Doubts about Israeli Strike Increase

Fewer Foreigners Crossing Into Iraq From Syria to Fight
Drop Parallels Dip in Al-Qaeda Attacks

By Karen DeYoung
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, September 16, 2007; A19

The number of foreign fighters entering Iraq from Syria has decreased noticeably in recent months, corresponding to a similar decrease in suicide bombings and other attacks by the group al-Qaeda in Iraq, according to U.S. military and intelligence officials.

"There is an early indication of a trend," said Gen. David H. Petraeus, the U.S. commander in Iraq, in an interview. Border crossings from Syria that averaged 80 to 90 a month have fallen to "half or two-thirds of that over the last two or three months," Petraeus said.

An intelligence official said that "the Syrians do appear to be mounting a crackdown on some of the most hardened terrorists transiting through the country, particularly al-Qaeda-affiliated foreign fighters." The official, who was not authorized to speak on the record, said there is also evidence that the Syrians have been stopping return crossings by foreign fighters leaving Iraq.

Other administration officials, while confirming the decrease in border crossings, said they are not yet prepared to attribute it to Syrian action, instead citing increased U.S. operations against al-Qaeda inside Iraq and stepped-up cooperation by terrorist "source" countries, such as Saudi Arabia, in prohibiting travel to Damascus. U.S. intelligence has said Saudis form the biggest group of foreigners fighting with al-Qaeda in Iraq. Petraeus also said his command is uncertain of the reason for the decrease, adding that "we're watching it on the ground."

A National Intelligence Estimate last month attributed an apparent crackdown in Syria to that government's concern about the threat al-Qaeda posed to its own stability. The NIE also assessed that Syria had stepped up its support to non-al-Qaeda groups to bolster their influence — and that of Damascus — in Iraq. Several Iraqi Sunni extremist groups opposed to the United States and al-Qaeda in Iraq are present in Damascus.

…The al-Qaeda in Iraq organization, which largely consists of Iraqi Sunnis, is said to be led by foreigners whose primary route into Iraq is through Syria. Syria is also believed by U.S. officials to be the primary route for foreign terrorists moving out of Iraq to return to their home countries in Arab countries, Europe and North Africa.

Nascent U.S. diplomatic dialogues with Damascus and Tehran, begun last spring after demands by war critics and the Iraqi government, have been judged unproductive by the White House….

Rice plans to attend a second neighbors conference at the end of October in Istanbul, but U.S. policymakers have made no decision on whether they would seek or agree to another high-level meeting with Syria. "We haven't ruled it out yet," an administration official said. "I could speculate that if the end of October came and the numbers of suicide bombers had really dropped significantly and people . . . came to the conclusion there really had been a change in [Syrian] policy, that would give us every reason to have a meeting."

Just as it does with Iran, which the United States alleges is working toward production of a nuclear weapon, U.S. policy toward Syria is to separate Iraq-related issues from other points of contention.

Israeli Official Muzzled on Syria Attack
By AMY TEIBEL
The Associated Press
Sunday, September 16, 2007; 8:52 PM

JERUSALEM — Israel's chief of military intelligence was ordered Sunday not to discuss an alleged air raid on Syria before a powerful parliamentary panel, tightening the veil of secrecy the government has thrown around the issue….

In a statement some participants saw as an oblique reference to the alleged Syria raid, Yadlin told the meeting, "Israel's deterrence has been rehabilitated since the Lebanon war, and it affects the entire regional system, including Iran and Syria," according to a lawmaker who was present.

Idaf, a Syrian reader of S.C. living in the Gulf, had this to say of the Israeli strike:

It was only about the image and perception of who’s boss. All other things are making less and less sense!

The only thing that is making sense is the following:

For a year, Israeli army was feeling desperately insecure, the perception of its deterrence capabilities reduced to a low level not seen before in the eyes of its public and neighboring Arabs. On the other hand, Syria’s military confidence after the war last summer increased to a level where Israel, the US and its Arab allies were feeling really uncomfortable.

The Israeli army badly needed a PR stunt. My hunch is that there was no strike. Only a brief infiltration of airspace and all parties (Israel, US and Arab allies) are trying to milk this to the absolute last drop. It is a media strike rather than an actual military one. In short this was a publicity stunt that won’t cost Israel much but would have great impact on moral and image.

The 4 Israeli messages here were:

To the Israeli military: We are still superior. Pick your selves up and leave this state of low moral reached since the ware last summer.

To the Israeli public: The Israeli government is not as week as you think. Give us some more popularity points please! Oh and by the way, please return the investments and stop leaving Israel to your original countries of origin in Europe and the US.

To the Syrian people: Time’s up for your overconfidence after the war last summer. Go back to the pre July war moral. Stop feeling capable of regaining the Golan by force. Oh and how about you support Bashar less from now on after this humiliation?

To the Syrian government: OK, now that we humiliated you publicly, it’s time to talk peace. No way we were going to go back to negotiation when you were feeling confident militarily.

Just look at the PR campaign raged by the Israeli military in the last few days:

Mystery airstrike on Syria boosts Israeli military – Scotsman

Yadlin: Israeli deterrence restored – J Post

MI Chief: Israel has restored its deterrence capabilities – Haaretz

“Israeli deterrence impacting region” – J Post

Israeli deterrence reinstated, Military Intelligence chief says – Ynetnews

Now, will Syria return the slap? Many believe that the real question here is the following: How will Syria return the slap?

As Imad Moustapha said: “[not responding] would not serve our national interests. That would be detrimental to our national interests, because it would encourage Israel to repeat the same intrusions and operations. As I have said, every reaction creates a reaction. If Israel calculates that they can do what they want, they’re making a big mistake, just as they made a mistake last summer [in 2006, by waging war against Hizbullah in Lebanon].”

Richard Silverstein on his blog Tikun Olam translates a Hebrew language story which casts doubt on the U.S.-Israeli version of what happened in Syria:

The doubters of the U.S.-Israel story that the IAF attacked a Syrian-North Korean nuclear facility in Syria last weak are few and far between inside Israel. So it is worth noting a story published in Hebrew by Israeli Channel 10 correspondent, Yigal Laviv, which warns us to suspend belief until the facts are more fully known……

Comments (72)


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51. IsraeliGuy said:

Thanks, Offended.

I’m sure Akbar and me have a lot of things in common and perhaps some differences and I’m also sure that I have a lot of differences with many of the readers here, but perhaps some things in common.

We’ll have to find out… 😉

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September 19th, 2007, 8:09 am

 

52. Alex said:

By the way, Israeliguy aren’t you “Israeli” who debated us at Creative Forum’s Golan topic?

To answer your question about Lebanon: I am for a two state solution. I wish the Syrians would send an ambassador to Beirut as soon as things are back to normal between the two countries. I was very happy seeing Syrian forces out of Lebanon. It was a mistake to stay that long. They should have left in 2001 or 2002 max.

But that does not mean that relations between the two countries can be totally random. Anyone who tries to force a situation in which Syria is not Lebanon’s closest ally and friend will be messing with many natural processes in that area.

To be honest with you, I am for unifying the two countries, but only when it makes sense … if Syria reforms its economy and its political system sufficiently then I expect a majority of Lebanese people to want to unite with Syria to some degree (economically at least). I am talking five to ten years from now… if the middle east is not destroyed by then.

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September 19th, 2007, 8:18 am

 

53. offended said:

On a side note Alex, what kind of building is that where water pipes are kept at a 4×4 height? ; )
Anyway, alhamdillah 3l salameh..

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September 19th, 2007, 8:29 am

 

54. IsraeliGuy said:

************
“By the way, Israeliguy aren’t you “Israeli” who debated us at Creative Forum’s Golan topic?”
************

No Alex, I’m not.
Probably another Israeli.

************
“But that does not mean that relations between the two countries can be totally random. Anyone who tries to force a situation in which Syria is not Lebanon’s closest ally and friend will be messing with many natural processes in that area.”
************

Ok, let me share my opinion with you.

Syria and Iran are both allies and friends.
Although as an Israeli this partnership deeply worries me, I can understand the mutual interests and the sincere friendship between both countries and peoples.

However, what happens when one party is not interested in being the other’s friend or ally?
Isn’t it something that should be mutual and based on free will?

In your opinion, shouldn’t Lebanon be sovereign to decide on its partners and allies (assuming it has no desire to attack Syria militarily or pose a severe security risk to it)?

************
“To be honest with you, I am for unifying the two countries, but only when it makes sense … ”
************

Ok, and what if Lebanon wants to remain… Lebanon?
Is it their right to be totally independent?

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September 19th, 2007, 8:45 am

 

55. Alex said:

Thanks offended,

It’s an older building, I guess 4X4’s were not popular at the time. Plus, my 4X4 is a quite high, not to mention that I added a roof rack

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September 19th, 2007, 8:46 am

 

56. Alex said:

Israeliguy,

Of course Lebanon should be allowed to chose, i thought I was clear when I said “but only when it makes sense” … that meant: only when a majority of Lebanese will want to be, at least economically, united with Syria to some degree.

I meant to say: Syria today is not attractive enough a partner … that’s where the 5 to 10 years can help. I am expecting Syria to continue its economic reforms and growth, and to match it with sufficient improvement in political freedoms… etc.

At that time, if a majority of Lebanese are still not interested, then of course they should not unite!

One last point: it is a mistake to generalize the opinions of the 30 percent of Lebanese who hate Syria today to make conclusions about the preferences of ALL the Lebanese people. Lebanon is just like Israel (and Palestine, and Iraq) … heavily divided.

Those who do not hate Syria are a majority .. those who consider Syria their most special friend are a large part of the Lebanese people .. take the Shiites, some of the Christians, the Armenians, some Sunnis and some Druze even.

My father’s first cousin has been a Lebanese MP since 1992 … most families in Lebanon have Syrian relatives.

Why do you think the M14 government is very much opposed to early elections? … because they know that they are not a majority anymore. We recently had a key election where Michel Aoun (who is willing to work more closely with Syria) put a no-name candidate against the M14’s star candidate: former president Amin Gemayel …and Gemayel lost the election… in Christian areas (not Shiite Hizbollah areas)

Lebanon, was never fully independent .. you always had Syria, France, Egypt, The United States, Iran, and Saudi Arabia alternating in managing it.

So, the silly voices who repeat today “we want a Lebanon that is free from Syrian influence” are replacing it with their own influence …working against Syria.

Imagine if Syria wanted to be the leader in the Gulf region .. Bahrian, Kuwait … I don’ think Syria will succeed and I don;t think the Saudis will allow it to interfere in their backyard.

Similarly, until Lebanon can one day survive on its own, if anyone is supposed to manage it (with no occupying army!) … Syria knows Lebanon better than the rest of the others combined.

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September 19th, 2007, 9:01 am

 

57. IsraeliGuy said:

***********
“Lebanon, was never fully independent .. you always had Syria, France, Egypt, The United States, Iran, and Saudi Arabia alternating in managing it.”
***********

Hey Alex, that’s not fair – you forgot to mention Israel in this fine list.

Come on, don’t steal our credit after we invested 18 of our better years in occupying a pretty significant part of this beautiful country.

Plus we had our summer vacation there a year ago…

Ok, I’m a sarcastic person – I admit it.
Sorry if it’s a bad joke.

Anyway, although I can certainly appreciate your passion, your intelligence and your coherent writing, I’m afraid I can’t agree with you on this matter.

Please read the following text and tell me what you think:

** ** ** ** ** **

It is a mistake to generalize the Palestinian public.
Many of them are crazy about Israel and it’s their favorite country in the entire world.

The Israeli Prime Minister, Ehud Olmert, receives almost 10,000 fan letters, from average Palestinians everyday.

Most of them beg him to annex the West Bank & Gaza to Israel, since they understand that it’s in their best interest.

In fact, during the disengagement from Gaza in 2005, lots of Palestinians tried to prevent Israel from pulling out.

The idea of not having Israeli soldiers in their streets was too much to bare.

And what about the Jewish settlers?
After 30 years of building intimate friendship between the Palestinians and the settlers, the notion of not having them around any more looked like a bad dream (or a nightmare, to be more accurate).

Now don’t forget that Israel knows the West Bank and Gaza better than any other country.
I mean, we know every city, every neighbourhood, every street and every alley (feel free to quiz me).

In the last 40 years, we proved to be the ultimate managers for these areas and we never had A SINGLE complaint from any Palestinian. None.

In fact, they’re always threatening us that if we’ll ever leave, they’ll cut their wrists – collectively.

** ** ** ** ** **

Ok, now I’ll quit the parody and return to the serious tone.
Alex, the above text didn’t have an intention to ridicule you in any way.

However, when I read your reply, that’s the first association that I had 😉

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September 19th, 2007, 10:11 am

 

58. Alex said:

Israeliguy,

I swear I thought of both points you made : )

1) I was going to add Israel to the list of “managers”. But my definition of that list includes only the countries which overtly managed the politicians in Beirut to some extent.

Israel indeed had some major Lebanese politicians who secretly coordinated on one issue or another. But it was not like Ghazi Kanaan (Syria’s manager of Lebanon for over a decade) receiving all the Lebanese politicians as friends at his home, or today’s American and Saudi and French ambassadors receiving and visiting Lebanese M14 politicians everyday and telling them sometimes what they should not do or what they should do … publicly!

So I’m afraid, you interfered in Lebanon, but never managed it. THe closest you got to managing it was when Ariel Sharon lef the Israeli army into Beirut and when Bashir Gemayel was picked as Lebanese president. He was Israel’s choice, but he did not last long in the job. Lebanon, and the region are far from being able to function with an Israeli picked president.

2) Now for the second point : )

To make it more realistic I want to remind you that there are indeed some Arabs who prefer to stay under Israeli rule… many of the Druze chose Israel and enrolled in its army and I heard from Palestinians that they are among the harshest soldiers in the Israeli army.

The difference in what I stated is that there are many more Lebanese (half to 70%) who “Do not hate Syria” .. that is all I said. I did not say they want Syria to manage them … they do not hate Syria. And for a Lebanese to like Syria and Syrians, he will surely realize that geography, history, economics, politics, and security of the two countries are very often overlapping or very close… do you disagree?

Do you have cousins who are Palestinian MP’s like I do in Lebanon? 😉

Does every Israeli family have a Palestinian relative like Lebanese families all have Syrian relatives?

So I was simply saying that in the future, at some point, I expect (I did not say I call for) a majority of Lebanese to be over the negative feelings of these days and to start thinking about everything logically. Then I do not see why they will not go for it.

We’ll see .. as I said earlier …assuming the region is not destroyed by then.

And finally, after peace settlement … of course the west bank will have special economic relations with Israel. Your sarcastic story is not far from reality. I have Palestinian friends (Fatah moderates) who told me the same.

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September 19th, 2007, 4:53 pm

 

59. IsraeliGuy said:

Alex, trust me on this: no people likes to be occupied by others: not the Palestinians, not the Iraqis and not even the Lebanese.

You may think you’re doing Lebanon a real favor, but for them, you’re just another occupier.
I’m telling you this as a professional occupier – and in fact, we’re both in a similar boat here.

I just like to be truthful on things, even if they don’t portray me at the best light.
I hope you prefer that approach too.

I have 2 questions, if you don’t mind of course.

If you’ll have a totally free and democratic referendum in Lebanon (supervised by the UN) and you’ll ask the Lebanese people to choose one of the following two – what percentage will pick option A and what percentage will prefer option B?

A. I want a 100% independent Lebanon
B. I want Syria to manage Lebanon

If you can give me your best estimate, it would be great.

The 2nd question is this: Syria and Lebanon ‘had some issues’ for decades now.
Israel and the Palestinians are in a bloody conflict for 40 years (actually, even more).

I know why I don’t want to leave the West Bank, with or without an agreement – there’s one reason only: security.

Whether you agree with me or not, forget that for a second, but honestly, that’s my only motive.
I know that when I’ll get out of the West Bank, the terror and rockets will chase me to Tel Aviv, so I’m going to avoid it at all cost.

Now here’s my question: why is Syria so obsessed with managing Lebanon?

I mean, if they posed a security risk to Syria, I could genuinely understand the need to manage them.
If they had huge oil reserves – although I couldn’t agree with the policy, I could understand the Syrian motive.

But really, why is there such a huge obsession?
I mean, why not say ‘screw them’, leave them alone and concetrate on developing Syria proper?

I never could understand that and I admit that I may lack some information here.

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September 19th, 2007, 8:15 pm

 

60. idaf said:

Israeliguy..

Allow me to interfere and answer your last question..

Syria is not “obsessed with managing Lebanon”, its just a natural reaction based on the trial and error experiences since Lebanon existed:

Whenever Syria is not “managing” Lebanon (or at least have a really friendly relationship with it), some other regional or international country will immediately fill the void and exploit the Lebanese sectarian system to harm Syria through Lebanon. Those parties as Alex said included in the past Egypt, France, US, Iraq, the Palestinians and Israel to a lesser extent. Today, since Syria stopped its “management” of Lebanon, immediately Saudi, France, the US jumped in and exploited the void to harm Syria. It’s that simple.

PS. I apologize for any Lebanese offended by my choice of words. I have my reservations on the wording of my comments but used them without being “politically correct” to be inline with the discussion above.

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September 19th, 2007, 8:31 pm

 

61. Alex said:

Israeliguy,

Did I say anything about occupation? … I was always saying we should withdraw from Lebanon starting in 2001. It was a mistake to stay longer. And in the future, “managing Lebanon” should not include Syrian soldiers on Lebanese soil… and nothing heavy handed. No Syrian interference in their press. You know that when Syria had its troops in Lebanon, Annahar was very much anti Syria for years and years. No one closed it.

Israel should withdraw from the west bank too 🙂

Not unilaterally, but after a “new Middle East” is agreed upon by everyone. It is diffiult by doable. Otherwise I agree that you might have more chaos. Israel’s mistake was to withdraw from Lebanon and Gaza unilaterally, not in a carefully planned and negotiated peace agreement with the neighbors (Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinians). THe agreement in 1974 on the Golan was very successful … because Kissinger shuttled for over 20 times between Damascus and Jerusalem to reach that agreement … without trying to fore it on the Syrians … don’t think you can use force to force Arabs to agree or accept anything. Only when they are convinced.

And that applies back to Syria and Lebanon … if in the future the Lebanese are not convinced, Syria should leave them alone, absolutely.

AS for your other point … of course Lebanon is a huge security threat to Syria. YOU have tons of intelligence activity in Lebanon, the Americans, French, Iranians, Saudis, Egyptians .. all have their best intelligence officers stationed in Beirut. Then you have Lebanese milita leaders who would do favors for outsiders for the right price … you have a potential civil war waiting to happen because they can not agree on what to do with the fact that the new majority in Lebanon is Shiite .. because they are split along conservative and secular lines …

Lebanon’s border with Syria leaks both ways … there is no way to seal it. Lebanon is inside Syria (see the map) .. money, weapons, consumer goods adn people can flow with ease both ways.

It is not being paranoid at all.

More importantly, I have other ideas … when Lebanon and Syria become one country it would be .. good for democracy!

The Syrian regime would feel more secure with more minorities (from Lebanon) ensuring the Muslim brotherhood will not win Parliamentary elections in Syria, and the secular Lebanese would feel better about one-man-one-vote not bringing the very religious Hizbollah and its supporters to power in Lebanon …

What do you think? : )

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September 19th, 2007, 8:41 pm

 

62. IsraeliGuy said:

Ok, fair answer, Offended.
Thanks.

By the way, what will be your estimate on my 1st question to Alex?

And another one: if you were among the Lebanese who wished for a 100% independent Lebanon – what would you do?

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September 19th, 2007, 8:44 pm

 

63. IsraeliGuy said:

*************
“What do you think? : ) ”
*************

Well, let me tell you what I think.
I disagree with many of your points, however, I have a lot of respect both to you and to your arguments.

You present them nicely, you have self confidence, you’re not afraid of confronting hard questions from opponents, sarcasm doesn’t intimidate you nor offend you, you’re not afraid of washing some dirty laundry in public, you have some self humor and you do your best not to insult your partner’s intelligence.

Bravo.

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September 19th, 2007, 8:57 pm

 

64. Alex said:

wow! .. thank you. Very kind of you.

If you noticed, it is because you try to do the same when you communicate with those you disagree with here.

You are a very welcome addition to Syria comment to give us an ISraeli perspective.

Our friend Akbar is great too, but he is a republican, and most of us here are democrats I think… that’s why we don’t get along too well sometimes : )

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September 19th, 2007, 9:08 pm

 

65. IsraeliGuy said:

Oh, I thought you’re all Republicans here – aren’t you? 😉

Anyway, since I’m new here, would you mind giving me some crash background on the blog commentators here?

I see that the vast majority are Assad supporters.
Am I wrong?
Plus, how would you characterize the readers here?
Syrians from Syria? People of Syrian decent that live abroad ? Arabs in general from the entire Middle East?

It would be interesting to get some background.

Thanks!

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September 19th, 2007, 9:22 pm

 

66. Alex said:

The vast majority were not Assad supporters up to last year … but since we, Assad supporters, are louder and have more free time, we outlasted the others who have proper jobs.

Today, Bashar supporters are (in my, and other estimates) about 60 to 65% … or 97% if you prefer the official version.

Some here disagree with me .. Bakri for example, he thinks I a imagining things.

Anyway, these are generic titles … no one is 100% pro or against Assad… some who oday sounded like they are supporters are harsh critics in other areas. stick around and you will hear them ask for Assad to go.

Most of the people here are outside Syria … this is an English Blog. There are thousands who read it daily, but most do not feel comfortable enough to write in English.

We also have many Lebanese who “love” Assad : ) … I don’t know where they are today.

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September 19th, 2007, 9:45 pm

 

67. IsraeliGuy said:

Wow, interesting – so how come Assad supporters have more free time and the ones who don’t have proper jobs?

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September 19th, 2007, 9:53 pm

 

68. Alex said:

I’m joking, I’m joking.

There are many others here who are opposed to Assad. That is why this is Syria’s top blog. Everyone is here, Lebanese, Israelis, Americans, and … Syrians.

But I think after the Nuclear weapons story all syrians had enough with the whole thing … even anti-Assad Syrians can not accept the silly new stories.

And Lebanon too … Syrias had enough with the dirty politics.

OK, dinner time for me.

By the way, many here are business owners, consultants, professors … that’s how we all can decide to take the occasional half day off to spend it here on Syria comment. Others chek at night only.

Cheers.

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September 19th, 2007, 10:10 pm

 

69. IsraeliGuy said:

Really appreciate your crash course.
Bonne appetite.

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September 19th, 2007, 10:34 pm

 

70. blowback said:

Israeliguy – “I know why I don’t want to leave the West Bank, with or without an agreement – there’s one reason only: security. Whether you agree with me or not, forget that for a second, but honestly, that’s my only motive. I know that when I’ll get out of the West Bank, the terror and rockets will chase me to Tel Aviv, so I’m going to avoid it at all cost.”

I’m sorry but that claim about rockets following you to Tel Aviv is wearing a bit thin.

Simultaneously with its total takeover of the Gaza Strip, the Hamas leadership implemented a unilateral ceasefire with Israel . For a whole week, not a single Qassam was fired at Sderot and the surrounding district. But then, after only one day as Defence Minister, the new Minister [Ehud Barak] authorised a new operation to seek out people on the wanted list in the Khan Younis region. Five Palestinians were killed while others were injured. As if by magic, the firing of Qassams towards Sderot resumed the very next day.

Forget about Fatah, do a deal with Hamas!

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September 19th, 2007, 10:52 pm

 

71. IsraeliGuy said:

**********
“I’m sorry but that claim about rockets following you to Tel Aviv is wearing a bit thin.”
**********

Don’t dismiss it that fast, Blowback.
The current Palestinian rockets has a range of up to 9 KM if I’m not wrong.
Some made it all the way to Ashkelon and they’re improving – so it’s just a matter of time until the range grows.

Besides, to me it doesn’t really matter if a rocket falls in Tel Aviv or Kfar Saba (a couple of KM from the West Bank).

An Israeli citizen is an Israeli citizen.
The distance between the Mediterranean sea and the West Bank is not that long.

We’re not Syria 🙂

**********
“Simultaneously with its total takeover of the Gaza Strip, the Hamas leadership implemented a unilateral ceasefire with Israel . For a whole week, not a single Qassam was fired at Sderot and the surrounding district. But then, after only one day as Defence Minister, the new Minister [Ehud Barak] authorised a new operation to seek out people on the wanted list in the Khan Younis region. Five Palestinians were killed while others were injured. As if by magic, the firing of Qassams towards Sderot resumed the very next day.”
**********

According to my logic, the second after the pull back from Gaza not a single Qassam should have been fired.
Obviously, my reason is not the Palestinian reason.

**********
“Forget about Fatah, do a deal with Hamas!”
**********

Well, nice idea, but the problem is they don’t want to recognize Israel nor negotiate a permanent status solution with it.

Anyway, Olmert is negotiating Abu Mazen at the moment and there supposed to be a big middle eastern peace convention in a few months.

I’m pretty sure that nothing will come out of it and personally, the way things look, I don’t believe that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is solvable.

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September 19th, 2007, 11:50 pm

 

72. JOHN said:

Do you really think the Israelis didn’t videotape this entire thing?? The U S does on every raid on their F15 I’s. They all use these videos to learn from any mistakes they made or simply to have proof of something. Not that we’ll ever see it, but come on …what a great YOU TUBE favorite. Just kidding of course.

JOHN

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September 20th, 2007, 10:16 pm

 

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