Seymour Hersh: “We may never find out who ordered Hariri assassination”

Seymour Hersh was interviewed by Ghassan Ben Jeddo on Al-Jazeera Sunday evening. Here is the rough translation from Arabic sent to me by Alex:

1)       American intelligence sources told him that Lebanese AND middle Eastern parties opposed to Syria misled the Unites States and France with false evidence (or manufactured evidence) designed to implicate Syria in the Killing.

2)       His sources at the UN tell him there is no evidence against Syria yet. That the Hariri killing was very carefully planned and executed, and that we might never find out who ordered that assassination.

3)       Prince Bandar is very ambitious … Seymour is not sure if the Prince wants to be the next King, but the prince has significant influence worldwide and is spending a lot of money to help this administration finance Anti Syria operations in Lebanon and elsewhere. Prince Bandar’s main American contact is Vice President Cheney… their meetings last long hours.

4)       Sunni “moderate” Arab states indeed asked the United States to attack (not invade) Iran.

5)       Prince Bandar is coordinating with the Americans to attack  تهاجم)) Syria and Iran (not sure Attack was the English word .. I heard the Arabic translation:  His purpose of the Iran visit was to isolate Syria.

6)       Some in Israel want to work with Nasrallah, instead of trying to finish him.

7)       The US is financing the Seniora government and its allies through Bandar money .. and through 9 billion dollars that was taken from Iraq. Samir Jeajea is getting some of that money.

8)       Jeajea was invited to Washington for meetings with the Bush administration, but there was too much opposition to that visit. It was canceled.

9)       There will be an American Syrian rapprochement … but only after 2009 (Hersh said it with certainty)

10)   The Bush administration is not hoping for a regime change in Syria.

Jim Lobe in his Tough Week for Bush's Middle East Strategy, quotes my analysis of the Arab League summit.

"King Abdullah has come to the conclusion that only Arab unity can restore the regional balance of power [that has been] so skewed in Iran's favor by the destruction of Saddam's Arabist regime," wrote Joshua Landis, a Syria expert at University of Oklahoma, on his blog. "To do this, Saudi Arabia must reach an accommodation with Syria, Hezbollah, Hamas; it cannot destroy them, as the U.S. recommends."

Beirut's French language newspaper, L'Orient-Le Jour, picked up the same quote in its editorial: Les tensions avec Ryad mettent Washington en difficulté au Proche-Orient (Thanks Nur)

"Selon Joshua Landis, un expert du Center of Peace Studies de l'Université de l'Oklahoma, en qualifiant d'« illégitime » la présence de troupes américaines en Irak, le roi Abdallah s'est posé comme le champion d'un nouveau panarabisme, destiné à contenir la montée de l'influence de l'Iran dans la région. Le roi est déjà parvenu à la conclusion que le plan du président George W. Bush en Irak était voué à l'échec et cherche à éloigner la Syrie de l'Iran pour ramener le régime de Damas dans le giron arabe, explique cet expert. « Le roi Abdallah a annoncé qu'il cherchait à adopter une nouvelle politique irakienne, une politique destinée à une nouvelle phase postaméricaine en Irak et une politique qui doit être coordonnée avec la Syrie », ajoute-t-il, rappelant que le souverain saoudien a eu deux entretiens avec le président syrien Bachar el-Assad en marge du sommet de Ryad."

Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal, met with Bush last May to press Saudi concerns. "We have two nightmares," Saud told the president, according to Turki. "One is that Iran will develop a nuclear bomb, and the other is that America will take military action to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear bomb." (This quote is from Christopher Dickey's excellent article in Newsweek: "How the Saudi king, disillusioned with Bush, is trying to save the Arabs.")

Jim Lobe also quotes retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey, a vocal supporter of the strategy who had previously been upbeat about the military situation.

McCaffrey just returned from a visit to both Afghanistan and Iraq, where he met with top U.S. diplomats and military and intelligence officials. He wrote that the Iraqi population "is in despair" and expressed consternation at the resilience of both the insurgents and the militias.

"Although we have arrested 120,000 insurgents (hold 27,000) and killed some huge number of enemy combatants (perhaps 20,000 plus) – the armed insurgents, militias and al Qaeda in Iraq without fail apparently regenerate both leadership cadres and foot soldiers. Their sophistication, numbers, and lethality go up – not down – as they incur these staggering battle losses," he wrote, adding that they are "in some ways more capable of independent operations" than the Iraqi army. He also warned that the U.S. military was "in a position of strategic peril" as a result of its Iraq intervention.

Anthony Shadid is excellent as ever in this article:
Driven by War to a No Man's Land in Jourdan
Lives of Palestinian Refugees From Iraq Reflect Six Decades of Dispossession

Comments (83)


Pages: « 1 [2] Show All

51. K said:

Ausamaa,

What do you mean, “your aim is Syria”?

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 3:14 pm

 

52. Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Lebanon: Hariri Murder a Mystery said:

[...] American blogger Joshua Landis writes that the perpetrators of the February 14, 2005, Hariri assassination may never be tracked down. “His (Seymour Hersh – an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author) sources at the UN tell him there is no evidence against Syria yet. That the Hariri killing was very carefully planned and executed, and that we might never find out who ordered that assassination,” writes Landis. Amira Al Hussaini [...]

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 4:23 pm

 

53. idaf said:

Dear K.. what if they were lying to you in the first place?! Let me elaborate..

You stated that the reason for your animosity against Syria/Syrians/Syrian regime emerged from your family’s suffering of Syrian bombing during the civil war. First, I acknowledge that during several occasions in the civil war, some of the Syrian military operations were indiscriminating between militias and civilian areas. Moreover, I acknowledge that many of Syrian servicemen and security personnel have exploited their positions and abused Lebanese civilians in different manners (as they did and still doing –to a smaller extent today- in Syria, similar to what military men do in Iraq, do in Israel, did in Bosnia, Kosovo, Vietnam, Korea, Germany, Turkey, India, China.. etc.). Many of these incidents you have in your memory have surely shaped your hatred and thirst for revenge from Syria. However, you have to acknowledge that the end goal (and actually the final outcomes) of the Syrian military intervention in Lebanon was ending the fighting between the different warlords and militias and stabilizing Lebanon (for Syria’s interest). Which Syria managed to achieve successfully at the end. The over-handedness and mistakes committed during the war by Syrian elements in Lebanon are regrettable and will stay a shameful stain on Syria’s name for a long while (despite the fact that Syria as a country/people had nothing to do with them). You should not take these mistakes or crimes personally, they weren’t. You should not even take them from a sectarian point of view. They weren’t committed against your family because you were Maronites, Christian, Druze or whatever. During the toughest times in the civil war, the Syrian military had adopted the strategy of “we will forcefully stop any militia attacking any other militia or sect in Lebanon” (this included attacking Christian militias as well as Druze and Shiite militias). During the civil war in Lebanon, the Syrian military was balanced in its over-handedness (however, the militias aligned with Israel might’ve taken harder pouncing for obvious reasons). Every militia (save the Lebanese baath militia maybe) had its share of the Syrian force when it decided to attack some other militia, or kill residents of other sects and neighborhood during some periods of the war. Several years ago, a Lebanese politician best described Syrian intervention in the Lebanese civil war: “we were like siblings fighting and punching each other blind fully, until the mother [Syria] came and slapped each of us on the face until we stopped fighting and sat and talked together”!

My, and most Syrians’ problem with many of the Lebanese people is the sectarian/tribal mindset you have in assessing the Syrian role. Syrian forces did not “bomb your home” because it was your home, or because it was a Christian home. Moreover, it is highly possible that it might not have been a Syrian shell that fell over it. The Lebanese and Palestinian militias were attacking by proxy then and they were switching alliances sometimes twice a day. However, the warlords that emerged from the civil war alive, have created a culture of blaming everything on Syria in front of their constituencies (They needed a scapegoat for not delivering their promises to those constituencies of “obliterating the enemy sect”). In Lebanon which have a intrinsic tribal and sectarian society, a culture of “blaming it on Syria” have been created and was amplified to limitless proportions. Of course, the Syrian security apparatus, being a Middle Eastern one, was happy with this reputation when it was functioning in Lebanon. It just made life easier for them in over there.

Now back to the future.. I’ll repeat what I said before in this blog: there are evidence suggesting that Syria might have committed some of the bombing and crimes in Lebanon. However, there are more evidence suggesting that Syria’s innocent and is being framed. It is this prevalent culture in Lebanon of “everything is Syria’s fault until proven otherwise” is what’s damaging to Lebanon more than to Syria. If I was the head of the Mossad, I would not think twice of exploiting it fully to achieve my goals in Lebanon or score points on Syria. This culture of “blaming it on Syria” has to go for Lebanon’s sake. Of course external powers, Lebanese warlords, politicians and people manipulating the media will not allow this as this culture is there raison d’être.

Unfortunately, in Lebanon, your patriotism is defined by the amount of hate you express or practice against “others”. For some Lebanese, these “others” are Syria/Syrians to other Lebanese it’s Israel, to most Lebanese it’s one or two other sects in Lebanon. From your last post to Ausama, it’s clear that you are blinded with your hate to Syria (which is defining you on the political spectrum of the Lebanese blame culture as a “patriotic Christian”). You are proud of this status. You are even willing to overlook, forgive and justify destruction of your country by Israel because as you put it: you or your sect weren’t the targets. It does not matter that 3000 Lebanese lost their lives last summer and the tens of thousands of devastated lives and destroyed homes. You prefer to keep your mind focused on something that happened 20 years ago or more to your own sect or neighborhood. You have to get revenge for that, even if it takes you a life time. You were fed this culture of hate and revenge since childhood and you’re satisfied with it. It defines you as a patriot which you are proud of in your community.

Lastly K, I apologize if my comments seemed harsh, patronizing or presumptuous. That was not my intention. Please don’t take them personally as they weren’t intended to be that way either. These are my observations based on communicating with the tens of Lebanese friends I have had during my life (from all sects). Most agree with me on this analysis (actually many have made many of these comments about their own society and people).

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 4:25 pm

 

54. idaf said:

Ehsani2, what’s your take on this?

Syrian Economy Draws More Foreign Investment
By Hassen al-Shami

In the last seven years, Syria has adopted more open economic policies by implementing reform and restructuring programs appropriate to the country’s economic, social, and social situation. Syria has not adopted ready-made reform programs suggested by the IMF and the World Bank, despite the fact that it has taken advantage of the IMF and the World Bank in the developing countries.

As a result of this economic reform program, Syria has witnessed a comprehensive progress in different sectors, and its revenues have been geographically distributed on all towns and rural areas.

Perhaps what singles out the Syrian experience in reform is that it has borne fruit in a record time – seven years – while experts of similar programs in developing countries estimate the period needed should be between 10 and 15 years. On the other hand, some observers of the economic situation in Syria think that the outcome of the reforms could have been realised in an even shorter time; what caused the delay was the foreign pressure exercised on the nation as a result of its constant Arab nationalist positions.

Moreover, some Syrian economic experts hold that Syria has realised much of its reform programs despite all the obstacles of put in its way by of some EU countries. This situation pushed Syria to diversify its economic relations by directing them towards the east: China, Iran, India, and others, apart from Arab countries, and especially the Gulf States. In fact, trade between Syria and the Gulf States over the last two years has increased by 30-40%, according to Abdullah al-Dardari, the Syrian Vice Prime Minister.

Growth Rate Increase
The Government has announced that these reforms have contributed to the growth of the country’s economy by 5.2% in 2006 against 4.5% in 2005. Syria has allowed the establishment of private banks and insurance companies, and lifted the restrictions on imports, but the public sector is still predominant.

Al-Dardari clarified that it would take some time to train the personnel and set up a market for the treasury bonds following the issue of the new laws, stressing the Government’s intention to reform the Public Treasury and deal with the problem of government subsidy to goods, which constitutes a large proportion of the budget. According to him, the Government still has to deal with the problem of the public sector reform and subsidies in the two years of 2007 and 2008.

But al-Dardari insisted that subsidies would not be cancelled; they would rather be redistributed to assist low-income households, not rich ones. He said that subsidies would be redistributed through payment of cash to all Syrian families – poor ones would get a higher share – as well as by improving free health and education services.

The Failure of Isolation Policy
On the level of Syrian-European relations, Mr al Dardari confirmed that Europe had to open a dialogue with Syria if it wanted to play a positive, constructive role in the Middle East; but added that the EU has fortunately already reached that decision. He told the media the European countries became convinced of the failure of the isolation policy, and have thus ended it. He said that intensive dialogue was being held with separate European countries, and Syria’s bilateral relations with them were developing at the level of technical, economic, and scientific co-operation.

Concerning preparation for joining the World Trade Organisation, a workshop was organised a couple of weeks ago, under the title “Towards achieving harmony between Syrian local laws and the WTO’s rules”. This workshop has confirmed the Syrian Government’s direction to work on facing challenges and answer several requirements, including ensuring the existence of a transparent legal framework in order to benefit from the opportunities available to have access to markets.

Mr al-Dardari affirmed that the tenth 5-year plan is a tool to achieve the best living standard for the Syrian citizens, and that freeing trade is a tool of this 5-year plan aimed at creating a balanced economic and social progress and promoting Syria’s position politically and economically.

He also said that since the implementation of the Great Arab Free Trade Zone, the rate of economic growth rose to 5.1% in 2006, predicting that it would attain 5.6%. He pointed out that the deregulation of trade in early 2005 was accompanied by the increase of non-oil exports from 213 to 327 billion Syrian Pounds. Such a rise has contributed to the decrease of the budget deficit from 78 to 24 billion Syrian Pounds in 2006, despite the decline of the oil imports value.

The Deputy President of Ministers’ Council for Economic Affairs clarified that all that has resulted in the resumption of the budget surplus after it had been in deficit in 2004 and 2005. The trade balance deficit went down from 211 billion Syrian Pounds in 2005 to 189 billion Syrian Pounds in 2006.

Al-Dardari pointed out that the rise of the processed farming exports contributed to the decrease of the overall rate of unemployment according to the indices of the World Labour Organisation. He clarified that the Syrian exports of fruits and vegetables reached 800,000 tons, with a net value of 12 billion Syrian Pounds, and that Syria imported 800,000 tons, with a net value less than 7 billion Syrian Pounds.

The Syrian GNDP is estimated at US $38 billion, and according to economic experts it could attain US $50 billion. Mr Dardari commented by saying, “If the Syrian economy wants to have a regional role after the change of the surrounding circumstances, the Syrian GNDP will have to be equal to that of Jordan and Lebanon together, and this means that our GNDP will attain US $47 billion by 2020, which requires a 7-percent annual growth rate.”

To conclude, we may say that the reform programs adopted by the Syrian Government have achieved a comprehensive economic boom just a few years after their implementation. And seeing that reform was built on durable development, the real fruits are yet to come when Syria takes an advanced economic position among the neighbouring countries and turn into a regional economic centre.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 4:32 pm

 

55. Alex said:

Dear Pascal,

I know exactly who Elias Sarkis was. But since we are not here to discuss him, I will simplify what I like about him:

1) He was a decent honest man, he did not have personal ambitions, neither power nor financial.

2) He was wise, not angry and loud.

Today, you are led by a team of old war lords and corrupt Saudi appointed men, most of whom are not respectable. period.

The more respectable team of Nasrallah, Hoss, and Aoun, are not Syria’s enemies.

You are kidding yourself if you think that what is driving you is the anger for the fate of “hundreds of Lebanese prisoners” in Syria … I don’t see the same anger over what Aoun and Geagea produced … I know some of you acknowledge their mistake, but they forgive Geagea much more easily even though his crimes were much bigger.

You are driven by hate, anger, need for revenge for whatever Syria did wrong in your assessment. You think it is alright to feel that way. It is not. But you are free to participate in driving your beautiful country into the wall… because you need to punish Syria at any cost.

You know, Catholics in the United States did not become hostages to their need for revenge when their hero President Kennedy was assassinated. They understood that politics is a dirty game. Imagine if America’s Catholics had your state of mind.

Dear k,

What you said is reasonable. I understand that you are more genuinely driven by your hopes for a more democratic Middle East, and not only by hate for Syria or the Syrian regime.

But I assure you that there will be no such thing in the Middle East for many years. Not in Syria, not In Egypt, and not in Saudi Arabia.

So what do you do in the mean time? … continue to boycott Syria because it is led by “Bashar the thug”?

I know of some decent senior officials in both Syria and Egypt. They prefer to work within the System rather than to fight it in a losing battle. The System is the whole country … not only the corrupt regime in each country.

As for your total rejection to what sounds like conspiracy theories. Please allow me to make twopoints:

1) Who says it is either Syria of Israel? there could be rifaat Assad who wanted to get Bashar in trouble and make him look like a foolish reckless leader who is not good for Syria or the stability of the Middle East (Arab/European concern). It could have been your wonderful warlords… pure murders who assassinated many other Lebanese politicians in the past for their own reasons. Are they pure saints now?

Or, yes it could have been Israel.

Israel would not do that you say?

1) Israel in the eighties planted a radio transmission device inside Libya that gave the Reagan administration the impression that Libya is planning some Anti America terrorist activities. Result … Reagan bombed Libya.

2) Israel probably did the Hindawi affair trick on Syria in the eighties … Syria was accused of attempting to plant a bomb on an El-Al airplane .. the most heavily guarded El-Al of all airlines!

Syria was boycotted (just like now) as a result of that impression .. until the end of the Reagan years. Here is what Chirac eventually admitted:

French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac later told the Washington Times that he thought it possible Israeli intelligence and anti-Assad Syrians could have been involved in the plot[citation needed]. According to Gordon Thomas’s book Gideon’s Spies: The Secret History of the Mossad, Mossad agents took advantage of Hindawi’s personal troubles with Anne Murphy, tricking him into carrying out a plot he believed was aimed against Israel, all the while planning for the discovery of the explosives before takeoff. Other possibilities have emerged that suggest that certain members of Syrian intelligence first named by Hindawi were Israeli spies themselves, allowing Israel to have prior knowledge of the plot[citation needed]. This would imply that both of Hindawi’s stories held some truth.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 4:48 pm

 

56. idaf said:

This is interesting.. the following story is about the inauguration -later tonight- of the Olympic Stadium in Aleppo by Asad and Turkish PM Erdogan. This story summarizes the status in Syria today, for the following reasons:

1-The “Aleppo Sports City” that’s being inaugurated tonight has been the milking cow for the many corrupt mayors, civil servants and Baath party members in Aleppo for the last 27 years. Billions of dollars have been wasted over the years on this massive project. Government after government and mayor after mayor in Aleppo have been milking it through dubious contracts to make money during their service. Finally after just less than 7 years of Bashar’s rule, it’s finally finished (well, it was rebuilt as the everything had to be destroyed because it was not built according to engineering standards). Many Aleppians I know can’t believe it. Most have seen this unfinished construction monument for years with no progress while they were growing up. It is older than most of the Aleppo’s young population. A common saying in Aleppo over the last 27 years has been: “The famous Aleppo citadel and the sport city are the 2 oldest preserved historical monuments in the city”. I have a friend in Aleppo telling me for the last 15 years now that he will only believe that things are progressing in Syria if this project moves ahead. This will no doubt score Bashar lots of points of trust and popularity in Aleppo. If anything, it proves that corruption is indeed being cracked down upon in their country.

2-The other part of this story is the strong message Bashar is sending to Erdogan and Turkey.. “I would prefer to enjoy a Syria-Turkey football match with you than discuss politics with the Lantos” (btw, Syrian authorities agreed to waive Visa requirements for Turks who want to come to Aleppo to watch the game. More Turkish tourists and businessmen in Aleppo). Bashar has decided to let the American delegation wait for him (maybe Lantos can enjoy shopping in the Hamidie souq meanwhile) and decided to do more important things: watch a friendly football match in another city. In contrast, a leader of any other “moderate” Arab regime would miss his mother’s funeral for a visit by a less important US delegation.

SYRIA-TURKEY: FIRST TOP LEVEL FOOTBALL MATCH BETWEEN THE TWO IN 56 YEARS

Aleppo, Syria, 3 April (AKI) – Top level teams from Syria and Turkey are set to meet Tuesday on the football field for the first time in over half a century in a match that symbolises closer ties between the two neighbours long strained by Damascus’ offering of sanctuary to Kurdish separatists. Syrian president Basher al-Assad and Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan are scheduled to attend the match between Turkey’s Fenerbahce and Syria’s al-Ittihad in Aleppo. The game will also serve to inaugurate a new stadium in the historic Syrian city.

Fenerbahce players were held up for more than an hour and a half by scores of Syrian fans welcoming them when they arrived at Aleppo’s airport on Monday. The Fenerbahce team handed out pamphlets printed with the greeting “Hello after 56 years” a reference to the last time Turkish and Syrian football teams played against each other at this level.

Tensions between Turkey and Syria almost turned to all out war in 1998 when the fugitive leader of the separatist PKK (Kurdistan Worker’s Party) Abdullah Ocalan operated from Syria from where his group launched cross border attacks into Turkey.

The relations improved when Syria forced Ocalan to leave in 1998. The Kurdish leader was eventually arrested by Turkish security forces when he left the Greek embassy in Nairobi in February 1999. He is currently imprisoned on Imrali Island in the Turkish Sea of Marmara where he is serving a life sentence.

Top level diplomatic visits between Turkey and Syria resumed in 2003 and the two countries signed a free trade agreement in 2005.

Damascus and Ankara agreed to wave vise requirements for Turkish fans wishing to travel to Syria for Tuesday’s match.

Al-Assad and Erdogan were scheduled to meet during the day before going to the stadium for the match which is set to kick-off at 19.45 local time.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 5:08 pm

 

57. Atassi said:

Alex said “You are driven by hate, anger, need for revenge for whatever Syria did wrong in your assessment. You think it is alright to feel that way. It is not. But you are free to participate in driving your beautiful country into the wall… because you need to punish Syria at any cost”

Alex,
You can’t deny anyone “Lebanese or Syrian” the feeling of anger for the wrongs done by the “Syrian regime”; they have the right to seek justice’s form the perpetrators.
Now, I can agree with your logic If, “and IF “We hear an apologies form the regime to the Lebanese people for all the mistakes done in the past.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 5:51 pm

 

58. Atassi said:

Pelosi tours Damascus, rebuffing criticism from Bush over Syria visit
By ZEINA KARAM

Associated Press Newswires

DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi toured Damascus on Tuesday, the highest-ranking American politician to visit Syria since relations began to deteriorate four years ago. President Bush criticized the trip, saying it sends mixed signals to President Bashar Assad.

The United States accuses Syria of interfering in Iraq and Lebanon and sponsoring terrorists — charges Syria denies. The Bush administration has resisted calls to open direct talks with Damascus on resolving the countries’ disputes.

Pelosi, D-Calif., is scheduled to meet Assad and other Syrian officials on Wednesday. She made no comment on arrival and headed for the Old City of Damascus where she toured the 8th-century Omayyad Mosque.

Pelosi draped a scarf over her head as she entered the historic mosque and stopped at a tomb inside the mosque said to contain the head of St. John the Baptist. She made the sign of the cross in front of the tomb. About 10 percent of Syria’s 18 million people are Christian.

In the nearby outdoor Bazouriyeh market, she chatted with Syrians, who offered her dates, in front of shops selling olive oil soaps, spices and herbs. At one point, she bought some coconut sweets and looked at Syrian carpets.

In Washington, Bush said visits to Syria by u.S. officials were “counterproductive.”

“A lot of people have gone to see President Assad … and yet we haven’t seen action. He hasn’t responded,” he said at a Rose Garden news conference.

He said Assad had not reined in violent elements of militant groups Hamas and Hezbollah as requested by the international community and had acted to destabilize the democratically elected government of Lebanon.

“Sending delegations doesn’t work. It’s simply been counterproductive,” Bush said.

Pelosi has shrugged off the criticism, pointing out that Republican members of Congress have also visited Syria. During a visit to neighboring Lebanon Monday, she said she considers the visits to be an “excellent idea” and was hopeful of rebuilding lost confidence between Washington and Damascus.

“We have no illusions but we have great hope,” she said.

Syria treated the visit as a diplomatic victory. State-run newspapers published news of Pelosi’s trip on their front pages, with one daily publishing a photograph of Pelosi next to the headline: “Welcome Dialogue.”

But there were some warnings against high expectations.

Syria’s ambassador to the United States, Imad Moustapha, described the visit as a “positive step” but said “it does not necessarily mean that the Bush administration would suddenly change its position” from Syria.

In comments to the state-run Al-Thawra daily published Tuesday, he said the visit should be a “reminder that even though we might disagree on politics, we should remain diplomatically engaged in dialogue to reach some understandings.”

Pelosi is traveling with a delegation of U.S. lawmakers, including the first Muslim member of Congress, Keith Ellison, D-Minn.

In Israel, Pelosi said she would tell Syrian leaders that Israel will talk peace with them only if Syria stops supporting Palestinian militants. She has said she will also talk to the Syrians about Iraq, their role in neighboring Lebanon and their support for Lebanon’s Hezbollah militants.

She accused the White House of singling out her Syria visit for criticism.

“It’s interesting because three of our colleagues, who are all Republicans, were in Syria yesterday and I didn’t hear the White House speaking out about that,” Pelosi said Monday, referring to the Sunday meeting of Reps. Frank Wolf, Joe Pitts and Robert Aderholt with Assad in Damascus.

“I think that it was an excellent idea for them to go,” said Pelosi. “And I think it’s an excellent idea for us to go, as well.”

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:07 pm

 

59. ausamaa said:

Attasi,

Are you really waiting for such an apology??

For your information, I think Syria gave that apology! When? During Bashar Al Assad famous speach before the Syrian Parliment in 2005 (the “Whatever we do they will say Not Enough” speach). He SAID that things were not good and correct in the relationship between Syria and Lebanon and they have to be corrected. He went on to say (which many people either did not notice, or did not hear or did not want to consider) that -and here take notice please- that WHEN Syria started to correct those things, THEN it was confronted by more ATTACKS. I believe him! Because when he became president, Syria had over 40,000 soldiers in Lebanon, when Syrian forces withdrew, the number was close to 16,000 only! So he WAS attempting to reduce Syrian presence there. Reduced it to 16,000 and more importantly by “pulling out” Hikmat Chihabi, Ghazi Kanaan and Khaddam. Not only that, but he was the FIRST Syrian President to make a State Visit to Lebanon, hence cutting out all historic BS about Syria not recognizing Lebanon as an independent state. And look at what reception and what encouragement he got from certain Lebanese.

But some of our Lebanese brothers refuse to even consider such talk. They want to defeat and conquer and liberate Syria instead..

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:27 pm

 

60. G said:

[...deleted by blog admin..]

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:46 pm

 

61. Alex said:

Atassi,

I agree with you but I have some reservations

1) Ausamaa’s points are very valid … many in Lebanon (20? 30%?) do not want anything positive … not yet. They want Syria humiliated for a while. Then they will get their revenge. Before revenge they do not want to settle things peacefully. They call that “justice” …they need punishment, not peace making.

Justice … Another “good” word, like “democracy” and “fight against tyranny” and “free press” (mostly owned by Saudi Arabia) … all the good stuff they use to convince themselves, and convince others that they are on the good side of things.

2) IF the mentality in Lebanon goes back to the calm, positive, constructive one that Ghassan Toueini was asking for, THEN I hope Bahsar would go to Beirut again and inaugurate Syria’s embassy there and state in very clear terms Syria’s recognition of Lebanon… if an apology is needed, it will have to be accompanied by Lebanese recognition of the thousands of Syrian soldiers who died while fighting to stop the Lebanese civil war. I don’t think the relatives of those soldiers will like to see their Syrian Leader apologetic for “Syrian amry’s mistakes” in Lebanon … the corrupt generals and soldiers were not whe real story … successfully stopping the Lebanese civil war was the real story. And maintaining security in Lebanon afterwards.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:48 pm

 

62. G said:

[....yawn....] 

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:52 pm

 

63. Alex said:

G,

I have been called “stupid” by a few Lebanese “geniuses” here. Never by anyone else.

Must be jealousy, or lack of reason… when people need to resort to silly insults, it shows how weak their argument is.

Geagea was in jail for 11 years only because Syria was inforcing “justice” in Lebanon … Was Jumblatt put in Jail? others?

And this silly “(and Syria is implicated in all of them, the reports say)”

Is from the original Mehlis report … no one in the UN takes it into account anymore, I will not accuse you of being stupid for not noticing that Brammertz asked for one more year … because he has nothing.

So basically you want us to put Bahsar in Jail because that will make your angry soul more at peace.

And Syrian soldiers were not running liek mad men shooting at anything that moved. They went there to bully all the militias until they all knew that they can not oppose Syria’s role … When they assign you (the smart one) to stop some civil war int he future you’ll realize what it takes.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:54 pm

 

64. EHSANI2 said:

Idaf,

I will respond to your link as soon as my time permits. The issue is too important for me. I would rather offer a proper response to it

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:59 pm

 

65. G said:

No Alex. But neither you nor Landis have read the Brammertz reports. If you do you know that the main point Brammertz has made is that ALL the crimes are connected, and that the Hariri crime’s motives were political directly linking it to Syria.

But then again, that assumes you actually know what it is you’re bullshitting about.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 6:59 pm

 

66. Alex said:

No, we did read the Brammertz report G,

Go ahead copy here those parts where he talked about the crimes being political and I will show you who knows how to read and who does not.

And the more you continue to insult me the more I know I am making sense. Keep it up.

The point I was saying about the Kennedy assassination is that … the Hariri murder looks like it will never be solved, like most big assassinations. If Catholics went with the “for sure WE KNOW who killed him” … well then …what happens next?

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 7:08 pm

 

67. Atassi said:

Alex,
Thank you for your reply
I think, We are on agreement on many of the points you made,
Please keep in mind, Syria as a state Will Never be humiliated, Syria is more important and much bigger than being associated with individuals, groups and clans. Again, Justice can be achieved on the personal level ONLY, NOT on the state level…
Assuama.. The same apply to your post

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 7:33 pm

 

68. Samir said:

Idaf:well, it was rebuilt as the everything had to be destroyed because it was not built according to engineering standards

This is not true and the stadium was 90% finished in 1995 and it was not completly rebuilt.

Idaf:This will no doubt score Bashar lots of points of trust and popularity in Aleppo

Thanks Idaf ,according to you,aussama and alex,Syrians are cheap people,they have no memory and no more dignity…
There is no single aleppine familly which has no one of its son killed,or missing…i think their fate is more important for the aleppines than a stadium.
It must be known that lately a number of rapists and killers of the syrian people were appointed at key posts by bashar…among them the criminals mohamad nasif and walid abaza.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 8:02 pm

 

69. K said:

IDAF,

No offense taken, but you misunderstand me. Alex comes closer to figuring me out.

“You stated that the reason for your animosity against Syria/Syrians/Syrian regime emerged from your family’s suffering of Syrian bombing during the civil war”

That’s not precise. I have animosity against plenty of players in Lebanon, the Mideast and the world, and I do criticize them all (in relevant fora). The topic here is Syria, so you only get to hear my views on Syria. In response to expressing these views, a lot of pro-Syrians have questioned my emphasis on Syria vs other criminals in Lebanon. This is where my personal history comes in.

“we were like siblings fighting and punching each other blind fully, until the mother [Syria] came and slapped each of us on the face until we stopped fighting and sat and talked together”!”

I resent and reject this analogy, it reeks of Ba’thism. But, to go along with it: Syria’s crimes are not limited to military violence in the war-era. The mother continued to abuse her children long after the cessation of outright hostilities.

I appreciate your acknowledgement of Syrian crimes, but I believe you underestimate their extent.

Among them are:

1. Several military invasions, with air/artillery bombardment, killing and destruction

2. 3 decades of occupation. Think Israeli occupation – checkpoints, searches, daily harassment and humiliation

3. Reign of terror: suspension of media freedoms, making a farce of Lebanese politics, arbitrary arrests and disappearances, mukhabarat omnipresence and control, torture, and fear

4. Economic crimes: theft of resources, smuggling, dumping goods, black market, extortion, and racketeering (in collusion with Lebanese figures)

5. Use of Lebanon as a pawn in the struggle against Israel or in support of Iranian regional ambitions

6. Use of Lebanese puppets to paralyse and terrorize Lebanon, in service of Syrian interests

The 2nd paragraph from last is pure shit:

“From your last post to Ausama, it’s clear that you are blinded with your hate to Syria (which is defining you on the political spectrum of the Lebanese blame culture as a “patriotic Christian”). You are proud of this status.”

Huh?

“You are even willing to overlook, forgive and justify destruction of your country by Israel because as you put it: you or your sect weren’t the targets. It does not matter that 3000 Lebanese lost their lives last summer and the tens of thousands of devastated lives and destroyed homes. ”

I am absolutely not willing to “forgive” Israel for the summer war or its other crimes – never. Syria-Iran share responsibility for the war, that’s the part you’re in denial about.

“You prefer to keep your mind focused on something that happened 20 years ago or more to your own sect or neighborhood. You have to get revenge for that, even if it takes you a life time. You were fed this culture of hate and revenge since childhood and you’re satisfied with it. It defines you as a patriot which you are proud of in your community.”

This is sheer crap. To adequately respond to this unsubstantiated shit, I feel pressured to delve into personal details: where I live, what sect I “belong” to, my views on religion and tribalism, etc. If you want to go down that path, fine, but you go first.

Alex,

I’m aware of Israel’s record. I’d also add to your list, Zionist agents planted explosives in Jewish targets in Iraq and Egypt in the 50s to terrorize Arab Jews into emigrating to Israel.

That said, I’m sure you know the Syrian regime is behind the recent killing spree (not just Hariri), as do most readers of this blog. You like to play “what if?” games and take the principled stance “innocent til proven guilty”, but you know it’s Bashar. Maybe you feel threatened by Lebanese certainty in blaming Syria; you see it a sign of hatred/prejudice. You want me to demonstrate that I’m reasonable, not just hateful, and reasonable people entertain various theories before settling on a conclusion. If I had time to play, I would, but I know you know who’s behind the killing spree.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 8:13 pm

 

70. Syrian said:

K,

You forget that in order for Syria to accomplish the 6 acts you listed they had to have had Lebanese facilitators. The problem the Lebanese face is that over the 3 decades, all of their leaders were Syrian facilitators at one point or another. You want to be angry, maybe you should direct your anger at your leaders who facilitated the abuse of Lebanese society. The Syrian authorities did what any occupying force does; use the occupation to promote their own interest.

We have a right to be angry with the Syrian government because we are Syrians and when we are abused, it is our own leaders who are doing it to us. It is the Syrian government that practices arbitrary arrests of Syrian citizens and for that we have the right to be angry. Again, I don’t think anyone here condones the suppression of freedom in Syria as legitimate.

You have the right to be angry with the Syrians because of the abuses they practiced in Lebanon, but your anger should be directed at those lebanese leaders who, for decades, continued to facilitate and promote Syria because it promoted their own selfish interest at the expense of the Lebanese at large.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 8:40 pm

 

71. ausamaa said:

K

You say: I am absolutely not willing to “forgive” Israel for the summer war or its other crimes – never.

Have you done anything about NEVER forgiving Israel apart from attacking Syrians? Honestly; have you??

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 9:55 pm

 

72. ausamaa said:

K,

Dont bother! No one expects an answer!

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 3rd, 2007, 9:57 pm

 

73. K said:

Syrian,

“… in order for Syria to accomplish the 6 acts you listed they had to have had Lebanese facilitators.”

Too true.

“The problem the Lebanese face is that over the 3 decades, all of their leaders were Syrian facilitators at one point or another.”

Partly true.

“You want to be angry, maybe you should direct your anger at your leaders who facilitated the abuse of Lebanese society.”

I am.

“The Syrian authorities did what any occupying force does; use the occupation to promote their own interest.”

Well said.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 12:00 am

 

74. K said:

Ausamaa,

I don’t have to prove myself to you.

The topic on this forum is Syria.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 12:01 am

 

75. Alex said:

K,

Ok, so we established that Israeli Intelligence probably orchestrated the Hindawi affair, which was an easily discoverable (a bomb on El-Al airlines) “terrorist” plan against a civilian target. And we established that everyone was sure Syria did it … the Syrian regime looked like stupid thugs .. exactly like the case when the popular Hariri was assassinated… Hindawi, Hariri … both times, “Syria is OBVIOUSLY” the one who ordered the murder.

At the time of Hindawi, I was absolutely sure Syria was not stupid enough to take such an unnecessary risk. But with Hariri, I agree that it is POSSIBLE that Syria (or some peoplein Syria) might have been involved in the decision to terminate him… but it is also highly possible that the others did it, not Syria.

You are still SURE that it was OBVIOULSY Syria behind all the political assassination in Lebanon the past tw years?… fine. Let’s look at another example:

Here is one of the typical popular accusations against Syria the past two years … I don’t doubt that you were, just like most of your M14 Lebanese allies, absolutely CONVINCED of the same things that Lynn Maalouf was convinced of in her Washington Post opinion piece where she wrote:

“In the lush Bekaa Valley, we drove past the quiet town of Majdal Anjar, and I thought of the mass grave uncovered there a few weeks ago. We Lebanese believe that many more such graves wait to be uncovered, as hundreds of families wait to learn the fate of their loved ones, some of whom were undoubtedly abducted or killed by the Syrian army. Right across the street was the Syrian occupation’s official headquarters, where every Lebanese politician once had to pay obeisance.

So far, Syria has offered no public apology for its years of occupation, not even an admission of any wrongdoing”

So Lynn and all of you were SURE those mass graves are another example of the criminal actions of the Syrians in Lebanon… the Washington Post allowed Lynn to express her hate of the evil Syrians… Syria’s reputation gets more and more tarnished .. and then:

Lebanon Mass Grave Said to Be a Cemetery
AP, 7 June 2006

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) – A burial site in eastern Lebanon originally believed to be a mass grave for victims of Syria’s military presence is actually a graveyard dating to the 17th century, a Lebanese prosecutor said in a statement published Wednesday.

So please try to be a bit less certain of everything that you would love to belive is a confirmation to your already held beliefs.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 3:09 am

 

76. EHSANI2 said:

Dear Idaf,

Earlier in this thread, you had asked me to comment on an article written by Hassen Al-Shami under the title of “Syrian Economy draws more Foreign Investment”.

Mr. Shami first attempts to convince his readers that Syria’s reform and structuring program has been faster than usual. He then tries to remind us that “Syria has not adopted ready-made reform programs suggested by the IMF and the World Bank, despite the fact that it has taken advantage of the IMF and the World Bank in the developing countries.”

The latter part of the above sentence is too poorly worded for me to make any sense of it. Who is taking advantage of whom?

Clearly, Mr. Dardari is the author’s main source for the story, so let us move to that part:

Mr. Dardari’s first claim is that the growth rate of the “country’s economy” is 5.25% in 2006 against 5.50% in 2005.

The next time someone tells you that the GDP of a country has increased by X%, please remember to ask: Is it in real terms or in nominal terms

Since prices fluctuate (generally they rise), one cannot know for certain whether more or less goods are being produced and sold just by looking at the revenue earned (or income generated). What economists usually do is deflate (correct for inflation) current or nominal income/spending. In effect, they isolate the effect of price fluctuation from measures of income and spending. This allows practitioners to distinguish between real growth in income as opposed to growth arising from price inflation.

In the case of Syria, prices are supposedly rising by close to 9% per annum. This means that to get a “real” growth rate of 5.25%, current or nominal growth must rise by 14.25%. To the best of my knowledge, Mr. Dardari has never specified whether the growth rates he announces are nominal or real (inflation adjusted). Were his 5.25% to be real, I think that it would be very useful for him to supply us with the deflator or price measure that he is using to adjust his numbers.

My next problem with the article concerns the discussion on net trade:

Mr.Dardari supposedly pointed out that the deregulation of trade in early 2005 was accompanied by the increase of non-oil exports from 213 to 327 billion Syrian Pounds. Such a rise has contributed to the decrease of the budget deficit from 78 to 24 billion Syrian Pounds in 2006, despite the decline of the oil imports value.

Surely, the writer must mean the trade deficit and not the budget deficit. Syria’s external trade reporting has always been fraught with difficulties. This is because the country had used multiple exchange rates in its reporting system. Recently, this arcane system has been simplified as the multiple exchange rates gave way to a more uniform rate. Having said this, I am still uncertain whether both exports and imports are subjected to an identical exchange rate.

My final observation on the article concerns the following paragraph:

“The Syrian GNDP is estimated at US $38 billion, and according to economic experts it could attain US $50 billion. Mr Dardari commented by saying, “If the Syrian economy wants to have a regional role after the change of the surrounding circumstances, the Syrian GNDP will have to be equal to that of Jordan and Lebanon together, and this means that our GNDP will attain US $47 billion by 2020, which requires a 7-percent annual growth rate.”

The author clearly gets the “GNDP” notation wrong. There is no such thing as “GNDP” It is either GDP or GNP. My hunch is that he meant to write GNP. Mr. Dardari cleverly avoids the clarification.

GDP v.s. GNP

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures what is produced inside the country in a year. Gross National Produce (GNP), on the other hand, measures what is produced by the citizens of a country, derived from the resources they own.

The GDP of Syria, for example, includes not only the value of goods and services produced by Syrians but also the contribution by foreign workers and foreign investors in the country.

The GNP of Syria, in contrast, measures the production by Syrians and Syrians only. These Syrians might be working overseas. These Syrians might own properties overseas and are making a decent living from the rent collected. They might also set up businesses abroad and earning considerable profits.

This is the first time that I have heard the figure of $ 38 Billion as being the size of Syria’s GNP. Various international organizations have pegged the size of the country’s GDP at close to $ 23 Billion. Given the numbers of Syrian citizens residing and earning income outside the country, it seems that Mr. Dardari has decided to start using GNP rather than GDP when it comes to measuring the size of the economy. For the record, in a country like the U.S. for example, the difference between the two measures is negligible.

The last problem with this error-filled article is an arithmetic one. If the size of the economy today is $38 billion and if this number grows at 7%, then by the year 2020, it will reach $91.6 billion and not $47 billion as the article suggested.

In conclusion, without publishing the data to support their claim, it is very difficult to verify the numbers cited by the country’s economic policy makers. My comment above dealt with some of those potential difficulties. It is my impression that the country’s fiscal predicament is not healthy. It is clear that Dardari thinks that some of the subsidies will have to go. I think that this is inevitable. Politically, however, it is a very difficult thing to implement. The recent jump in foreign direct investment (FDI) in the country has been impressive. The prices of most real estate in the country used to be undervalued when compared to other countries in the region. Clearly, given the recent price increases, this undervaluation has largely disappeared. Moreover, little of this FDI has gone into manufacturing and industrial investments. This has meant that the increased in foreign investments has not been accompanied by a commensurate rise in jobs and incomes. For that to happen, the country must adopt a very strong export strategy that can take advantage of the higher global economic growth, as the country’s present local demand is insufficient. This is what Turkey did under the leadership of the late Turgot Ozal. The recent free trade with Turkey is an excellent first step. Entering the WTO must also be a top priority. Fixing the country’s legal system is one of the prerequisites needed to make this happen of course.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 3:10 am

 

77. Samir said:

Ehsani this is a new report on the Turkish economy.
I think that Turkey is a good example for Syria, in Turkey they dont have a familly minority mukhabarati regime but an elected government.

http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/detaylar.do?load=detay&link=107248&bolum=106

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 3:28 am

 

78. K said:

Alex,

It’s funny you bring that up. For you, the mistake in blaming Syria outweighs the existence of actual Syrian-perpetrated mass graves in Lebanon! I don’t blame anyone for assuming that was a Syrian mass grave, given its proximity to Anjar and the actual presence of Syrian mass graves in Lebanon.

Like this one, found around the same time:
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/23/news/lebanon.php

“The bodies, identified by DNA tests, were handed over to the men’s families Saturday, concluding a wrenching 15- year search for their whereabouts…

..Of the 10 bodies buried Saturday, 7 were Lebanese Army soldiers led by General Michel Aoun, who fought the last battle of the civil war in 1990 against the Syrian forces that ended up controlling the country until last year. Another 10 bodies found in the mass grave have yet to be identified.”

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 4:04 am

 

79. Syrian said:

K,

You have indicated that the views you express here are limited to your views on Syria because this is a Syrian forum; however, the implication is that your views are presented out of context. Eventhough this is a Syrian forum, you cannot escape the fact that your views on Syria have to be presented in the context of your overall views. By presenting your views on Syria only we are left,at worst, with the impression that this is the only view that you have. That all else can be exonerated. At best, that Syria has had the predominant role in all Lebanese problems and issues.

At this point I would recall that Hafez Asad did not go into Lebanon because he coveted Lebanon for himself; all historical accounts point to him being coaxed into the Lebanese theater (Kissinger). Once in, he had no choice but to try and make the best of a bad situation and it was a bad situation for Syria.

On the mass grave point, I am sure Lebanon is littered with mass graves (a civil war byproduct) and I’m willing to bet they’re not all Syrian.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 4:21 am

 

80. Syrian said:

Ehsani, Idaf,

Here are some href=”http://www.indexmundi.com/syria/gdp_per_capita_%28ppp%29.html”>Syria
Growth Figures

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 4:30 am

 

81. Alex said:

K,

Again, please try to remember the purpose behind our discussion here. It is not that Syria did not kill anyone in Lebanon during the time its worked to stop the Civil war, how could it stop it without using force?.. through diplomacy? .. I don’t think Jumblatt, the Palestinians, and others were willing to stop their murders if Syria did not bully them. So yes, we know, Syria had to fight all the militias in Lebanon before it could stop the civil war … the last one they faught was Michel Aoun … after that the late Rafiq Hariri enjoyed the security needed to rebuild Lebanon… something you would not have had if Syria did not fight Aoun at the time.

Your article in the IHT says nothing in that respect… 7 Aoun soldiers were Killed .. that’s what it said … is this some shocking discovery worth discussing here? … In that case I will maybe find you a similarly irrelevant article that discusses hoe some Druze were killed at the hands of Chrisitan Militias.

Back to our “logical” (hopefully) analysis:

1) The Syrians are not the only ones who might be doing political assassinations in the Middle East. We proved through examples that “others” have a history of doing it, and of trying to implicate the Syrians in the process.

2) Many of the times the M14 Lebanese believed “Syria did it”, like the Anjar mass graves, they were wrong.

Of ourse I can give you many other examples of other stories which turned out to be totally wrong … like after the Hariri assassination whne everyone in the M14 group was sure the bomb was UNDER and not over ground … which obviously implies that Syria might have known about it or allowed it. Now we know that this very popular belief in the M14 camp was also false. The bomb was not underground.

Then there is the Magic pen that Chirac supposedly gave Hariri and Hariri had it on him when he met Bashar .. the M14 newspapers were announcing that Mehlis now had a proof in that recording Pen …

Where is that Pen now?

It does not exist… but it gave many of you enough amunition to continue imagining that FOR SURE Syria killed him. (not “maybe”)

Conclusion:

This M14 mentality of: “We have to fight and boycott Bashar the biggest thug in the Middle East” is not reasonable and not useful.

Basing policies on accusations which are based on perceptions of reality that are based on wishes of those who want revenge from Syria at any cost, is a path towards destruction .. of Lebanon most likely.

Looking at the past two years (since the Hariri killing) Given how many times you were wrong in your “I’m sure Syria did all the killings”, I hope you can just let the professionals in the UN team do their job and wait for the results.

And don’t worry … Syria is cooperating with them more than any other country.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 5:56 am

 

82. Rantings of a Sandmonkey » I love Seymour Hersh said:

[...] From his latest al jazeerah interview: [...]

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 4th, 2007, 11:29 am

 

83. SyriaComment » Archives » The Truth about Syria: Will the UN vote for a Tribunal? said:

[...] There is little international will to tie Syria up in a complicated international court process that most believe will ultimately be inconclusive. The UN investigation into the Hariri murder led by Brammertz has provided little beyond circumstantial evidence that Syria was involved. (On this see my earlier posts here and here.) [...]

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

April 12th, 2007, 4:40 pm

 

Pages: « 1 [2] Show All

Post a comment


5 × seven =