters in Bahrain, Hizbullah pretty much lost the trust of many people in Syria. The same applies to Iran.”

Not exactly SYRIA.EXPAT!
Slogans against both HA and Iran as well as stories of pursian speaking shabiha killing and snipping people were heard at the very first demonstrations in Dar3a before Iran and HA uttered any word of support of the regime.

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July 28th, 2011, 5:48 am

 

58. MNA said:

Aboud @ 51

” holy ghost (Basel, may he rest in pieces)”

Statements like this one really does disservice to your casuse as it only shows a revengeful element. After all, the goal should be what is best for Syria and not what is worst for the regime.

Trying to defend the evil of all evils, KSA, makes your argument looses all creadibility.

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July 28th, 2011, 6:01 am

 

59. some guy in damascus said:

@ MNA 56
i totally agree with you, and we want whats best for syria and not whats the worst for the regime, but i want to see justice. im pretty angry that the taxes i spend go to security forces whos priorites are the defense of the higher “echelon” and not the people. MNA you must realize that the official mouth piece of the regime has tagged much worse labels( the biggest one being that protesters are vandals and linking them to many foreign agendas). i know 2 wrongs dont make a right. but what aboud is trying to portray is a rejection of the asad culture the regime tried to install in our brains. all through highschool i had to chant those stupid slogans revering the baath, i also had to memorize seniors words( like some god). so please dont be surprised when victims of the regime reject it’s ideology( idolizing the asad family)

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July 28th, 2011, 6:21 am

 

60. louai said:

Dear SYR.EXPAT @52

thank you very much for your honest and objective and detailed answer ,it helped indeed .cheers

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July 28th, 2011, 6:35 am

 

61. Aboud said:

MNA @56 “Defending Saudi”? There is a difference between “defending” and “comparing”. The menhebaks here love to bash Saudi Arabia. I spent some years there, and have no desire to go back.

But I don’t miss an opportunity to point out how Baathism is similar to, and in some cases exceeds the excesses, of the Wahabi state. In both cases, unquestioning loyalty and belief in the state’s theology is mandatory from every citizen. Baathism elevates the Assad family to a degree of reverence not accorded to the prophets.

And yet Saudi Arabia has not been known to torture kids to death. Hand cutting for stealing is barbaric, but what do you call the routine torture visited on prisoners, no matter how petty the crime they are incarcerated for.

Get picked up for stealing a car, and you’ll spend months getting whipped, subjected to electric shocks, and crowded in a room not fit for humans. So imagine what they do to prisoners of conscious.

As for Basel, maybe if his absurd portrait (complete with sunglasses) wasn’t also shoved down our throats, we could be indifferent to him. As it is, even in death, he is part and parcel of the Baathist cult.

Hot debate. What do you think? Thumb up 13 Thumb down 37

July 28th, 2011, 6:39 am

 

62. hsyrian said:

At last some good news from Deraa

Jul 28, 2011

DARAA, (SANA) – A 75 year-old man from Daraa Province has got a baccalaureate (High School Certificate) in the literary branch, for the term 2011 with a total grade average of 179 out of 280.

Awad Aliyan said that his love for knowledge made him keep on applying for the baccalaureate exams over several years until he made it, pointing out that he would like to study either History or Arabic Literature at university.

Awad, a father of 13 and a grandfather of 30, got the Elementary School Certificate in 1951 and the Preparatory School Certificate in 1987.

http://www.sana.sy/eng/21/2011/07/28/360951.htm

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July 28th, 2011, 6:47 am

 

63. syau said:

Aboud #51,

“But in Syria, not attending a menhebak rally will get you fired, imprisoned and tortured.”

Some of my family members were unable to attend the rallies in support of President Assad in Syria, interesting enough, they all still have their jobs, and no one has been jailed or tortured.

As for Saudi Arabia, a few questions regarding the country you are ‘comparing’ Syria to, has Sharia law been abolished, are women able to drive or be seen in public, eg. shopping centres without a male chaperone, what would happen to someone if he/she is caught drinking alcohol? I also wonder if there are any casinos built in KSA or another thing that comes to mind, can an unveiled women go out in public without being ridiculed?

Sharia law… I wonder how many citizens have lost fingers or limbs, maybe an ear courtesy of KSA’s idea of upholding the law. An ancient law where the person imposing Sharia law has to be totally sin free. And, in Saudi Arabia, where they practise and uphold this law, women and children would not be spared, so lets us not compare shall we.

Q: Who is drafting an anti-terror law that will brand political dissent an act of terror?
A: The Saudi royals.
KSA, The country you are ‘comparing’ Syria to, where a violation of this law could land you the death penalty, a little harsh don’t you think?
KSA, where criticising the king would land you no less than 10 years jail. I also hear that it’s no walk in the park in a Saudi jail, that’s if they leave you with both legs to walk with.
Great country, great laws they are drafting.

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July 28th, 2011, 7:14 am

 

64. MNA said:

SOME GUY IN DAMASCUS @ 57

“I totally agree with you, and we want whats best for syria and not whats the worst for the regime, but i want to see justice.”

“Wanting justice” has no time limit and is a double-edged sword. Unjustices and autrocities in Syria are not limited to the past 48 years of our history. All different injustices and autrocities were committed to all different religions, sects and ethnicities throughout our history. So if we want justice we have to be open minded to open lots of cans of worms.

Where do you stop if you want justice for the last events, for example?
Would you be satisfied to stop at the first level or two of the the people who were giving orders and you excempt the people who carried on the orders? If we were to assume that the regime was behind the killing and torturing of Hamza, would we be prepared to let the people who carried on the killing and torture go free and just put on trial the chiefs that gave the orders. Or if we assume that the three guys of a certain sect in Homs who were kidnapped, tortured, killed and then cut into pieces were done so by some elements of the “revolution” Would we be ready to demand justice for these guys as well? and if so who should be brought to justice and where do we stop?

And if we decide to dig deeper and bring to justice all who ordered and carried on the orders and by cheer numbers of individials of one sect/ region being employed in certain areas of the gov/ security , a sect/ region may feel targeted, and then what?

We might find our selves in a situation where an oppressed group of a certain time were the oppressors in another time, and then what? For example, it is known that Dar3a and its people had very prominnent positions in the security agencies, al-Baath party, Army, and governemnt under the current regime and as such some or many, who may have been victims themselves or their relatives of the regime during the last events, may have committed or involved in horible crimes when they were the opressors prior to Mar 18, and then what?

These are all thorny and hard questions to answer and there are no simple and straight answer. We should be aware of the consequences.

“so please dont be surprised when victims of the regime reject it’s ideology( idolizing the asad family)”

I m not surprised at all, but how a statement like this ” holy ghost (Basel, may he rest in pieces)” or defending KSA helps their casue or discussion.

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July 28th, 2011, 7:30 am

 

65. MNA said:

About @ 61

I stated what I wanted to state on this and have nothing to add.

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July 28th, 2011, 7:40 am

 

66. some guy in damascus said:

the famous syrian proverb: الخط الأعوج من التيس الكبير
is good enough for me. im convinced most of the security apparatus believes theyre targeting the tools of a foreign agenda. they just follow orders and dont do any thinking. those who give orders must be punished, those who torture( not restrain) must be punished. the syria coming out of this revolution must be a syria where torturing prisoners is illegal.
im no lawyer but i must repeat: juniors biggest failiure is his lack of accountability…HE MUST ADMIT HE MADE MISTAKES.

lets not fall into the same mistake the west has with the jews and say ” cuz u guys were persecuted by hitler, we will give zionists some leeway so you can commit atrocities”. i do not support any revenge agendas. the next syria i want to see is a syria where theres equal opportunity for all regardless of religion/sect/age/sex/proffesion/ party affiliation. where alawis,christians,muslims and even atheists can 1 day say: i dont agree with your policies, and i think they will hurt syria. and no one will be harmed for saying so.
can bashar make such a syria?NO

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July 28th, 2011, 7:56 am

 

67. Aboud said:

@65 MNA

“I stated what I wanted to state on this and have nothing to add.”

And yet in the post before that you state

“or defending KSA helps their casue or discussion. ”

See, you made two mistakes. The first was to throw out a retort just before stating you aren’t interested in further discussing the topic. The second, was the usual Baathist habit of ignoring what the other person actually said. Here, I’ll repeat it for you;

Pony Tail Aboud @61

“MNA @56 “Defending Saudi”? There is a difference between “defending” and “comparing”. The menhebaks here love to bash Saudi Arabia. I spent some years there, and have no desire to go back.

But I don’t miss an opportunity to point out how Baathism is similar to, and in some cases exceeds the excesses, of the Wahabi state.”

And let’s take a look at this;

“KSA, where criticising the king would land you no less than 10 years jail. I also hear that it’s no walk in the park in a Saudi jail, that’s if they leave you with both legs to walk with.”

Wow, just ten years in jail? Hamza Khatib should have been so lucky. But I guess that’s the Baathist judicial system. Hani Jundi was assassinated in the streets.

Daily Star: Syrian Activists Allege Political Asssasination.

http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2011/Jul-27/Syria-activists-allegepolitical-assassinations.ashx

“Some of my family members were unable to attend the rallies in support of President Assad in Syria, interesting enough, they all still have their jobs, and no one has been jailed or tortured. ”

You know, I’m getting increasingly weary of the Baathists here who supposedly have truckloads of relatives in Syria, and yet who are oblivious to the most basic facts of living here. The only thing that could have gotten anyone out of those orchestrated menhebak demos was a real serious note from their doctor.

In Homs, they bussed in people from the villages surrounding Telkelakh. You have not seen ridiculous until you’ve been asked by a guy in full menhebak attire (Besho picture on shirt, Besho picture in hand, and Baath party cap on head) ask you the way to the friggin Deblan street.

FYI, Deblan is the main commercial street in the city. What kind of a Homsi doesn’t know where it is? Someone who…duh…isn’t from Homs. What unlucky creatures, not to be from Homs. I pity the rest of mankind :)

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July 28th, 2011, 9:05 am

 

68. Akbar Palace said:

Thought Control

but what aboud is trying to portray is a rejection of the asad culture the regime tried to install in our brains. all through highschool i had to chant those stupid slogans revering the baath, i also had to memorize seniors words( like some god).

Some Guy in Damascus,

I wonder if any of those “slogans” include anti-zionism?

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July 28th, 2011, 9:30 am

 

69. Abu Umar said:

” 103. mjabali said:

Mr. Abu Umar comment#81

Thanks mr. Abu Umar for admitting your thuggish behavior. You can not escape your threatening words and calls for violence so you try to blame your thuggish behavior on others: that is childish as you know.”

I have never seen you once describe the Syrian regime’s slaughter, disappearing, jailing and torture of tens of thousands as thuggish or the thuggish propagandists on this forum and on Syrian TV who were calling for a scorched earth policy and killing. And, yes I will be violent when you kill tens of thousands of my people and expect me to smile at you. I am not blaming my thuggish behaviour on others, but as a response to them, something you refuse to acknowledge.

“Nevertheless, here are my points to your response:”

What points? You refuse to incriminate yourself.

“Note: I will never forget that you, the non-Syrian, threatened to kick me out of my country of birth Syria. You said this to me on numerous posts.”

You certainly didn’t have a problem when the Syrian regime kicked hundreds of thousands of Syrians out of Syria? What makes you so special? As for me being non-Syrian, why did your Syrian regime exile many of its opponents in Lebanon? What are you going to do when Asad falls?

“1- You are trying to link me to the words of others that is wrong. I told you many times (you seem to neglect this fact) that these men you are trying to bring into the conversations are responsible for their ideas and words. I am responsible for my own. I, as evidenced from all of my comments, am against all types of violence,”

So why are you just responding to me? I didn’t see you in any of your other posts condemn the oppression of Syrian regime unless you were asked. Why are you just accusing me of thuggery while ignoring the thuggery of the regime and its backers? Secondly, you defended thugs like SNK and you can go back and read his thuggish comments and his pathetic retorts, so yes, you do apply a double standard.

” weather it is by the Assad troops or the demonstrators. I see the ills of both sides. I want order to be restored as soon as possible as well democracy. You are not interested in that. You have my posts on this site and you can go through it all.”

This is the elephant in the room, the Syrian regime’s oppression of Syrian Sunnis and why the people are protesting. You and your ilk refuse to acknowledge this point. You say you condemn the oppression of the regime, yet you refuse to acknowledge this and bring up side issues. You want to sweep this issue under the rug and you have the same mentality as the menhebek lunatics, even though you say you condemn the regime and its actions. Do you expect the regime to kill tens of thousands and the people to smile at them? Would you support the trial of Bashar, or Shawkat or Maher? I strongly doubt it.

“2- You told us many times that everyone is sectarian and that is why you are this HUGE unabashed sectarian.”

I am a Sunni sectarian and I didn’t deny it, but many of the menhebek lunatics refuse to acknowledge the utter sectarianism of their regime.

” You are wrong again Mr. Abu Umar and I advise you to wake up and see that there are many who are not sectarian.”

Yes, there are many non-sectarians, and you aren’t one of them.

” I for example do not believe in religions so therefore I do not know what a sect is except when I come across sectarian kokos like you. Secularism is the remedy for this disease.”

You must be very retarded. Sectarianism can come in many forms, including non-religious, such as tribalism, ultra-nationalism, etc. This is why many non-religious Jews support Israel or why many Americans support their government even when it kills millions. You accuse me of something all groups are guilty of.

“3- I am not pro Assad and this little fact seem not to get to your head. You keep on calling me something I am not. See; this is another childish trait of yours’ mr. Abu Umar. You can not discourse like adults. Children deny things. Adults argue and discuss things. Children can not take criticism. Adults can take criticism.”

You call your browbeating and insults discussion? So lets discuss the main issue, the oppression of the Syrian regime and the conditions in Syrian prisons, which you try to sweep under the rug? You certainly are pro-Asad when you don’t want to see the regime fall.

“4- You seem to see every Alawi in the world as responsible for crimes against Sunnis.”

In the last 30 years yes, as the majority of them have supported the Asad regime and the army divisions which killed tens of thousands of Sunnis were filled mostly with Alawis. Maher al-Asad’s unit isn’t majority Sunni, so your words are disproved by the action of the Alawis.

” You know you seem like a joke when you claim that.”

Show me the sectarian breakdown of the army and mukhabarat units involved in the killing of Sunnis, then you can claim that this is a joke.

” I know some Alawis who went to fight for your cause 1948, why you seem to be interested more into making them all with no exception just interested into the killing of Palestinians and other Sunnis.”

Good for them. I know Palestinians who served your regime. You continue to try to sweep under the rug that your regime killed tens of thousands of Sunnis so it can maintain its grip on power, and your Alawi sectarianism shows.

” This is another childish claim of yours.”

See above. The reality on the ground isn’t childish, and if it was otherwise, than the units involved in the current crackdown would be filled with Sunnis.

” You are even worst than al-3Arur.”

Be careful what you wish for.

” Funny when you claimed that you are an “open minded,” I almost fell from the chair laughing, whom are you kidding.”

Yes, I am open-minded and I am willing looking to look at a situation from a different group’s viewpoint, even though I have little sympathy for them. I don’t hide my sectarianism.

” You consider yourself an executioner سياف with the keys to paradise. You think you can judge people because of their religions and sects, who are you? who gives you the right to say that?”

Do you expect your regime to kill tens of thousands and us to smile at you?
!إقتل قتيل و إمشي بجنارتو
That might have worked on Jumblat and Sa’d al-Hariri, but it won’t work this time.

“As for the Alawis and France, you seem to forget, as usual, that the Alawis were fast to rebel against the French, even though the French gave the Alawis a state. Saleh al-Ali rebelled against the French and was for a united Syria. Have you heard of him?”

Yes, and I said a large groups of Alawis, not all Alawis, just like their were many Palestinians who collaborated with the British and the Zionists and many who resisted them, and I specifically mentioned Asad’s grandfather. Why are you inconsistent in your ideals when you claimed that you don’t care about mumaana? Why does it bother you when I mentioned many Alawis were stooges for the French?

” And as for the “document” that the “Alawi notables” send France: I am still waiting to see it. I have heard Sunnis talk about it for years and never seen one copy of it. Do you have a link to that document mr. Aby Umar, or is it another lie of yours?”

Yes, Landis, mentioned it in the New York Times, as did Pierre Gemayel years ago. Of course, an Alawi sectarian like you won’t acknowledge it, and the Alawite leaders like Asad’s grandfather even praised the Zionists and blamed the Palestinian for becoming refugees in their own land. Again why are you bothered by this, if you claim that you don’t care about mumana. We’ll see how you change your tune in a subsequent post.

“5- As for my heritage; it is secularism. My father did not care about religion and was more into books that mattered. He told me to judge people by their deeds and intentions for other people. He did not tell me that so and so is an infidel and could be killed.”

And yet, you still are an extreme Alawi sectarian, just like the extreme Zionist sectarians, who are non-religious.

” My heritage is criticism and science and not believing in the supernatural and if I could let you get into paradise or not.”

So why are you afraid to criticise Ali ibn Abi Talib?

” I respect people.”

You respect those who sing to your tune.

” This is my heritage mr. Abu Umar. Your heritage is that of killing and denying the other even exist.”

My heritage is your heritage and you Alawis have shown yourself to be very adept at killing so you can maintain your grip on power and your regime and its supporters deny that the opposition to the regime exists because of this.

“6- AS for Ali ibn Abi Taleb, you want me to call him a criminal because he killed in his days.”

No, I don’t want you to call him a criminal. I want you to be consistent in your criticisms, which of course you are not, because of your Alawi sectarianism.

” I tell you, I do not know if he killed anyone or not.”

No, he was a pacifist. Open the books of seerah to see otherwise.

” The who history of the era of Ali Ibn Abi Taleb had been written in the Abbasid period. So we really are not sure of what had happened in his days.”

Nonsense. You yourself said that Islam was violent was from day one and Ali was a major player at this time, especially in the battles and wars.

” I do not know if he killed anyone because I do not believe the historiography of that period.”

So why did you accuse Muslims of being violent from the beginning? Was Ali in his house the whole time?

” As for the works we have of Ali Ibn Abi Taleb, like Nahj al-Balaghah (one of my favorite books) was written by al-Sharif al-Radi, according to one theory, or by others. All the knowledge we have about Ali ibn Abi Taleb is contested.”

Why is all the knowledge about Ali contested, when you attacked Islam as violent from day one? The books of seerah clearly prove that he was involved in many battles.

” I know his books that are nothing but philosophical writings about life and less about religion and sects. NOW TO COMPARE HIM TO THE CRIMINAL IBN TAYMIYAH: We have all the books of Ibn Taymiyah. He lived in a very well documented period. WE have the decrees of Ibn Taymiyah that calls the Christians, Jews, and every non Sunni an infidel. We have this document and many of you still believe in it.”

Ibn Taymiyyah wasn’t the first to declare people infidels, this happened at the dawn of Islam and the Arab polytheists were fought as infidels. Attack the source, not the fruits.

” Ali Ibn Abi Taleb did not issue any decree. You lied when you said that.”

Yes, he did and I didn’t lie, unless you think Ali was some sort of pacifist.

“Funny also the point you made when you said that Ali Ibn Abi Taleb is not on my side. How do you know? You called him and he told you that he was on the side on Ibn Taymiyah?”

His beliefs and actions prove that he wasn’t on your side and he certainly is closer to Ibn Taymiyyah than a lunatic like yourself. Where did Ali call for any of the nonsense you are calling for?

” Remember what did Ibn Taymiyah said about Ali and how he did not like him. Your Ibn Taymiyah did not like Ali. Do you want me to bring you the evidence?”

No, I am not interested in your lies, and Ibn Taymiyyah praised Ali many times in his books. Criticising Twelvers isn’t similar to criticising Ali.

\”How many times does the word kill is mentioned in the Decrees of Ibn Taymiyah? How many times in this multi volume book, that is the heart of many Sunni institutions (even states like Saudi Arabia) did Ibn Taymiyah call the Christians, Jews, and non-Sunnis infidels? Who are you Abu Umar to classify people like that? Who is Ibn Taymiyah to put himself the doorman to paradise?\”

Attack the source. Is the Prophet a war criminal?

“7- AS for gay rights you did not answer what are your plans for gays in the Muslim World?”

I answered, but I don’t care and you have shown yourself to be a hypocrite.

” AS for my village, I am from a city Abu Umar ”

Preaching what you don’t practise?!

“and if in my city there were gays who wanted to parade, I care less, let them do whatever they want. I am no one to judge them. I hate to see people hate on them because of their sexual orientation. It is not my business. What are your ideas about gays mr. Abu Umar?\”

So invite Western gays to hold a parade in the Alawi cities, villages and neighbourhoods, then I can say you are honest.

“8- As for Birth Control: you did not answer as expected and asked me to go and preach that to HuzbAllah and Iran. See how much of a child you are.”

The child is the one who refuses to admit the obvious. You are calling for birth control because the high birthrates of Sunnis are a demographic threat to you, even the Israelis admit this of the Palestinians.

” I will talk about it to anyone, and I am sure that Huzballah and Iran and the Shia are more open minded any day than you and Sunnis with the same mental fabric like you.”

Nonsense, and go preach gay rights to them too, and see how open-minded they are.

“9- Zionism in your scapegoat for all the failures you have in life. you fall from your bed and you blame Zionism, your soccer team loses you blame Zionism, you get sick you blame Zionism. Am I telling the truth here?”

No, you are lying, but of course, you still refuse to admit why many Syrian Sunnis hate your regime.

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July 28th, 2011, 9:44 am

 

70. MGB said:

Sorry to break the bad news to you AP, but in post-liberation Syria the people will be chanting anti-zionism slogans of their own free will more strongly and vigorously and with with true conviction, and you’ll also be surprised that they won’t allow their democratically- elected government to do any under-the-table deals that serve Israel’s stability as the current regime and that of Asad pere before it have done. So I reckon you’d better start vacating those settlements out of the Golan pretty quick!

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July 28th, 2011, 9:45 am

 

71. Abu Umar said:

” 53. Aboud said:”

Don’t worry, they’ll be enjoying the secular paradise of Iran when their time runs up.

“68. Akbar Palace said:”

Why were you silent all of a sudden when you were exposed for your hypocrisy? Why does Israel claim to be a democracy and claim to want to spread democracy as you falsely claimed on this blog, when it backed some of the most violent regimes for decades? Why the hypocrisy?

By the way, was your “Akbar Palace” built on land stolen from the Palestinians?

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July 28th, 2011, 9:54 am

 

72. beaware said:

Divided Syrian Kurds Ponder Unity Conference
28/07/2011
http://www.rudaw.net/english/news/syria/3855.html

More than four months after protests began in Syria, Kurdish parties still do not have a clear agenda if the Baath regime falls. Some Kurdish politicians maintain the problem could be solved through a conference to unite the Kurdish front.

Nuri Brimo, spokesman for the Kurdish Democratic Party in Syria, said Syrian Kurdish groups are debating whether to hold a Kurdish unity conference. The groups are divided over who should represent them in opposition conferences and have no clear agenda to push at the gatherings, Syrian Kurdish leaders say.

Over the past few months the Syrian opposition has held several conferences in Turkey. The Kurds have always come out empty-handed, however. Most even withdrew from the most recent conference, held in Istanbul earlier this month, over concerns that their interests were not being represented.

Radhwan Badini, a Syrian Kurdish leader who has attended three opposition conferences in Turkey, criticized Arab opposition groups for not sticking to the opposition’s agenda.

“In most of the conference we agreed on one agenda with the Arab parties, but halfway through the conference they would switch their stance and stand against the Kurds,” Badini told Rudaw.

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July 28th, 2011, 10:17 am

 

73. mjabali said:

Abu Umar comment #69

As the wise Abu Ghassan said before, answering back comments like yours is a waste of time. But, still I want to refute your lies again and again and will be brief:

1- You hate me not because of my ideas, but because I stated that I do not like Islam. This is what ticked you about me and made you attack me as we have seen. So do not lie again and try to hide your true feelings by making all of these accusations and assumptions about me. Be a brave man and say that you hate me because I do not like Islam. Be also a brave man, and true to your religion, and say that I am worthy of death because of that.

2- As for me being a ‘Alawi, I do not know what is the ‘Alawi religion, never learned it, do not know how they pray, who are their clergy, and never met with any ‘Alawi clergyman to learn the ‘Alawi way. So I am not a ‘Alawi. My father did not teach me any ‘Alawi practices. So, Mr. Abu Umar wake up….My family taught me secularism not religion. You seem not to be able to comprehend this advanced idea.

3- You lie when you say that ‘Ali ibn Abi Taleb issued decrees/fatawi to kill people who are different religiously than him. Where is this decree/Fatwa? I want the text, where is that text?

4- Ibn Taymiyah’s Decrees (plural and not only one Decree) are well preserved….His words asking his followers to consider anyone not Sunni like them as an infidel worthy of death are in his books. So you lie when you deny them. He mentions the word kill them in his decrees way too many times.

5- AS for the ‘Alawi “notables” and the document they send to the French: Where is that document? I have not seen it. I heard lots about it but never saw it.

6- As for the gay issues in the Muslim world, you run away from answering as your habit, what do you have in store for gays in the Muslim world? What did Ibn Taymiah say about the gays?

7- As for Birth control: You seem to also run away from answering a straight answer. What is your plan for Birth Control?

8- As for your claim that you are an “open minded” person, I think that is another lie of yours.

9- As for Islam and the sources about its violent history, I read the Quran and see the evidence. I do not need to believe the books written in the Abbasid period. It is mostly fabrications. But from the moment we could record the history of Islam and Muslim people we see nothing but violence and no respect to others and intention to hurt others.

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July 28th, 2011, 10:27 am

 

74. Akbar Palace said:

Jewish Controlled anti-Zionism

Sorry to break the bad news to you AP, but in post-liberation Syria the people will be chanting anti-zionism slogans of their own free will more strongly and vigorously and with with true conviction, and you’ll also be surprised that they won’t allow their democratically- elected government to do any under-the-table deals that serve Israel’s stability as the current regime and that of Asad pere before it have done.

MGB,

What you describe doesn’t seem like it was formulated in the all-powerful, “Jewish Controlled Media”;)

And my guess is that if Syrians were free like Arab-Israelis, I doubt if there would be demonstrations against the Syrian government like what we are witnessing today.

But, good luck with the chanting; I’m sure Junior is happy to know that these chants are growing “more strongly and vigorously”.

So I reckon you’d better start vacating those settlements out of the Golan pretty quick!

You reckon wrong. But Israelis are willing to listen to peace proposals. However, if you want the Golan, you are welcome to go take it!

The other alternative is to talk about peace and all the mushy details, including that white and blue flag flying in Damascus.

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July 28th, 2011, 10:30 am

 

75. Aboud said:

MNA

“Wanting justice” has no time limit and is a double-edged sword”

No, we must punish everyone who ever put on a Besho T-Shirt.

I jest of course. The biggest mistake the Americans made in Iraq was to dissolve the army and fire anyone who belonged to the Baath Party from their civil service jobs. America after its civil war, and Germany after WW2, both managed to move on because an amnesty was given to the losing side, with the exception of a few particularly nasty individuals.

When junior falls, it is inevitable that the nastiest elements of the regime will flee with him. They won’t stay around to face the music. How much of the rank and file mukhabarat is it feasible to punish?

It is too early to talk of amnesties and forgiveness. You certainly don’t want to give the impression to the regime’s thugs that they can keep on slaughtering and torturing people, and all will be forgiven. However, they should keep in mind that in a country like Syria, every jailer, every shabiha scum, every intelligence officer’s name is known. There is no anonymity whatsoever. Just ask the guy who tortured Hamza Khatib to death.

Oh wait, you can’t anymore. There is something to be said for Hourani tribal justice.

@74 Akbar Palace

“However, if you want the Golan, you are welcome go take it!”

>_<

Give us the Golan back, or be subjected to the agony of Ar'or with a megaphone, blasting his sermons at you from Qunietra.

"The other alternative is to talk about peace and all the mushy details, including that white a blue flag flying in Damascus. "

Syrians have no problem with the Argentine flag in Damascus :p

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July 28th, 2011, 10:31 am

 

76. Abu Umar said:

” 73. mjabali said:

Abu Umar comment #69

I’m not going to engage in anymore tit and tat with a coward like you who slithers like a snake when he is exposed for his lies. The elephant in the room is the oppression and killing of tens of thousands of Syrian Sunnis by the regime with strong sectarian overtones so it can maintain its hold on power, and you continue to insist all sectarianism must be religious. How many Alawis involved in the recent crackdown have a clue about their Alawi beliefs?! You continue to try to sweep this under the rug and this will be your downfall. The Syrian regime’s days are numbered and I guarantee you if thousands of your people were being killed, you would be calling for war. Go tell the millions of Syrian Sunnis to forget what your regime did to them. Your regime will fall, and if you don’t like it, you can always join Bashar in Iran.

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July 28th, 2011, 10:54 am

 

77. AKbar Palace said:

Syrians have no problem with the Argentine flag in Damascus :p

Aboud,

Your sarcasm should not be tolerated any longer on this website.

Professor Josh!!!

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July 28th, 2011, 11:29 am

 

78. scooby said:

Dear Josh,

Your title “Buti expelled from mosque” is extremely misleading. The clips that you show are from MONTHS ago, when the protests started to spread to Damascus. They occurred AFTER the Friday prayers were finished and when some people rushed the pulpit shouting anti-government slogans. All of the clips that follow took place in the week following that sermon, back in March.

Please be more scrupulous in what you are presenting and how it is being read.

Scooby.

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July 28th, 2011, 11:31 am

 

79. Aboud said:

AP @ 77

“Aboud,

Your sarcasm should not be tolerated any longer on this website.

Professor Josh!!! ”

Someone corrected me just now. There are some Syrians who do object to the Argentine flag. Namely, stuck up Brazil and Germany supporters.

Myself, I supported England. What was I thinking….

People, please give professor Landis a break. He is the one academic I’ve seen who admits it when he makes a mistake, and who doesn’t think he is the heir apparent to Newton’s legacy. In due course I’m sure a correction will be posted, thanks to the vigilance of the the website’s readers.

Professor Landis can be excused. But not the Baathists who originally posted that video, knowing full well it was misleading. Even now, they don’t have the cahoonas God gave to a Chihuahua to admit the video isn’t what they would like people to believe it is.

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July 28th, 2011, 11:45 am

 

80. MGB said:

Oh dear, so Akbar Palace bisharq-el-awsat, built on stolen Palestinian land also wants to rob us of the right to use sarcasm too, eh?

BTW, you wouldn’t happen to have any inside knowledge of a possible private email from junior to uncle Shimon asking him to endorse the revolution (a-la-Zawahiri) so that it is immediately discredited by the Syrian Official Media (aka, the menhebbak mouthpiece)?

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July 28th, 2011, 11:47 am

 

81. mjabali said:

Mr. Abu Umar comment # 76

Again Mr. Abu Umar resorts to lies, negation of the others, running away from the topic, and threats of violence without answering the real questions, or come up with any text that he was asked to provide.

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July 28th, 2011, 11:50 am

 

82. hsyrian said:

About modern free media

First an ANONYMOUS starts a petition on avaaz.org
with a juicy Amina’s style title :
“Save Syria’s Disappeared”
with a juicy Amina’s style tale :
” Muntaha’s sixteen year old son was abducted from a peaceful democracy protest by Syrian security forces. She has spent the last eight weeks scouring the country for her child – …. ”

claiming that the petition — it is being delivered by high profile media outlets around the world including the Times of India, the GUARDIAN , CNN and Der Spiegel.

asking for the leaders of India, Brazil, South Africa, Kuwait and QATAR to send a human rights delegation to Syria immediately to investigate !!!!

Second a “journalist” takes the tale :
Syrian protesters seized at rate of one every hour, say activists

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jul/28/syria-protesters-disappeared-avaaz?CMP=twt_gu

by changing the title afterward.

Third spainguy posts the link for the GUARDIAN article on reddit.com
http://www.reddit.com/user/spainguy

Fourth others like http://twitter.com/#!/ScumBagSteve_ start to retweet the GUARDIAN title.
https://twitter.com/#!/search/realtime/%27forcibly%20disappeared%27

The spin has started !!

Expect soon to see it as a fact in the Round UP News here.

But NOBODY during all this process checked the FACTS.

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July 28th, 2011, 12:13 pm

 

83. aboali said:

http://www.economist.com/node/21524855

The Economist, The contagion of democracy has at last begun to infect Damascus

DURING four months of protests that have spread across the entire country, the city that has been most protected from the waves of popular rage is Damascus, the capital itself. Almost all the poor villages and suburbs surrounding it have been affected but the more prosperous central parts of the city have generally been kept off-limits to the protesters. This may now be changing, as the contagion of dissent seeps further into the heart of the capital.

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July 28th, 2011, 12:30 pm

 

84. Akbar Palace said:

Give Professor Josh a Break?

People, please give professor Landis a break. He is the one academic I’ve seen who admits it when he makes a mistake, and who doesn’t think he is the heir apparent to Newton’s legacy.

Aboud,

I give people lots of breaks. But I’ve been on this website too long, and I recall too many posts and articles excusing and praising Junior. Things have changed a little…

Joshua said:

Dear QN, You write: “These issues, however, are small potatoes compared to the damage that the relationship will sustain if Syria uses Hizbullah to turn up the heat on Israel again, with all of Lebanon paying the price.”

Syria will undoubted encourage Hizbullah to turn up the heat on Israel if peace talks go no where. What else can it do? The only reason Israel is talking to Syria today is because Olmert couldn’t destroy Hizbullah by force of arms. Without Hizbullah, there would be no talks or hope of Syria getting back the Golan, I fear.

This all means that Syria will try to keep that card an ace.

That, you will say, suggests that Syria really has no regard for Lebanese sovereignty. I would argue that what it really means is that Syria places its own national interests above those of Lebanon and that Lebanon is too weak to deny Syria Hizbullah.

We get back to the old question of how Lebanese should try to deal with it annoying Syria problem.

Lebanese should support Syria’s cause of getting back the Golan as best they can, rather than trying to thwart it, as Geagea et al do.

They, of course, believe Syria wants to own Lebanon and unify, which helps explain why they would prefer to side with Israel to defeat Syria. I think we have proven that this is a losing strategy for Lebanon.

Supporting Syria’s claim to the Golan may also be a losing strategy, but, at least, many Israelis still say that they will return it under the right circumstances.

best, Joshua

August 25th, 2008, 10:31 pm

This is what Qunfuz had to say a few years back when Junior wasn’t giving him ulcers:

111. qunfuz said:

O for God’s sake Shai, how long will you continue repeating the same rubbish? Years of peace process have brought Israel more stolen land and water and the Palestinians more dispossession and apartheid. And the violence of the oppressor and the oppressed is NOT the same. What you call terror attacks is resistance to Zionist ethnic cleansing, apartheid, and massacre. You say: “No Israeli is willing to listen to the “why”, or to the difference between the two.” That is precisely why there is no point talking to Israelis at the moment. You will say that’s what the Israelis say about the Arabs, and I repeat – the Arabs have tried making peace, and it has brought only more disaster. The Arabs do not occupy the Israelis. The Arabs have not ethnically cleansed the Israelis.

Zionism is based on the concept of Jewish superiority over the natives of Palestine. It necessitates bouts of ethnic cleansing and massacre, and can only survive while the Arabs are controlled by dictators. Zionism is an evil. There can be no peace with it. We don’t want peace anyway, we want justice.

94% of Israelis supported the disgusting racist massacre of innocents in Gaza. Ninety four per cent. Don’t talk to us about partners for peace. Your rhetoric is sick, like your society.

I don’t imagine we can defeat you in the near future. This situation is truly tragic. But enough of dialogue with you monsters and your monstrous ideology. Resistance doesn’t have to be violent – though I support absolutely any means the Palestinians employ to resist the genocide – but resistance is the only option.

(By the way, there are an increasing number of Jews OUTSIDE of your apartheid state who do see the difference between the violence of the oppressor and the violence of the oppressed. This provides a glimmer of hope. Zionists like you, even if you’re soft Zionists, provide no reason to hope whatsoever.)

February 4th, 2009, 5:01 pm

From Nov. 27, 2007: Professor Josh states:

Bush’s speech cannot be read as promising for Syria. Syria was not mentioned.

The stress was on Democracy – Democracy as a precondition for any concessions to Palestinians.

The only oblique reference to Syria was a reference to Lebanon. Bush stressed the important of cultivating “Democracy” in Lebanon, which is code for defeating Hizbullah and empowering Sunni Lebanese and Saad Hariri’s Future Movement over Shiites, pushing out Syrian influence, and defeating the Lebanese opposition.

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July 28th, 2011, 12:32 pm

 

85. MNA said:

Aboud,

1- I said that I stated what I want to state and you stated wht you want to state and I have nothing to add not b/c I m not interested in the discussion. I heard you and just did not think that I had anything to add that would be of benefit to this discussion.
2- Just going to ignore that you slapped with with a ready-to-use label and called me a baathist. Not that there is anything wrong with being a baathist, but I never and will never be a baathist or a member of any party for that matter.
3- As for your use of KSA, I was led to believe that you were defending it. If your are telling me that KSA is the devil of all devils, or it is as bad as the Baath, in yr opinion, b/c I know how you feel about the Baath, then I will take back my comment.
4- I agree that accountibility is nonexistant in Syria and it is one of the major draw backs. When Syria starts to enforce accountability all of its problems will fall in line one after another. However, accountability has to be to all.
5- The President himself admitted that there were mistakes committed by security service. Since he is where the bus stops, then an opology is indeed in order and there is nothing wrong with it. At the same time, I would insist on an apology by everyone who contributed to bloodshed on the other side. Including an opology to the families of the security agents and Army who were slaughtered in Jisr Al-Shaghour.

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July 28th, 2011, 12:58 pm

 

86. Aldendeshe said:

Praise the Lord Jesus, Christianity is already making headway in Arabia. Check out these 3 links:

http://magazine.fourseasons.com/destinations/middle_east_africa/riyadh/

http://trialx.com/i/2011/06/14/information-about-riyadh-saudi-arabia/

http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/False%20Religions/Illuminati/pope_eye.htm

We need more missionaries, more Bibles and more Hagge’s to bring the word of the true god to the heathen Wahabbis and Anza tribesmen of Arabia. Join me brothers in Christ on our god ordained mission to convert the heathen to Evangelism. Let’s fulfill the word of god, it is your duty, lets hasten the coming of our Lord and Savior Jesus for he said this:

“…Matt 24:14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world … Jesus will return after the gospel of the kingdom has been preached to all … To reach the youth and children who are potential leaders in the kingdom and …”

Brothers, only one country left that do not allow the gospel to be preached to its enslaved nation, Saudi Arabia, this absolute Pheroenic Monarchy was founded with blood by a Jewish denial of Christian faith named Mordakhai bin Ibrahim bin Moshe, who change name to SAUD, read more about this evil man and his descendant here:

http://theforbiddentruth.net/12375-saudi-family-conceal-their-jewish-origin.html

Brothers of the Lord, Latter Day Saints, Jehovah witness, Brother Hagge, now is the time to descent on Arabia and preaches the gospel of our lord Jesus to the heathen Wahhabis, more about Jewish origin of Wahabbism is here:

http://surrenderingislam.com/surrendering-islam/saudis

Brothers in faith, only one country in our way to fulfill the Bible Glorious Promise left, now that Israel is thriving, now that the lord Jesus redeemed his fig tree, there is only one nation left to fulfill the word of God and bring the gospel to the entire world, Arabia, that is all.

Brother Hagge, we need your help to send bibles, holy crosses and missionary, we have the technology of cell phones, we can even set our own cell network and access the entire disbelieving nations of Wahabbe Kuffar.

Only then brothers, only when we fulfill this last promise, would our Lord and Savior Jesus return to glorious Israel and land on mount of olive to rebuild the 3rd. Temple that will last for eternity.

Ya all heads the call now and begin the missionary work to convert the Anza tribesmen and Wahabbi away from the devil Lucifer and into the arms of our Lord Jesus.

Uuuuuuuhhhh, little crude but, I will get this campaign and my language refined soon, this beats and resolve the conflict I had with offending the Iranians Shia Moslems with Stop Islamization Campaign Worldwide backed by “GANO” Global Alliance of Nationalist Organizations. This looks good; we get to use positive rather than negative means. By “Negative” I mean offending Moslem Iranians and promoting hatred and discrimination, Positive is turning Arabia into a moderate place with civilized humans, rather than the Khanzirs and Anza they are now. Get to emancipate the women of Arabia from bondage and more positive: bring Christianity moderation to Arabia. HELLOF Deal.

All right, after Ramadan ends, and after the Anza tribesmen celebrate the devil and his blood thirsty spirit by spending 3 days shedding blood in the streets, slaughtering poor herbivores animals and slaughtering Syrians in the Streets, I will set up a church and start Christian Evangelical Crusade in Arabia using Cellular network and .mobi networks, I am sure many of you brothers will support me in the *THE MISSION*

The Mission, that will be a nice name, wait, wait…ok I registered the domain name for the central hub site that will link 62 million cells in Arabia with Jesus, here it is keep on file : http://www.themission.mobi

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July 28th, 2011, 1:17 pm

 

87. beaware said:

Israel, South Sudan establish full diplomatic relations
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-07/28/c_131016324.htm
JERUSALEM, July 28 (Xinhua) — A press communique by the Israeli Foreign Ministry stated Thursday that Israel has established official diplomatic relations with South Sudan.

The document stressed Israel’s desire to “promote and strengthen ties of friendship and cooperation between their countries and peoples” and not to interfere in each other’s internal affairs.

“Israel is always looking to improve relations with as many countries as possible,” a Foreign Ministry official source told Xinhua, “and the establishment of diplomatic relations with South Sudan sends a very important message to the international community and especially to the Palestinians, because South Sudan achieved its independence through a negotiated process, not a unilateral decision…..

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July 28th, 2011, 1:18 pm

 

88. 5 dancing shlomos said:

“JERUSALEM – Syrian leader Bashar Assad must step down, Israel’s president declared Tuesday…”

who cares what comes out of the mouth of this ancient, dwarf, anti semite who occupies and fouls semite land.

and

wants to add syria.

return to your coffin bloodless, blood-sucking vampire.

the blood-sucking blood-suckers, wsj and imf, swoon when people are given the “opportunity” to sleep on the streets, starve, rot from diseases.

and

be servile to jewry.

these are the goals of the zionized west.

this is what the syrian govt is fighting and the govt will win because the great majority of syrians will fight with its govt.

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July 28th, 2011, 1:37 pm

 

89. Aboud said:

MNA, I apologize for labeling you the way I did.

(“Aboud apologizing for using the word Baathist? Who are you, and what have you done with the real Pony Tail Aboud!”)

AP @ 84

“But I’ve been on this website too long, and I recall too many posts and articles excusing and praising Junior”

You’re looking at one of the people who bent over backwards to look for excuses on Bashar’s behalf. Up until the middle of April, I really believed Bashar was a reformer, shackled by hardliners.

Then the regime’s thugs massacred people at the New Clock Square in Homs, the site of the most beautiful demonstration in Syria up till then. Since then, Bashar was no more. He became junior, a man too inept to exert his own leadership in any meaningful way.

AP, I don’t have your long memory for what was said when on this website. Until last April, what did junior do that was so terrible that you’d expect people to have loathed him as they do now.

But I do agree with you on one thing; Lebanese should not be fighting Israel for the Golan. Syrians should be fighting Israel for the Golan. If Syria was doing its fair share of the fighting, then at least we could call it a common front with Hizbollah.

But for Lebanon to shoulder all the consequences of a conflict with Israel, is cowardice on the part of junior. The Syrian people have proven they are brave beyond measure.

If the shabiha scum love their guns so much, they are more than welcome to use them on the front lines on the Golan. But something tells me that a professional, modern army is not the kind of enemy they are looking to take on.

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July 28th, 2011, 1:44 pm

 

90. Tara said:

Abboud

Don’t become too soft. We are still revolutioning.

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July 28th, 2011, 2:05 pm

 

91. Akbar Palace said:

What fight is more important: Zionism or Human Rights?

The Syrian people have proven they are brave beyond measure.

Aboud,

Yes, for sure. No disputing this.

Syrians should be fighting Israel for the Golan.

Yes, in all honesty, I can’t disagree. It seems to me freedom of speech and freedom of thought is something worth fighting for as well. If Syrians want to fight Israel to regain control of land lost in war, this is up to the Syrian people.

I would prefer a “land for peace” deal, in order to save lives.

Right now, however, it seems fighting for basic human rights is the number 1 priority.

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July 28th, 2011, 2:07 pm

 

92. Aboud said:

AP @ 91 “What fight is more important: Zionism or Human Rights?”

Getting rid of junior and setting up a pluralistic, democratic, representative society will be enough to occupy us for a few years. People are of course free to occupy their time with Israeli misdoings from 50 years hence, or what Ali did or said, or what was said and done to Ali 1400 years ago.

Personally, I find such discussions right now tedious and irrelevant. As irrelevant as whatever Ramadan shows were in the works four months ago.

“I would prefer a “land for peace” deal, in order to save lives.”

The problem is, land for peace was never given a fair chance. The Assad family had absolutely no interest in ending the state of no-war/no peace with Israel. It derived most of its legitimacy and pan-Arab credentials by playing a leading role in the “rejectionist” camp, an approach that has now fallen apart with the regime’s recognition of 1967-borders Palestine.

Tara @ 90 “Don’t become too soft. We are still revolutioning. ”

Well now, I think I did MNA a disservice. I’d die of shock if someone accused me of being a Baathist when I clearly am not one.

@88 “who cares what comes out of the mouth of this ancient, dwarf, anti semite who occupies and fouls semite land.”

You do apparently, judging from your diatribe. Just like how you Baathists bestowed such prominence upon the satellite sheikh, Ar’or. He is the Salman Rushdie of 2011; your obsession with him is what made him so prominent. I think over half is viewership must be menhebaks, obsessed with what he is going to say next.

@86

………what the heck…..

Can I have whatever it is you are smoking? I want to make-believe I’m a Galatic Salahudin leading a Jihad on Mars.

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July 28th, 2011, 2:24 pm

 

93. Joshua said:

Here is the correction I added to the false Buti clip.

Correction:

“scooby said: Dear Josh,

Your title “Buti expelled from mosque” is extremely misleading. The clips that you show are from MONTHS ago, when the protests started to spread to Damascus. They occurred AFTER the Friday prayers were finished and when some people rushed the pulpit shouting anti-government slogans. All of the clips that follow took place in the week following that sermon, back in March.”

Dear Scooby, many thanks for this correction. I was duped by this well crafted video forgery. There are many misleading and falsified videos going around. I have frequently criticized the main stream press for not doing due diligence. Now I have been burned. Mea culpa. I have frequently used Buti as a measure of the “Sunni street.” He is a much respected Imam. I know he has many critics today because of his pro-stability stand, but for him to be expelled from a mosque would be big news and a turning point, of a kind. Thanks for correcting me. I count on the collective knowledge of this discussion board. Merci]

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July 28th, 2011, 3:41 pm

 

94. SYR.Expat said:

60. LOUAI said:

You’re most welcome!

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July 28th, 2011, 4:22 pm

 

95. Aldendeshe said:

I love SC Democracy, neat, I get to leave thumb down on every comment Landis makes here. May Jesus bless you for giving us this freedom and hope you will join our mission to bring the word of Christ to 62 millions in Arabia.

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July 28th, 2011, 4:24 pm

 

96. SyR.Expat said:

“57. MNA said:

SYRIA.EXPAT @ 53

Not exactly SYRIA.EXPAT!
Slogans against both HA and Iran as well as stories of pursian speaking shabiha killing and snipping people were heard at the very first demonstrations in Dar3a before Iran and HA uttered any word of support of the regime.”

I am not sure about that, but even if some people here and there had an issue with Iran and HA. The real loss of popularity for Iran and HA started when they, having condemned the killings in Bahrain, didn’t condemn the killing of Syrian protestors. The double-standard is what disillusioned a lot of people.

Also, it’s important to note that some of the sectarian slogans attributed to demonstrators early on were most probably the work of the government. The opposition has gone to great pains to stress the unity of the Syrian people and the peaceful nature of the protests. It wasn’t always so, but overall it has been quite peaceful and non-sectarian.

One of the most popular slogans is “Wahid, wahid, wahid, ASha’b Assuri wahid.”

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July 28th, 2011, 4:40 pm

 

97. hsyrian said:

Dear Joshua

You are referring to a video but without giving the link.

At least we are sure that , unlike the main stream press , you did not fabricate the video to boost your audience !

For my part , I don’t look any longer to a video anonymously uploaded to Youtube specially when it is aimed to support any claim from any side.

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July 28th, 2011, 4:49 pm

 

98. SYR.Expat said:

I think most people here remember what Mr. Bakhtian, one of the top Baath party leaders, admitted two or more months ago. In a rare moment of candor, he admitted that the Baath party covered up “some” mistakes and embellished them.

Well, he hasn’t resigned since and was not fired. Actually, he’ll help lead way for a new era of transparency in Syria. I can’t wait.

وقال بخيتان, في لقاء حواري مع قيادات حزبية في فرع دمشق وقيادات فروع النقابات إن “مؤتمر الحزب سيكون تاريخياً في حياة الحزب كونه سيسبق الانتخابات التشريعية التي نرى أنها لحظة مفصلية قادمة في حياة سورية، وسيخوضها الحزب لتأكيد دوره النضالي ومتابعة عمله في تحقيق المزيد من الإنجازات والمكتسبات للشعب”، لافتاً إلى أن “العديد من الملفات التي سيناقشها المؤتمر أصبحت جاهزة”.

وتابع الأمين القطري المساعد أنه “من الجحود والنكران محاولة البعض تغييب الإنجازات الكبيرة التي حققها الحزب لجماهير العمال والفلاحين وباقي شرائح المجتمع خلال العقود الماضية، واقتصار حديثهم عن أخطاء ارتكبت هنا أو هناك من قيادات بعثية من دون الإشارة إلى الدور الكبير للحزب وتاريخه النضالي”.

http://www.syria-news.com/readnews.php?sy_seq=135523

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July 28th, 2011, 4:49 pm

 

99. SYR.Expat said:

آلاف شخص في سوريا في عداد المفقودين منذ بداية حركة الاحتجاجات

الكاتب وطن
الخميس, 28 يوليو 2011 15:56

أكدت منظمة (أفاز) الحقوقية أنه يوجد نحو 3 آلاف شخص في سوريا في عداد المفقودين منذ بداية حركة الاحتجاجات التي اندلعت ضد نظام الرئيس السوري بشار الأسد، وأضافت المنظمة غير الحكومية، حسبما ذكرت قناة (فرانس 24) الإخبارية اليوم الخميس، “أن مصير 2.918 معتقل سوري من قبل قوات الأمن منذ 15 مارس الماضي لا يزال غير معلوم”، مشيرة إلى أن ألف شخص اعتقلوا خلال الأسبوع المنصرم.

وأوضحت أنها أعدت قائمة بأسماء الأشخاص المفقودين، مؤكدة أن النظام يضاعف جهوده لقمع المتظاهرين قبل حلول شهر رمضان، وأوضحت أنها بصدد إنشاء موقع إلكتروني يحمل صورا ونبذات عن كافة المفقودين على أن تتجدد معلوماته باستمرار.
ومن ناحية أخرى، أوضحت المنظمة أن إحصاءاتها أفادت مقتل 1.614 شخص منذ بداية حركة الاحتجاجات فى سوريا، واعتقال 26 ألف آخرين فى فترات مختلفة، هذا بالإضافة إلى حبس 12.617 آخرين، وذكرت المنظمة غير الحكومية أنها عملت مع منظمتين للدفاع عن حقوق الإنسان لإعداد هذا الإحصاء والحصول على صور المفقودين ومعلومات شخصية وتواريخ اعتقالهم.
يشار إلى أن كلمة (آفاز) تعني الصوت أو الأغنية في عدة لغات، وتضم منظمة (أفاز) العالمية 9 ملايين شخص، وتعمل على ضمان أن وجهات نظر وقيم الناس في العالم تشكل عملية صنع القرار العالمي.

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July 28th, 2011, 5:05 pm

 

100. some guy in damascus said:

just passed by the muhkabarat head quarters in kafer suseh. i counted more than 30 buses…..looks like sh*t is going down tomorrow.
and being in Damascus i have not heard of a harmful demostration( except the one where government loyalists attacked the american/french/turkish/qatari embassies). personally i have witnessed how these men attack peaceful demonstrators in midan. so tell me again? are these the reforms bashar is heading?

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July 28th, 2011, 5:26 pm

 

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