Obama to Assad: “Lead that transition, or get out of the way.”

Obama adopts Bush's policy on Syria

The Syrian people have shown their courage in demanding a transition to democracy. President Assad now has a choice: He can lead that transition, or get out of the way.

The Syrian government must stop shooting demonstrators and allow peaceful protests. It must release political prisoners and stop unjust arrests. It must allow human rights monitors to have access to cities like Daraa; and start a serious dialogue to advance a democratic transition. Otherwise, President Assad and his regime will continue to be challenged from within and will continue to be isolated abroad.

EU will impose sanctions on Syrian president Bashar al-Assad

The foreign ministers on Monday will call for an immediate halt to violence against protesters in Syria and demand that Assad address the causes of the upheavals in the country.

Diplomats in Brussels said the 27 governments would call for a “national dialogue” in Syria, including a concrete timetable for political reform.

According to Politico.

Republican Senator Mark Kirk said “He should have been harder. He should have called on [Assad] to step down.”

Senator John McCain, said “I would have liked for him to say [Assad] should step down, but that was good.”

Freshman Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, introduced a resolution last week with McCain and Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Ben Cardin (D-Md.) urging Obama to expand sanctions against Assad and his top lieutenants.

“I think Assad needs to get out of the way, leave power, and I wish the president would have said that,” Rubio told POLITICO. “I have no hope that Assad is a reformer. He is a murderer like his father before him.”

The sanctions are a “start,” Rubio added, but “I don’t think the Syrian people are going to be happy until Assad is out of the way.”

Under Assad’s rule, the Syrian regime “has chosen the path of murder and the mass arrests of its citizens,” Obama said in his speech at the State Department. Hundreds of unarmed protesters have been killed in clashes with the Syrian military.

Ros-Lehtinen Statement on Obama Middle East and North Africa Speech

(WASHINGTON) – U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, issued the following statement on President Obama’s speech on U.S. policy in the Middle East and North Africa: “I was pleased to hear the President express U.S. support for the advancement of democracy and human rights in the Middle East and North Africa. However, it is difficult to assess the President’s goals and objectives for the region when considering some of his most significant decisions since taking office, which have included pressuring Israel to make concessions to the Palestinians while at the same time reaching out to the Syrian and Iranian regimes.

“The President has now sanctioned Syria’s Assad for gross human rights violations against the Syrian people, yet he still envisions a role for Assad in Syria’s political future. And while the President rightfully drew parallels between Syria and Iran as partners in repression, no action has been taken to hold Ahmadinejad and Khamenei accountable for their brutality. We did not hear a plan to vigorously enforce all sanctions laws on the books to bring the greatest pressure possible on the Iranian and Syrian regimes.

“We did not hear a pledge from the President to cut off U.S. funding to a Palestinian Authority now aligned with Hamas, nor did we hear a pledge to veto the scheme to attain UN recognition of a Palestinian state without negotiating peace with Israel. I am also disappointed that the President failed to call on the Palestinian leadership to recognize Israel’s right to exist as a Jewish state, and instead imposed new pressure on Israel to make concessions on its borders.

“On Libya, after almost 60 days of U.S. involvement, we have no further clarity on our priorities, goals, and the anticipated extent of our commitment there. “I am deeply concerned that the President did not rule out providing aid to Egypt if the Muslim Brotherhood is part of the government. The U.S. should only provide assistance to Egypt after we know that Egypt’s new government will not include the Muslim Brotherhood and will be democratic, pro-American, and committed to abiding by peace agreements with Israel. Further, considering our own national debt, we cannot afford to forgive up to $1 billion of Egypt’s debt. “On the President’s proposal for Enterprise Funds in Egypt and Tunisia, we must keep in mind that the performance of such funds in Eastern Europe and South Africa has been mixed.

If approved, I will seek to require a portion of the profits generated be returned to the U.S. Treasury. “Going forward, I hope that the President will work closely with Congress to advance a comprehensive and consistent regional policy focused on protecting and promoting U.S. security

Three comments on the sanctioning of President Assad from the May 18 Post

Souri333 writes:

“The US obviously did not want to topple Assad. They just wanted to exploit the situation to create cards to play against him in future negotiations. The US thinks now that Assad will be weaker and thus more willing to give concessions. Assad is stubborn and he is not going to accept that. He is going to restore the balance by escalating the regional situation against the US interests.”

Abughassan writes:

“the sanctions will be seen as an escalation at a time when what is needed is dialogue. if that dialogue does not happen and the promised reform measures do not materialize, then we will all know that Bashar can not lead Syria since his legitimacy now is conditional upon enacting reform. Another problem with those symbolic sanctions is that they are not likely to change the regime’s behavior and can only serve to insult Bashar and make the regime less cooperative and more stubborn. Those sanctions make sense only if the US is actively working to remove the regime, so I am eager to see if that what is being cooked. The third problem with those sanctions is that they are very likely to complicate any future efforts to reduce tension and polarization in the region…”

Shai writes:

“I never suggested the international community should not pressure the Assad regime to make serious changes, reform, and lead Syria in the direction of a free and democratic society. But in some cases, it may be unwise to oust an existing regime, thinking whatever comes in its stead must be better. Clinton referred to Assad not long ago as a “reformer”. She didn’t anticipate what would occur thereafter, but she probably didn’t throw out this term accidentally. The Obama Administration may still prefer a Syria under Assad than either civil war, or some other form of dictatorship.”

George:

Obama clearly said “al-Assad can lead the transition.” The latter part of the same sentence is not important. The new US sanctions announced on the previous day was only symbolic and have no substance. So actually he endorsed al-Assad’s rule.

The call of general strike on last Wednesday ended in total failure, even miserable, and thus, exposed the UNPOPULARITY of anti-government movement inside Syria. It is time for protesters to go back home and to resume a normal life.

Comments (187)


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151. democracynow said:

Syria’s suffers ‘another bloody Friday’
Phil Sands
Last Updated: May 21, 2011

DAMASCUS // Anti-government demonstrations turned deadly again yesterday in Syria, with at least 34 people killed by security services, according to human rights activists.

Previous Fridays had seemed to weaken the protest movement, with thousands of dissidents and residents of restive neighbourhoods in detention, a communications blackout and military units deployed in strength to prevent public gatherings.

Yesterday, however, as anti-government demonstrations entered a third month, the number of protesters on the streets grew in strength, activists and analysts said, with rallies also spreading across the country.

A ring of suburbs around the capital all staged demonstrations yesterday – the first time they have done so on the same day,

footage posted online by activists showed. There were also rallies in the central cities of Homs and Hama, while others took place in the north, east, south and west of the country.

Compared to last Friday, when six demonstrators were killed – the lowest number of fatalities in weeks – by early yesterday evening at least 34 demonstrators, including a child, had died in shootings by the security services. The deaths occurred mostlyly in Homs

and Maaret al-Numan, a city midway between Hama and Aleppo, human rights activists said.

Two people were also killed in the region around Deraa, the focal point of the uprising that has gripped Syria since March 15. Syrian officials had said that army units were being pulled out of the area last week.

Human rights groups believe between 700 and 1,000 protesters have been killed since the uprising began, although those numbers cannot be independently confirmed and are disputed by the Syrian government.

Yesterday’s shootings – on a day described as “another bloody Friday” by one pro-democracy dissident – and the scale of protests posed serious questions over the effectiveness of government policy to quash dissent through a mixture of force and a promise of negotiations.

Hopes that such a “national dialogue”, as authorities have called the proposed talks, will actually happen now seem increasingly unrealistic, a civil rights campaigner said. The source added that room for compromise between the government and protesters in shrinking with each passing week.

“More and more people seem to be approaching the point where they feel they have nothing to lose by demonstrating,” he said, on condition of anonymity. “Every week the protesters feel the government will not make reforms and will not make the decisions necessary to calm the situation down and end it peacefully.”

In some of areas, supposedly brought back into line through a massive deployment of security units, protesters once again took to the more lightly policed streets.

This was the case in a number of working-class suburbs to the south of Damascus where protests resumed after weeks of quiet. Protesters’ demands in these areas have hardened from requests for political reforms and greater freedoms. Marching dissidents were heard yesterday chanting, “The people want to topple the regime.” Others simply shouted, “Leave”.

“The security thought they had many of these places under control but as soon as they leave a neighbourhood, the protesters return, and they seem to be even more active than before,” said Abdul Karim Rehawi, head of the Syrian Human Rights League.

Such resilience underlines the need to seek a political, not military, solution to the crisis, Mr Rehawi said, adding that the government should immediately begin a process of open political discussion involving all sectors of society.

“So far there have been consultations and meetings with some opposition figures but much more than that is now needed, and

urgently,” he said. “We have the same requests as we had weeks ago: release political prisoners, stop shooting, allow peaceful

demonstrations, and have real dialogue.”

Syrian officials have been adamant that the crisis is winding down, with pro-government figures dismissing reports of

demonstrations as lies manufactured by their enemies and spread by malevolent media networks.

State media did, however, acknowledge a dozen rallies yesterday.

“Gatherings of scores and hundreds of citizens took place in a number of provinces after Friday prayers, chanting for freedom, mostly dispersing after a short time,” the official news agency SANA reported.

It also reported that security force personnel and civilians had been shot at by “armed groups’ in Homs and near Idleb. Officials have consistently blamed the killings, including the death of more than 120 security service personnel, on Islamic terrorists with support from foreign countries.

That message is certainly believed by at least some Syrians, who talk of a plot by the country’s enemies to weaken Damascus. There are also significant fears, mainly among minority groups, that a sectarian civil war will break out if the largely secular government loses control. Syria is made of different sectarian and ethnic groups, with a Sunni Muslim majority.

Most Syrians are not taking part in demonstrations, and President Bashar al Assad, 11 years into his rule, still appears to enjoy a wide base of popular support.

That popularity, while real and widespread, is dwindling as the crisis continues, according to one Syrian political analyst, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

“The silent majority is still quiet which is taken as a sign of support for the president,” he said. “But I see indications that [support] is slowly starting to shift as doubts are settling it.

“It’s still not too late for him to keep that majority on his side but it will take decisive political reforms. Things cannot just be allowed to drift as they are. At the moment, there is no actual policy; it’s just crisis management that is failing to managing the crisis.”

psands@thenational.ae

http://www.thenational.ae/news/worldwide/middle-east/syrias-suffers-another-bloody-friday?pageCount=0

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May 21st, 2011, 1:31 am

 

152. Shami said:

Kanj,do you mean that 95 % of the syrian people are happy to be humiliated by a minority gang ?with mass corruption and mass deception ?that they agree that all top officiers are selected according to sectarian lines ? That iranian theocrats,that the iranian people hate, are brought to the centers of Syria in order to spread extremist views ?now enjoy the response !
And i request from you and alikes that you show your support for Asad regime once the road turns,especially in Aleppo and in Damascus.(amongst your 95 %)
We are in an historical process of change,this is a logic of history ,why do you fear democratic change ?
We will read carefuly what Syria Comment regime supporters would write after the end of Asad-Makhlouf era.

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May 21st, 2011, 2:04 am

 

153. Souri333 (formerly Souri) said:

137. daleandersen,

The only thing that sets the Nazi party apart from other fascist parties is its racism. The Nazi party without its racist ideas would be just another fascist party. Fascist parties are legal in most countries as far as I know.

The SSNP is a non-racist fascist party. The founder of the party criticized Hitler for his racism.

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May 21st, 2011, 3:35 am

 

154. John Khouri said:

Shami,

95% of syrians are humiliated by the murder of their own soldiers At the hands of juvenile thugs and extremists. Does the burning of government buildings and cars,, murder of army personnel, slayings of ordinary civilians by Islamic extremists, blocking roads to ordinary syrians to travel, not humiliate you? 95% of syrians are proud of their president and country, but are ashamed of the 5% of ignorant syrians like urself. Either you are with 95% of the Syrian population or ur against them? Make up ur mind . Love it or leave it 🙂

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May 21st, 2011, 3:56 am

 

155. syau said:

Shami,

You are floating in a state of delusion. No roads will be turning, apart from the road of instability and violence.

Bashar Assad and his army are regaining stability in the country.
There are still some persistant armed gangs who have yet to be apprended, but make no mistake, they will be. Once they are behind bars and stability is secured, reforms will kick in and the country will continue to prosper.

Open your eyes and see this revolution for what it is.

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May 21st, 2011, 4:14 am

 

156. John khouri said:

syau –

Shami, nz and aboudi must be I’n another world . They just can’t seem to realise that the circus revolution has run out of steam and is rejected by a great majority of syrians. They remind me of the harriri clan and march 14 camp I’n Lebanon , who waited And begged for American assisstance and sold their souls for the sake of a few dollars.

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May 21st, 2011, 4:29 am

 

157. syau said:

John Khouri,

The only way I can see it is that when someone feels they are losing grip on a situation based on a lie, they will clutch at straws and try anything to continue on with the delustion they are living in.

If they actually saw the revolution for what it was and spoke to the real citizens of Syria, they will know how things stand and the detest people have for the ‘revolutionists’ causing all this trouble.

The March 14 psycho’s are still at it and have their hands deep in this violent revolution.

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May 21st, 2011, 4:45 am

 

158. Aboud said:

From AP

“Also Friday, leading Sunni Muslim cleric Sheik Karim Rajeh, the imam of Damascus’s Al-Hassan mosque, said he will no longer lead Friday sermons because security forces have been preventing people from going to prayers. ”

Disgraceful. In over 1400 years of the existence of Islam, this is the first time any Muslim had been forbidden from going out and praying. Not even the Israelis did that to the Palestinians. Shameful. But then, what do you expect from a regime whose supporters consist of rape-fantasists.

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May 21st, 2011, 5:51 am

 

159. Souri333 (formerly Souri) said:

Aboud,

This Islamist cleric was on the side of the protesters since day 1 and he was one of those secretly asking their followers to participate in the rebellion. The government was probably unable to depose him because they feared the reaction of his community. By resigning, he has done the government a great favor.

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May 21st, 2011, 6:03 am

 

160. syau said:

The truth of the situation struck a chord as it seems. As they say, the truth hurts.

As disgusting is it is, it is what happened. If it escaped your memory, an apprehended gang member confessed to such intentions. Luckily neither they nor the ones in Tal Kalakh were able to live out their fantasies.

What’s disgusting is the ‘revolution’ fanatics who are defending the abhorrent violence, the murders, mutilations intentions of rape and destruction of public and private property.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG_aqGzTFzk
The situation in Tal Kalakh, residents accounts prior and post the army intervention. The situation I was advised about regarding the attempted rapes, that was from a source in Tal Kalakh.

As for #157, What a laughable claim. The government has never nor will it ever prevent people from prayer, after all, they are not Islamists to have such a disgusting sectarian streak within their sick minds.

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May 21st, 2011, 6:49 am

 

161. Souri333 (formerly Souri) said:

Syria-news.com is gradually becoming more open about its support of the rebellion. It is run by Nidal Maalouf, a young man who is commonly accused of being pro-government, but he is not. He is very anti-government and the fact that he is gradually becoming open about this means either that the secret police are too busy to deal with him now or that there is something changing in the Syrian media.

http://www.syria-news.com/index.php

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May 21st, 2011, 6:49 am

 

162. Aboud said:

@158

And now it is those oh so evil Friday prayer imams who are part of the nefarious plots against junior. Seriously, how many enemies does Mr Paranoid eye doctor think he has? Not even Batman and Supereman had so many enemies that changed on a weekly basis. Bashar-Man, whose God-like powers consist of the amazing ability to bend reality, so that what happens is the exact opposite of what he says.

As to the supposed rapes in Telkelakh, if such a thing had even remotely occurred, those liars on Syrian TV and Dunya would have been all over it. But even they know they can’t get away with a lie of such magnitude. It takes a special kind of perverted mind to repeat such claims with a straight face. Apparently, such minds are in abundance on this forum.

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May 21st, 2011, 7:00 am

 

163. Souri333 (formerly Souri) said:

I think this is the opposition demo that was mentioned on Barada TV:

http://www.chamtimes.com/73272.html

This will be the first legal opposition demonstration. Even if the demonstration draws few people, it will be a good way to divide the rebellion. It is sad that this step comes late. The government should give licenses even to those who are demanding to topple the regime if they ask. It is better to draw as many people as possible away from the radical and violent elements. At least these demonstrations will be under the government control and their size and duration can be controlled. Even their slogans and demands can be negotiated and altered.

The Islamists will never ask for a license because that would expose them and expose their real face. Those who will ask for a license are the young frustrated people. The government should not be afraid of those people. It must attract them away from the Islamists. It is possible to reach a sensible deal with those young non-Islamist people, so why not do that and embarrass the Islamists and their foreign sponsors?

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May 21st, 2011, 7:08 am

 

164. syau said:

If the apprehended gang members do confess on tv, then you will probably see it.
Otherwise, I dont think anyone would want to make public knowledge of such and abhorrent attempt at rape in a school, after all, who would send their children to school with that threat looming.

Now that the revolution violence comming to an end thanks to Bashar and the Syrian army, people in Syria are finally able to return to some kind of normalcy.

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May 21st, 2011, 7:15 am

 

165. Aboud said:

An hour ago I was out getting a new lock for a bedroom door, near the old clock in downtown Homs. A demonstration was in progress, easily several thousand people.

The security guys wore black, and consisted mostly of scared skinny kids who didn’t seem to know how to hold their batons. They didn’t present an imposing or intimidating sight. In fact one can only feel sorry for them, obviously kids who wanted to get through their obligatory army service with as little trouble as possible, and instead ended up on the wrong side of the most momentous events in their country’s history.

@163

“If the apprehended gang members do confess on tv, then you will probably see it.”

Yes, because we all know that the highest standards of credibility and integrity are confessions broadcast on Syrian TV. Seriously who in God’s name is running Bashar’s propaganda? Because from the ineptitude we’ve seen, he must be a secret mole planted by the Bandar/Harriri/Salafi/Zionist/International Evil League of Rapists That Never Were Coalition Against Bashar-Man.

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May 21st, 2011, 7:29 am

 

166. syau said:

No, the integrity and credibility of Al Jazeera surpasses any other news station by far. They have so many true accounts and eyewitnesses, their stories must be true, after all, it is abu Mohamad and others alike they are talking to. They even aired a video of a fake funeral with the coffins flipping through the air and didnt even notice it. So I think they win the award.

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May 21st, 2011, 7:41 am

 

167. John Khouri said:

ABOUD –

I WAS NEAR THE CLOCK TOWER WITH MY COUSINS 1 HOUR AGO AND I DIDNT SEE SUCH A THING. U MUST BE ABU ABDO OR ABU HAYDAR FROM ALJAZEERA, WITH UR EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS. THE OLD AND NEW CLOCK TOWERS HAVE BEEN FREE FROM THUGS FOR THE PAST 3WEEKS. WHAT WAS THE NAME OF THE SHOP U BOUGHT UR BEDROOM LOCK FROM?

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May 21st, 2011, 7:59 am

 

168. JOHN KHOURI said:

ABOUD , NZ , DEMOCRACY NOW , SHAMI , ATTASI –

HAVE A LOOK AT THIS VIDEO SHOT IN IDLEB. CAN U COUNT THE NUMBER OF MACHETES, KNIVES, BATTONS, SHARP OBJECTS, THAT ARE BEING CARRIED BY THESE “PEACEFUL REVOLUTIONISTS”? AFTER U FINISH COUNTING MAYBE 20+ WEAPONS THAT WERE USED AGAINST THE SYRIAN SECURITY FORCES, U WILL BE ABLE TO UNDERSTAND WHY THEY WERE SHOT AT YESTERDAY. REMEMBER THE RULES OF ENGAGEMENT. IF A SECURITY OFFICER’S LIFE IS IN DANGER, HE HAS THE RIGHT TO PROTECT HIMSELF

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May 21st, 2011, 8:09 am

 

169. Aboud said:

Some names are so generic on this forum it’s laughable. I don’t know what the name of the shop was, if you’ve ever been to that area in your life you’d know there are dozens of places that sell such stuff (95 liras for a hammer, 55 liras for the lock, 35 liras for the taxi back home which I rounded up to 45 liras).

The entire downtown market was shut down, and I barely had enough time to buy a lock before that shop shut down. There were several thousand people gathered near the Grand Mosque. This was between 1 and 2 o’clock.

The police had shut down the roads between the new and old clocks. The Syrian people are the bravest in the world. Despite brutal crackdowns, they continue to turn out in droves to fight for their freedoms.

Also people, learn not to use caps, it just shows how hysterical you are.

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May 21st, 2011, 8:11 am

 

170. John Khouri said:

ABOUD –

YOU HAVE JUST PROVEN TO EVERYONE ON SYRIA COMMENT, THAT YOU ARE THE ABU HAYDAR FROM AL JAZEERA 🙂 SHOPS IN HOMS DO HAVE NAMES. I THINK U HAVE JUST SHOWED YOUR TRUE COLOURS. YOU DONT LIVE IN SYRIA AND U HAVE NO CLUE ABOUT WHAT IS HAPPENING IN SYRIA OR HOMS. THE SHOPS ARE OPEN AS NORMAL. I WAS AT THE BLUE STONE CAFE IN HOMS 1 HOUR AGO. I DIDNT C NO SHOPS CLOSED OR ANYTHING ABNORMAL. ABOUD, GET BACK TO PLAYING UR PLAYSTATION GAMES.

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May 21st, 2011, 8:20 am

 

171. Mina said:

Aboud, 164,
no kidding, you wrote a post at 5:51 and at 7:00 and 7:29 and in between you were in downtown Homs! Just two weeks ago you were writing from Lebanon, if I’m right…

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May 21st, 2011, 8:21 am

 

172. John Khouri said:

MINA –

GIVE ABOUD SOME TIME. HE IS PROBABLY ON GOOGLE TRYING TO FIND NAMES OF SHOPS IN HOMS THAT SELL LOCKS HHAHAHAHAHA. GIVE ABOUD A FEW MINUTES AND HE WILL COME BACK WITH A NAME OR 2 OF THE SHOPS IN HOMS. ABOUD OWNS A PLANE. HE CAN FLY FROM COUNTRY TO COUNTRY ON A DAILY BASIS

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May 21st, 2011, 8:38 am

 

173. Revlon said:

93. Dear Souri333 (formerly Souri) : Thank you for this posting and your comment.

قالت صحيفة “النهار” اللبنانية الصادرة اليوم إن النظام السوري سلّم باريس وواشنطن ، عبر سفيريهما في دمشق، برنامجا إصلاحيا يتضمن “خططاً وأفكاراً إصلاحية حقيقية وجذرية يبدأ فوراً، ويشمل مختلف المناحي العامة وصولا الى سنة 2014 عندما ستسمح السلطات بترشح السوريين لمنصب الرئاسة، فاتحة الباب أمامهم للمرة الأولى منذ ما يقارب نصف قرن”. وبحسب الصحيفة ، فإن مسؤولا أمنياً وسياسياً رفيع المستوى استقبل قبل نحو أسبوع السفيرين الفرنسي والاميركي في دمشق اريك شوفالييه وروبرت فورد معاً، وسلمهما الأفكار الرئيسية لخطة الإصلاح، مؤكداً التزام دمشق اياها كما هو مكتوب في الوثائق.
وأضافت الصحيفة نقلا عن مصدرها في دمشق القول إن السفيرين نقلا إلى حكومتيهما مضمون الاجتماع الذي انعقد مع المسؤول السوري الرفيع المستوى، ثم أطلعا عدداً من زملائهما الغربيين، ومن هؤلاء السفير التركي في دمشق عمر أنهون.
“Presidential elections” are cosmetic reform because I don’t think Assad is leaving office soon, and I don’t think he should. We need to see real reforms”

I say:
Assuming that this news is credible, I would like to share with you my observations and comments:
– The “reform program” was announced in a non-Syrian paper. Specifically, It was a medium owned by anti-regime, March 14th coalition, championed by Mr. 7ariri
– The news of this reform program was broken to the Ambassadors of the same countries who have been considered to be backing the conspirators!
Here are my comments:
– The regime preferred foreign media to its own!
– The regime preferred to break the news to representatives of other nations instead of its own.
– You used the expression “cosmetic” to describe the proposed open presidential elections. I agree with your assessment of regime’s ill-intentions! However, the proper description would be “deceitful”!
– Last and not least; It has been my experience that all “reforms” introduced by this regime were upgrades of old repressive practices. I yet to see evidence to the contrary.

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May 21st, 2011, 8:52 am

 

174. why-discuss said:

Abboud
I think you live in Malmoe, Sweden and you are a close friend to the MB nerd. You use Google Earth to move around, this is why you’re sometimes in Lebanon, sometimes in Homs and sometimes at IKEA. Maybe this is where you bought the bedroom lock.

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May 21st, 2011, 8:55 am

 

175. Revlon said:

According to Reuters, at least 44 martyrs fell victims to regime crackdown since Friday.

AlFati7a upon their souls,
May God bless their families with solace, and empower their families with patience.

حركة سوريا شباب من أجل الحرية Youth Syria For Freedom
منظمة: ارتفاع عدد القتلى في احتجاجات الجمعة بسوريا الى 44 | أخبار الشرق الأوسط | Reuters
ara.reuters.com
عمان (رويترز) – قالت المنظمة الوطنية لحقوق الانسان في سوريا يوم السبت ان قوات الامن السورية قتلت بالرصاص 44 مدنيا على الاقل في اعتداءات على المظاهرات المطالبة بالديمقراطية التي اندلعت في شتى أنحاء سوريا
about an hour ago

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May 21st, 2011, 8:57 am

 

176. Aboud said:

Mina, I’d appreciate it if you could point to the post where I said I was in Lebanon.

Mr All-Caps-Generic-Name, the Blue Stone is in Hamadiya, far away from the old clock and new clock areas *facepalm*. From there it would have been impossible for you to see or hear anything from the area around the Jamee3 Al Kabeer.

Today at noon it was overflowing with protestors. They may have stayed half an hour, an hour, but it is the habit of the demos these days to make their presence known, and then disperse before the security can get themselves organized. A very clever approach.

Since somehow someone has gotten the impression that I’m from Lebanon, I’ll share with you the front page of today’s weekly classified paper, Al-Wasila. As those of you familiar with Syria know, this is a paper that is distributed every Saturday, with specific editions for each province, so the paper that gets distributed in Homs is different from Aleppo and Damascus.

Today’s front page is an ad for a Samsung 32 inch LCD, with the image of a female boxer. I invite anyone here who actually lives in Homs to tell us what the advertised price is (quite reasonable, I’d have bought one if I hadn’t gotten an LG TV just two weeks ago).

I love this obsession with where Aboud lives. Even if Aboud lived on Mars, over 960 Syrians are dead due to the unparalleled brutality of the Baathist regime, and over 10,000 are in jail for wanting nothing more than their freedoms.

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May 21st, 2011, 8:58 am

 

177. Mina said:

My apologize, it is in the post you wrote that day:
May 4th, 2011, 8:29 am

about Fisk’s article on Telkhala, where I got confused and thought you were in Lebanon (it is Fisk who was in northern Lebanon that day).

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May 21st, 2011, 9:07 am

 

178. why-discuss said:

REVlon

Not a single security officer?

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May 21st, 2011, 9:09 am

 

179. Aboud said:

@176 MINA

Yes, and I took Fisk to task for his absurd reporting about Telkelakh. 40 people did not die there, and 40 people did not die even during last week’s invasion.

Still waiting for people who take their lunches in Hamadiya to let us know the price on Samsung’s great new 32 LCD sale…..waiting….waiting….yes, it takes a bit of time to call up your Baathist friends in Homs….waiting…..

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May 21st, 2011, 9:12 am

 

180. Revlon said:

General strike in Homs today, in mourning of martyrs of Friday’s protests.

This strike seems spontaneous, and thus reflects the spead of outrage to the more economically priviliged populace of the city.

This video shows the otherwise busiest quarters of downtown Homs City.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5Keq6u0WD0&feature=player_embeddedBottom of Form

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May 21st, 2011, 9:12 am

 

181. Revlon said:

Maher Asad 4th Division Forces demonstrated in Saqba, Damascus:
They chanted:
Abu 7afez! Abu 7afez!
Birro7, biddam, nafeddeeka ya Bashar (We sacrifice blood and souls for Bashar)

Indeed, they do! They have been sacrificing hundreds of souls and blood of civilians!

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May 21st, 2011, 9:24 am

 

182. John khouri said:

Abu haydar ( aboud ),

Ill take my caps locked off for u. Maybe it’s blinding ur eyes from the constant late nights u have on ur playstation. Congratulations on taking 1hour to prove that ur on the moon and not I’n Homs . Great evidence u bring out. A front page advertisement on today’s newspaper? What a genius you are mr haydar. Keep up the great work boy 🙂

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May 21st, 2011, 9:37 am

 

183. syau said:

Revlon,

Did they show you their military ID cards or their metal tags? Please enlighten me as to how you know they are 4th division.

The army personnel have sacrificed their blood for the stability of the Syrian people, many have died in battle, have been ambushed or have been murdered by the ‘peaceful protesters’ of this revolution.

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May 21st, 2011, 9:43 am

 

184. Aboud said:

So the person @181 has been provided with irrefutable proof that his assumptions are flat out wrong. In addition, he has no way to back up his own claims. It’s a pattern we have grown familiar with when dealing with Baathists and the Syrian media.

Boy to Dad: “Daddy, where do liars go? To hell?”

Dad: “No son, they go on Syrian state TV”

The price is 17,999 Syrian Liras. Damn, why did I have to buy that 23 inch LG…..

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May 21st, 2011, 10:09 am

 

185. why-discuss said:

Abboud

Because you want to enjoy AlJazeera in full scale!

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May 21st, 2011, 11:18 am

 

186. Sisyphus said:

O.k. why has the last post disappeared?? The one about the protests not ending? There were at least 10 comments on it??

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May 21st, 2011, 3:36 pm

 

187. Dentist said:

SHami,
Do you prefer Alshallah-Ghrewati Era?????or do you want the army to be sunni as well????there is only 1 alawi Minister in the government and you call it a sectarian??????open your eyes and stop believing in change unless it is for the better not for an Islamic Monarchy…

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May 26th, 2011, 4:19 pm

 

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