The Desert Falcons: An Elite Pro-Assad Force

By Aymenn Jawad Al-Tamimi

In the ongoing rebel offensive on Latakia, a new force on the regime side has come to light: namely, the Suqur al-Sahara’ (‘Desert Falcons’).

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Desert Falcons insignia (left), and an anonymous member of the brigade (right).

The Arabic outlet El-Nashra explains:

‘Among these forces [that have emerged in the Syrian civil war] are the Desert Falcons that are fighting in Kasab and are considered the prong of attack and defence of the region especially at Point 45. They began operating in Homs and especially on the borders with Iraq to cut supply/aid paths between armed men in the two lands.

These forces are considered among the elite of men fighting in Syria in support of President Bashar al-Assad, and there are fighting in its ranks members of military expertise, retired officers and members of the army, as well as volunteers from Syrian youth and age groups averaging between 25 and 40 years of age.

The Desert Falcons forces have medium capabilities and arms as well as machine-gun fire, and the army supports it with artillery when necessary, but it specializes in setting up ambushes and carrying out difficult special assignments.

They have already carried out a large number of combat missions on the Jordanian and Iraqi borders, and a group of them are currently participating in the battles in the Kasab area and its surrounding.’

Rather than a merely symbolic presence, the Desert Falcons are a real fighting force and are acknowledged by the Muqawama Suriya as an allied group in the fight to retake Kasab. Below are some more photos including martyrs for the group.

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Members of the Desert Falcons with Syrian army soldiers in unspecified location.

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Manhal Ahmad Muhammad, a Desert Falcons fighter killed in the ongoing battle to retake Kasab.

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Albir Sama’an al-Umuri, a Desert Falcons fighter killed on 2 April 2014 in the Kasab area.

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Brigadier General Harun, a Desert Falcons officer killed on 24 June 2013 in al-Quaryatayn, Homs province. Note that this locality is in the desert area of Homs governorate near Sadad, corroborating El-Nashra’s report on the Desert Falcons’ areas of operation.

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‘The men of al-Assad: Desert Organization.’

(Update)

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Maher Habib As’ad: another Desert Falcons fighter killed in the battle for Kasab. 

Comments (257)


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251. omen said:

awful awful

regime took out a vegetable market in aleppo.

https://twitter.com/TahrirSy

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April 24th, 2014, 6:37 am

 

252. omen said:

245. Hopeful said: #242 Apple_mini I appreciate your voice of reason. Assad and his regime are incapable of reforms. It is unfortunate that the opposition has not been able to give you and others a credible alternative yet.

are you blaming the opposition for the regime remaining? how is that fair? the opposition could consist of 10 million mother teresas but the regime would still be implacable and would still continue to mow people down.

and the undecideds and loyalists stuck in neutral would continue to be immobilized by fear.

discounting the opposition as unworthy of any support doesn’t sound very hopeful.

in fact, blaming the opposition excuses the fearful from admitting their own responsibility for lacking the courage to withdraw support for the regime.

it doesn’t make sense on one hand acknowledge the regime is irredeemable and then turn around & blame the opposition for the regime remaining.

the regime is to judged on its own merits. the regime’s blame belongs to the regime alone.

the regime must go no matter what. no matter the faults and weaknesses of the opposition.

to continue the fault the opposition for everything only strengthens the grip of vicious paralysis.

credible alternative

opposition successes of self organization & rebuilding are given little credit. here is but one example out of several:

In Idlib’s southern countryside, a small village of roughly 8,000 residents provides an example of successful local governance.

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April 24th, 2014, 9:01 am

 

253. Uzair8 said:

Great comment Omen! Excellent!

SubhanAllah!

MashaAllah!

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April 24th, 2014, 9:13 am

 

254. SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

SYRIA LOVER
The word is not crazy…. A bastard SOB is the right word to describe this abomination.

On a second thought, he ain’t a bastard. Apparently he is the abominable crap coming from an abominable father.

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April 24th, 2014, 5:32 pm

 

255. omen said:

245. Hopeful

that said, i do appreciate apple’s seemingly new appraisal of the junta. i know you were being supportive of that.

i wonder what brought on this new willingness to fault the regime.

242. apple_mini said: It is just as stupid and cruel as his public speeches in 2011 when he categorically and conveniently called everyone protesting him and the regime terrorist. …
In the end, Assad and his goons will pay for their reprehensible and moronic decision and arrogance.

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April 24th, 2014, 6:45 pm

 

256. Badr said:

“i wonder what brought on this new willingness to fault the regime”

Perhaps this report sheds some light:

If Assad Wins War, Challenge From His Own Sect May Follow

By ANNE BARNARD, Damascus
The NY Times

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April 25th, 2014, 5:52 am

 

257. Austin Bodetti said:

Are the Desert Falcons part of the Syrian Arab Army or a paramilitary?

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May 17th, 2014, 11:32 pm

 

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