The Kurdish Flag Flies over Parts of Syria as Aleppo Ignites

Many Kurdish towns in the Northeast of Syria are now flying the Kurdish flag as Syrian troops have withdrawn from the region to fight back the offensives in Syria’s two largest cities. BBC reports that fighter jets strafed parts of Aleppo. This seems to be their first use and a clear escalation. Turkey has closed its border with Syria, halting the passage of all commercial vehicles between Turkey and Syria. Only refugees can cross into Syria. The borders are too dangerous.

Liberated Kurdish Cities in Syria Move into Next Phase
25/07/2012 06:05:00 By HEVIDAR AHMED

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region — Syrian governmental forces have retreated from the Kurdish regions of Syria without a fight; the liberated cities are now being ruled evenly by the People’s Council of Syrian Kurdistan (PYD) and the Kurdish National Council (KNC).

According to the information obtained by Rudaw, the Kurdish cities of Kobane, Derek, Amoude, Efrin and Sari Kani have fallen under the control of Syrian Kurdish forces.

The city of Kobane was the first Kurdish city to be liberated last Thursday, 17 months after the revolution against the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad began.

The KNC and PYD agreed to jointly control the liberated Kurdish cities in a deal made in Erbil on July 11, under the supervision of Kurdistan Region President Massoud Barzani.

“According to the treaty of Erbil which was signed by the KNC and PYD, any administrative vacuum in the Kurdish cities of Syria will be occupied evenly — 50/50 — by these two signatories. These two groups will continue ruling the Kurdish regions until an election is carried out,” said Nuri Brimo, a spokesperson of the Democratic Kurdish Party of Syria

The national flag of Kurdistan and the flag of the PKK – which the PYD is affiliated with — are now being raised over the majority of government and public buildings.

However Abdulbaqi Yusuf, a spokesperson of Kurdish Union Party (KUP), said, “The buildings under the control of PYD are using their own flags, but we as the KNC are using the national flag of Kurdistan. This is a problem because we only recognize one flag and that is the national Kurdish flag, but the PYD does not recognize that flag.”

He added, “For example, in the city of Kobane, we controlled some buildings and raised the Kurdish national flag over those buildings, but the PYD came and forced us out with their guns and removed the national flag of Kurdistan and replaced it with their own flag. We could not do anything because they were armed and we were not.”

Yusuf also had concerns about the quality of life for Syrian Kurds. “People are living in bad conditions and have not received any help,” he said, criticizing the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) for not coming to their aid.

“We have requested help from the KRG several times but they have not helped. Nobody listens to us,” Yusuf said.

Brimo admits that “Barzani asked the KNC and PYD to rule the Syrian Kurdish cities evenly between them and in return promised financial and moral support.”

Abdulbasit Sayda, the leader of the country’s largest opposition group, the Syrian National Council (SNC), said they were looking for help for people in the region. “As the SNC, we are holding meetings with international actors in order to receive financial and humanitarian aid and save ourselves from the clutches of the Syrian regime. We need this aid because the economic situation of the Syrian people and the Kurds is very bad and they need help,” he said….

Sayda added, “We are constantly in touch with Barzani regarding the situation in Syria and keep each other updated.”

Brimo explained the withdrawal of regime forces from the Kurdish cities. “The Syrian regime is gathering its forces in Damascus,” he said. “Therefore, they are retreating from other regions.”

He also revealed that the Syrian regime informed the PYD about their withdrawal in advance, so that the group knew beforehand which cities the forces would be leaving.

The Free Syrian Army (FSA) is present in many parts of Syria, but not in the Kurdish regions. “There is a sort of agreement between KNC and SNC. The FSA will not come to the Kurdish regions and the Kurds will not go the Arabic regions,” said Brimo.

Sayda admitted fearing a surprise attack by the Syrian government on these Kurdish regions.

“The Kurds of Syria need to brace themselves for a sudden return of Syrian government forces. It is probable that the regime might return to attack this region again,” he said.

A Friend in Iraqi Kurdistan writes:

Kurdish news here in Iraqi Kurdistan is reporting that Syrian Kurds have taken control of the Kurdish region of northeastern Syria. This has led to a crisis of relations between them and the FSA/rebels, however. Supposedly, some months back there had been a pledge of mutual support between the Kurds and the rebels, regarding resistance against the regime. Now however, the Kurds seem more interested in protecting their homeland than in participating in the nation-wide struggle against the regime. After taking control of Hasake (haven’t verified this), a conflict emerged between them and the FSA that wanted to control the area due to its strategic importance.

Here’s the one decent article (a great one, in fact) that I could find by Aymenn al-Tamimi

Syria’s Kurds stand alone after rejecting rebels and regime
Aymenn Al Tamimi
Jul 23, 2012

Developments in Syria and Iraq have led some to speculate that the birth of an independent Kurdish state might be at hand. A closer analysis shows that a united Kurdistan is still unlikely, although a separate semiautonomous Kurdish community in Syria, with some parallels to the Kurdish Autonomous Region in Iraq, is a growing possibility.

In Syria, Kurds are sitting on the sidelines of the uprising against the Damascus regime. Indeed, the Free Syrian Army has accused members of the militant Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) of hindering its operations in some areas against the Assad regime, according to the Kurdish website Rudaw.net. Leaders of the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), which is affiliated with the PKK, have made it clear that they will not tolerate the spread of Syria’s conflict into the Kurdish-dominated areas of Syria.

The PYD stands separate from the Kurdish National Council, a coalition of 11 Kurdish parties in Syria that has ties to the autonomous Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq. But leaders of the Kurdish National Council have also indicated to Rudaw that they are aiming to keep Kurdish areas free from fighting between the regime and the rebels.

The Kurdish groups are far from united on most issues – the KNC has in the past clashed with the PYD, but since Syria’s unrest began last year, the two factions have “signed an agreement sponsored by the Iraqi Kurdish leadership to prevent intra-Kurdish tensions”, according to Jonathan Spyer, an analyst at the Israel-based Global Research in International Affairs Center.

This, Mr Spyer writes in the Jerusalem Post, ensures “de facto Kurdish control of a large swathe of Syria’s north-east and the placing of this area off limits to the insurgency against the Assad regime for the foreseeable future”.

Syria’s Kurds are not, by and large, supporters of President Bashar Al Assad, but their scepticism about the Syrian opposition is understandable. For one thing, rebel fighters in Syria have the support of Ankara, which has a bad reputation regarding Turkish Kurds in matters of civil and cultural rights.

In addition, whenever Kurdish groups have tried to engage the Syrian opposition about the shape of a post-Assad Syria, talks have always broken down. The main issue is that the opposition refuses to drop the identification of Syria as an Arab nation (as evinced in the country’s official name: “Syrian Arab Republic”) and accept that Kurds are a distinct people. Thus ended the recent Cairo meeting of anti-Assad groups, attended by the KNC.

With Syrian Kurds declining to choose between Mr Al Assad and the opposition, the idea of a de facto Kurdish autonomous area in the Al Jazira area of north-east Syria becomes a possibility.

In the event of Mr Al Assad’s downfall, Sunni groups and others in Syria might be too distracted by infighting to deal with the question of Kurdish autonomy.

It does not follow, however, that the Syrian Kurds will join with Iraq’s Kurdish Regional Government to form an independent Kurdish state straddling the northern part of today’s Iraq-Syria border.

Turkey Shuts Syria Border
BY JOE PARKINSON AND AYLA ALBAYRAK – WSJ

TURKEY-SYRIA BORDER—Turkey sealed its border with Syria to all traffic except refugees on Wednesday, citing worsening security conditions following escalating skirmishes close to the frontier which last week saw rebel fighters capture at least two crossing points.

Turkey’s economy minister announced the move—which will halt the passage of all commercial vehicles between Turkey and Syria—in a news conference in Ankara, citing “serious concerns” for drivers’ safety and noting that there had already been a 87% drop in trucks traveling to Syria this year. Turkish officials and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees in Ankara …

Syria Conflict: Aleppo Fighting Shifts Regime Forces, Diplomats Defect
Reuters | Posted: 07/25/2012
By Khaled Yacoub Oweis and Erika Solomon

AMMAN/BEIRUT, July 25 (Reuters) – The Syrian army turned its forces on Aleppo on Wednesday, ordering an armoured column to advance on the country’s second biggest city and pounding rebel fighters there with artillery and attack helicopters, opposition activists said.

As hostilities intensified near the Turkish border, Turkey said it was closing its crossing posts, although the United Nations said refugees fleeing Syria would be allowed through.

Two top Syrian diplomats, in the United Arab Emirates and Cyprus, have deserted their posts, becoming the latest officials to abandon the Damascus government, rebels said.

The 16-month revolt against President Bashar al-Assad has been transformed from an insurgency in remote provinces into a battle for control of the two main cities, Aleppo and the capital, Damascus, where fighting exploded last week.

Assad’s forces have launched massive counter assaults in both cities. They appear to have beaten rebels back from neighbourhoods in the capital and are turning towards Aleppo, a commercial hub in the north.

Syrian forces fired artillery and rockets on Wednesday at the northern Damascus suburb of al-Tel in an attempt to seize it from rebels, causing panic and forcing hundreds of families to flee, residents and opposition activists said.

The 216th mechanized battalion headquartered near Tel started bombarding the town of about 100,000 people before dawn and initial reports indicated residential apartment blocks were being hit, they said.

“Military helicopters are flying now over the town. People were awakened by the sound of explosions and are running away,” Rafe Alam, one of the activists, said by phone from a hill overlooking Tel. “Electricity and telephones have been cut off.”

Opposition sources also reported helicopters and machineguns were firing on the neighbourhood of Hajar al-Aswad. The slum lies on the southern outskirts of the capital and has been a haven for rebels sneaking into Damascus from the suburbs.

Opposition activists said thousands of troops had withdrawn with their tanks and armoured vehicles from Idlib province near the Turkish border and were headed towards Aleppo.

Rebels attacked the rear of the troops withdrawing from the north, activist Abdelrahman Bakran said from the area.

Military experts believe an overstretched Syrian army is pulling back to concentrate on fighting insurgents in Aleppo and Damascus, important power centres for the government, while leaving outlying areas in the hands of rebels.

Der Spiegel: The Endgame in Syria Assad’s Bloody Battle to Cling to Power
2012-07-24

The Endgame in Syria Assad’s Bloody Battle to Cling to Power By Christoph Reuter Marcel Mettelsiefen / DER SPIEGEL President Bashar Assad is losing his grip on power in Syria and he has responded by …

US position on Syria directly endorses terrorism – Lavrov

Washington’s reaction to blasts in Damascus is a downright justification of terrorism, slams Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. US State Department announced that terror acts in Syria are not surprising in light of the Assad regime’s actions.

“This is direct endorsement of terrorism. How are we supposed to understand that?” Sergey Lavrov shared his astonishment at a press conference in Moscow. “This is a sinister position, I cannot find words to express our attitude towards that.”

“In other words this means ‘We are going to support such acts of terrorism until the UNSC does what we want’,” Lavrov commented on the US representative’s actions. Lavrov also expressed his surprise that the UN Security Council refused to condemn acts of terror in Syria. The US permanent representative to the UN Susan Rice has stated that terror acts in Damascus contribute to speeding up the adoption of a resolution on Syria according to the Chapter 7 of the UN Statute, which implies harsh sanctions, including resorting to force.

As for the EU unilateral sanctions against Damascus, they contradict the decisions taken by the UN Security Council and agreements reached at the Geneva talks, stated Lavrov.

Comments (303)


Pages: « 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 » Show All

201. Tara said:

Omen

I am not voting Democrat this time around. I do not want foreign boots in Syria. Never did and never will, but as you said, there are many ways this administration could have helped…

I wish I am directly in charge of Nobel peace prize…

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July 26th, 2012, 9:31 pm

 

202. zoo said:

Has the USA written off the FSA after the “Damascus Battle” defeat and its increasingly suspicious alliance with Al Qaeeda?

What political solution are they considering when the SNC is moribund?

U.S. foresees no military intervention in Syria
2012-07-27
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2012-07/27/c_131741546.htm
WASHINGTON, July 26 (Xinhua) — The United States said on Thursday that it foresees no military intervention in Syria despite worsening violence and conflict in the Middle East country.

State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland insisted on provision of non-lethal assistance only for the moment to the Syrian opposition, who are fighting to oust President Bashar al- Assad.

“If you are back on the issue of external military intervention, you know our view that we do not believe that pouring more fuel on this fire is going to save lives,” she told reporters at a regular news briefing, saying “We’re working in non-lethal ways to support the Syrian opposition.”

She stressed that the way out of the ongoing violence in Syria is not “more violence” and “more destruction.”

“The route out of this is an end to the violence and the beginning of a true political transition process,” she said, adding “The vast majority of Syrians continue not to want foreign military intervention, more weapons flowing into their country.”

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July 26th, 2012, 9:32 pm

 

203. irritated said:

#197 Tara

Aleppo will become the new Homs.

And then what?
I agree with you that the media war has failed. Yet, it is still trying to wash our brains with the post-Bashar plans when the kick-Bashar-out plans are far from succeeding.

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July 26th, 2012, 9:39 pm

 

204. omen said:

189. GHUFRAN said: it looks like the regime now has a deal with the Kurds not to enter this armed conflict and not to allow rebels access to Kurdish areas.

last night aje showed refugees and fighters continuing to transit back and forth through kurdish territory, on footpath smuggling routes into turkey.

michael weiss did an examination of the kurdish agreement:

I contacted Dr Abdulhakim Bashar, the former chairman of the KNC who now heads its foreign affairs committee (he’s also the Secretary-General of the Kurdish Democratic Party of Syria). I asked him to explain what the Hawler Agreement really means.

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July 26th, 2012, 10:04 pm

 

205. Tara said:

Irritated,

“Aleppo will become the new Homs. And then what?”

Haven’t the regime supporters always boasted about Damascus and Aleppo being the pillars of the regime? Pillars of Sand? It sure is not concrete..

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July 26th, 2012, 10:07 pm

 

206. Ghufran said:

مرح بقاعي
The lady from the SNC launched an unprecedented attack on Turkey accusing its government of complicating the opposition job by raising the Kurdish card. You can still watch Marah on BBC Arabic.
There is no sense in denying that the Kurds are not now interested in participating in this bloody fight,they may not have chosen sides yet but it is a matter of time before they will irreversible divorce the SNC and prevent the FSA from entering their areas. This situation put Sayda in a very uncomfortable position,I can sense from Marah’s tone that the SNC is furious, Erdogan again did what he does best: act like a total moron,however, one has to wonder whether a foreign power gave him assurance that a Turkish intervention under certain conditions will be accepted,this requires a clear response from Russia,Iran and Iraq,if that response comes,Erdogan will back off again.

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July 26th, 2012, 10:28 pm

 

207. omen said:

190. IRRITATED said: After Houla, any report of a “massacre” would have little effect. Unfortunately it’s deja vu

is this an admission that the regime committed houla?

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July 26th, 2012, 10:42 pm

 

208. Aldendeshe said:

@OMEN

The regime did not commit Houla after all. After well done investigation, you can be sure of that. But you will not get the true story if you asked, the locals simply too afraid of mercenaries retaliation than the regime.

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July 26th, 2012, 10:50 pm

 

209. Ghufran said:

The beautification of Manaf by the GCC media has started:
http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/07/26/228450.html
To be honest,I have no problem supporting any Syrian who has the ability to stop the blood shed and keep Syria in one piece,I am not sure that Manaf has the stature and the support to get the job done.
That being said,I have no way to verify the accuracy of the info in alarabiya article, most of what that channel says is processed and spiced up.

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July 26th, 2012, 11:37 pm

 

210. irritated said:

#209

The demonization of Bashar and the angelification of Manaf
What a sinister game…

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July 27th, 2012, 12:07 am

 

211. Uzair8 said:

On last night’s BBC Radio 4′s The World Tonight:

[Aleppo]

Luke Harding of the Guardian from Aleppo province made these comments:

- The regime cannot feed it’s troops. Troops left an area they were holding due to hunger.

- The revolution is an ‘unstoppable tide’.

Listen from: 7:50

A french journalist for Le Monde talks from Aleppo.

From 11 min Luke Harding of The Guardian talks about the view from Aleppo province.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01l1dlb

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July 27th, 2012, 12:13 am

 

212. bronco said:

If the SNC looses Turkey’s support they are finished. France is discreetly distancing from it since french citizen Ghaliun was replaced by Swedish citizen Sayda.

The SNC is in an irreversible coma, Al Qaeeda presence is growing and threatening Iraq, Israel and Jordan, the Kurds are discreetly building their independent state under the nose of naive Turkey, the chemical weapons are possibly moving into the hands of Hezbollah.
Now if the FSA is annihilated in Aleppo, I think it’ll be far too much for the West to bear.

As it can’t and won’t intervene, it will soon ask and help the Syrian Army to put an order to all that

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July 27th, 2012, 12:21 am

 

213. Uzair8 said:

Russia Today had an elderly western guest on who was praising the ‘clever’ Russian handling of the situation. At the end he was asked whether if this situation could be all over in a few days if Aleppo fell to the rebels, he said yes. Adding that within 30 days of Aleppo falling to the rebels it’ll be all over.

Edit:

Btw, in recent days Russia seems to be repeatedly slamming the support for rebels. Sounds like Russia is making it’s excuses for a failed and embarraSsing position on the crisis.

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July 27th, 2012, 12:28 am

 

214. irritated said:

#205 Tara

Damascus did not become Pompei. It stands alive and strong.
Let see if Aleppo will resist the ‘forced liberation’

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July 27th, 2012, 12:28 am

 

215. Bruno said:

@Uzair8
Uzair8 What you expect its BBC and Luke Harding of the Guardian, the Luke Harding of the Guardian since the uprising has been quoting rebel supporters on twitter and pro rebel reporters like Luke.

From the radio tape.

(The revolution is an ‘unstoppable tide’.)

So supporting proven Islamist terrorists is an unstoppable tide revolution yet at the same time Luke has been claiming, this statement.

(The regime cannot feed it’s troops. Troops left an area they were holding due to hunger.)

Honestly in a retro journalistic perspective, when you say something you have to back to back it up with the facts.

But i am not surprised that the Guardian had embedded its reporter on to Sryia illegally its almost like spying rather then reporting.
With Luke Harding of the Guardian from Aleppo and an other BBC reporter that only further proves my point about Journalism.

That the Journalism we knew has long dead out, the current Journalism is nothing more then what i call one sided Journalism.

People on this comment section have been accusing myself and others of been Assad paid agents, even though i am not at all nor i am here to amuse myself.

If you wanted to know whats a propagandist like then look no further then Luke Harding.

What happened at Damascus and the supposed attack on Damascus didn’t look anything like an attack it looked like an terrorist attack.

But of Course then you have reporters like Luke claiming the following.

(The revolution is an ‘unstoppable tide’.)

That’s actually ironic isn’t that the same statement the mainstream news outlets have said when the attack happened in Damascus?

Who Gave BBC, The Guardian the authority to send reporters into Sryia and to be with the Rebels?

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July 27th, 2012, 12:30 am

 

216. irritated said:

This is how the USA supports the people they have encouraged and promised to help. A country you can count on when you’re in trouble.

Victoria Nuland: All our thoughts are with the people of Aleppo, but we’ll do nothing to save them from an eventual “massacre”.

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July 27th, 2012, 12:34 am

 

217. zoo said:

The way forward in Damascus

26/07/2012

By Abdul Rahman Al-Rashed
http://www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=1
Clearly the Syrians are divided over this issue. One side wants to negotiate and accept the transitional phase. This has been expressed by Syrian National Council member George Sabra, who explicitly said two days ago: “We would agree to the departure of Assad and the transfer of his powers to a regime figure, who would lead a transitional period like what happened in Yemen”. The features of such a proposal appeared with the emergence of dissident Brigadier General Manaf Tlass in Jeddah. This sentiment has also been expressed by Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim, who said on the sidelines of the recent Arab ministerial meeting in Doha: “There is an Arab consensus that Syrian President Bashar al Assad should step aside quickly in return for safe exit”. For the first time, Arab countries will ask the Syrian opposition and the Free Syrian Army (FSA) to form a transitional government.

However, there is also a Syrian side that wants to fight until the end, because the time for negotiation, in their view, has expired, and as the opposition marches towards the palace it is only a matter of time until the regime falls.

A third group is as yet undecided, hamstrung by disagreements over which figures could be entrusted with the formation of the next government.

Although emotions are more inclined to the second side, which calls for the continuation of the fighting, rationality and experience warn against drifting behind this thought process. The fall of the regime has become almost certain with the significant combat successes achieved by the rebels in recent weeks, but the situation remains difficult because of the regime’s military capabilities, using aircraft, tanks and guns, and its ability to commit more massacres whilst being protected by Russia’s veto. In the end, al-Assad will travel to either Iran or Russia, but fighting until then does not ensure any form of agreement. Fighting until the end may cause the complete collapse of the military and security institutions, which consist of more than half a million elements who could be transformed into armed gangs. Is it in the national interest to destroy the state and drag liberated Syria into internal strife and wars fuelled by parties such as Russia, Iran and Hezbollah?! Is it not completely wrong to think that the end of Bashar will automatically bring about the end of his unjust state?
…..

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July 27th, 2012, 12:48 am

 

218. Uzair8 said:

Video.

Aleppo is far from won: Fisk

Posted July 26, 2012

Veteran Middle East correspondent Robert Fisk says Syria’s rebel groups are only in the outskirts of Aleppo, but if they can get into the historic citadel they can hold on while the regime crumbles

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-07-26/aleppo-is-far-from-won-fisk/4157948

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July 27th, 2012, 1:02 am

 

219. zoo said:

For Arab Facebook fans

Facebook acquires Israeli Face.com in 100-mln-USD deal
2012-06-19
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2012-06/19/c_131663996.htm

JERUSALEM, June 19 (Xinhua) — The Facebook social networking giant announced that it has acquired its second Israeli firm, Face. com, in what analysts estimated to be a 100-million-U.S.-dollar deal, Israel’s Globes news site reported Tuesday.

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July 27th, 2012, 1:05 am

 

220. Aldendeshe said:

“…dissident Brigadier General Manaf Tlass ..”

WOW..look at this… dissident already. Wonder who they are trying to sell this to, the Syrias? Suuuure they will buy it.

For those that really wants to get forward, don’t listen to this MASKHARA SAUDIYE HAKIRA.

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July 27th, 2012, 1:18 am

 

221. Syrialover said:

“You guys are missing the basic fact that a quick solution to this crisis is not desired by most big players,what is wanted by most is a civil war in a fractured country that is divided along sectarian lines” (#198)

Ghufran,

If you were asked to seriously explain or prove or rationalise that statement, you couldn’t.

Nobody could, not even the most paranoid conspiracy theorist.

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July 27th, 2012, 1:59 am

 
 

223. Juergen said:

Ossenberg the ZDF correspondent made an other report today and if you remember his kullu bi khair message yesterday, today its a total different reality.

His report:

The area is called Al Kadam in Damascus, near a big palestinian camp. The street had just been reopened minutes ago, and we are the first car to pass and suddenly we are in the fighting zone, inmidst of Damascus.

Every car is checked and we witness horrible scenes, people who are beaten but filming that was not allowed to us.From all directions we hear gunshots.

(interview older men) What have we done that they treat us like that? They destroy all and burn the houses!

The young fighters belong to Assad militias. Just last night they recaptured this quarter.The burned bodies of the rebels are still glooming. About 3000 rebel fighters are still hiding in this area.
( interview with the shabih) heavy shooting as Ahmed explains that the “terrorists” have made the inhabitants flee or killed them. People are fleeing, not far away from the citycenter of Damascus.

Ossenberg:

No one can claim normality here, in the back we hear gunshots, oviously the rebels are attacking helicopters which patrol the area.

In official statements the rebels were distributed out of Damascus, but we have seen it differently.

interview with Ossenberg after the report

Dietmar, after your experiences today, how do you evaluate the situation in Damascus?

Yes one could be wrong at times, yesterday i was really thinking that big parts of the capital are pacified or at least under the control of the army.This has been proven wrong today. We were in Kadam and if you take Midan an other hotspot in Damascus, we have to think that for about 1 mio people calm has not returned. The rebels have entrenched themselves in this area and fightings occur. It seems that it is not that easy for the Assad troops to penetrate those areas and to push out the rebels.The fighting continues, we have heard many heavy explosions today. Those were possibly bombardments of those suburbs. Thats one point we have seen. The other is that we have been visiting the hospital in which the army is treated. All of whom we spoke to said to us that inmidst the FSA fighters from all arabic countries are fighting. Those were send as “jihadis”, and also contigents of AQ which are fighting against the regular army.
That seems to be correct because we could identify fighers from Libya who were fighting back then and fight now in Syria.( Ossenberg was in Libya)
The whole scenario becomes more and more obscure and more and more difficult to evaluate.

http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek/beitrag/video/1693558/Weiterhin-Kaempfe-in-Damaskus?setTime=11.633

I was really angry last night when he fall into this trap of kullu bi khair, today we see how much wrong he was. It would be interesting to see video evidence of rebel fighters from Libya fighting now in Syria, i wonder what evidence he has for that claim.

By the way a second film team among Jörg Ambrüster has arrived yesterday.

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July 27th, 2012, 2:40 am

 

224. Bruno said:

I guess Sryialover and a few others on here wont be minding the Islamist take over of Sryia if that happensm which i doubt that it would seeing how FSA aren’t holding to long.

And as i reported a few pages Saudi Fighters have joined the FSA and i get 7 dislikes for that but if its from al jazeera a mouthpiece for the Qatar kingdom then you get likes? that’s quiet ironic.

I posted sources and yet people disagreed on it?

And i also i guess some of you don’t mind the alliance of Saudi Arabia, Qatar two dictatorship countries all these two demanding democracy in Sryia?

While both of them have funded and armed the Syrian rebels through by proxy, i guess thats not a problem thats pretty much acceptably.

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July 27th, 2012, 3:18 am

 

225. Antoine said:

ABLE REFERENCE ID : #06DAMASCUS1692

Subject :Two Important Sunni Leaders Assess Khaddam’s Impact

Origin Embassy Damascus (Syria)

Cable time Thu, 13 Apr 2006 11:44 UTC

Classification CONFIDENTIAL

Source http://wikileaks.org/cable/20

_______________________________________________________________

Classified By: Charge d’Affaires Stephen A. Seche, per 1.4 b,d. 1. (C) Summary: Two Sunni leaders, one from Damascus and the other from Deir a-Zour, near the border with Iraq, assess that former VP Abdul Halim Khaddam is a useful tool who has already weakened the regime. They are counseling their friends in the opposition not to attack Khaddam publicly, regardless of their private reservations. One of these Sunnis, Ihsan Sankar, claims that Khaddam has majority support among Sunnis in several cities in Syria. Both insisted that the regime has lost support and legitimacy in recent months, despite efforts to appeal to nationalism and Islam. They also expressed deep concern about increasing Iranian and Shiite influence in Iraq. End Summary.

¶2.
(C) ASSESSING KHADDAM’S SUNNI SUPPORT: According to former MP and influential behind-the-scenes Sunni opposition figure Ihsan Sankar, Abdul Halim Khaddam has the support of a majority of Sunnis in Homs, Latakia, and Tartous, and some support in Hama. In Damascus, it is a “wait and see” posture. However, the support in all these locales is “”very quiet.” Sankar also mentioned that former Minister of Industry Ghassan Tayyara supports Khaddam and that some 50 percent of Ba’athists also support him. (Other contacts, like Al-Hayat correspondent Ibrahim Hamidi, dispute this notion of significant Ba’athist support for Khaddam.) Sankar claimed that 90 percent of Ba’athists don’t like the President and criticize him for allowing his friends to monopolize the economy and for bringing problems to the country with his mistaken decisions. (Note: Sankar has made clear in the past that Khaddam also has significant support among a group of Alawite former regime insiders like Ali Duba and Ali Zeyout. Reftel.)

ADVISING OPPOSITION NOT TO ATTACK KHADDAM: . He had also told them that Khaddam is “not our enemy now; it is the regime that is imprisoning people, not Khaddam.” Sankar said he was fearful of possible splits in DD/opposition and of their efforts to form a steering committee or organizational structure to accompany their statement of principles. He called such a move inevitably divisive. Sankar said that he supports but did not sign the DD, claiming that it did not represent well the interests of the “conservatives” in Syria, meaning the Muslim population. In his view, the DD effort to reach out to Muslims through the Muslim Brotherhood was not completely successful and could not disguise the fact that the driving forces behind the DD were secular activists.

DEIR A-ZOUR FRIEND CONCURS: Sunni tribal leader and former MP from Deir a-Zour Ahmad Sheikh Jalat, who was visiting his friend Sankar, also called Khaddam a useful tool. When asked what role Khaddam could play in the opposition, Jalat said he could create strife and discord among the regime forces arrayed against the opposition. Jalat concurred with Sankar that the Damascus Declaration group should avoid attacking Khaddam.

C) STRENGTH OF REGIME ASSESSED: Sankar claimed that the regime is weakening “this time,” unlike in the 2000-2001 period when others had mistakenly predicted that the regime was weakening and might fall. The Brammertz investigation is definitely contributing to the uncertainty the regime is experiencing, as are economic problems, and falling support among officers and advisors inside the regime. The draining away of the regime’s legitimacy is also having an impact, especially because it is a minority regime. He assessed that the regime has only 15-20 percent support among the people. Sankar said it is not clear if people “are ready to go into the streets to protest against the regime.” (Comment: Most contacts tell us they are not ready.) It they do, he asserted, any SARG military and security forces reaction could be unpredictable. Although for example, the Republican Guard is 90 percent Alawite, the rest of the military is 70 percent Sunni and non-Alawite minorities. Consequently the regime might find it difficult to use the armed forces to repress any street demonstrations. Because of the lack of internal support, an invasion, as was done in Iraq, is not necessary to topple the regime, but “a gesture of support” at the right time might be needed, he added, without specifying exactly what he had in mind.

(C) REGIME USE OF ISLAM DISMISSED: Jalat rejected the notion that Syrians had been persuaded by President Asad’s recent appeals to nationalism and to Islam, calling such appeals “hand-me-down clothes” that had fooled no one. Like Sankar, he said the regime had lost its legitimacy and noted that as a minority regime it would have increasing difficulty ruling the country under those circumstances.

(C) COUNSELING ISLAMIC LEADERS: Sankar said that he had begun counseling certain Islamic leaders to be careful about their support for the regime, telling them it could be problematic for their future credibility. He had also conveyed the importance of teaching a message of tolerance, justice, and respect for non-Muslims (“the other”) in an initial effort to stop an intolerant strain of mosque preaching that was spreading.

C) CONCERN OVER SHIITE, IRANIAN INFLUENCE IN IRAQ: Both men expressed concern about the signs of rising Iranian influence in Iraq. Sankar called the influence dangerous and said it is everywhere in Iraq. According to Jalat, the Iranians are spending hundreds of millions of dollars in Iraq to spread their influence, and that the Saudis and the Kuwaitis are now pouring in money to the Sunnis to try to balance that influence. He called the rising Shiite influence in the country frightening for the region. Jalat reported that the Iranian cultural attache from Damascus had visited him recently in Deir a-Zour and invited him to Tehran for a visit, hinting it was an invitation he did not plan to accept. Jalat insisted that he is not sectarian but noted that the situation in Iraq and the region lends itself to calls for “sectarian balancing.”

C) Sankar told Polchief that he met recently with Iraqi tribal leader Meshar Jabouri, of Mosul, underlining to him that the American forces occupying Iraq were there temporarily but that Iranian influence would be permanent. He told Jabouri, as he tells other Iraqi Sunni leaders that he meets with, that the Sunnis in Iraq are making a fundamental miscalculation in supporting the insurgency against U.S. forces.

_______________________________________________________________-

Read this guys, its very interesting.

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July 27th, 2012, 4:13 am

 

226. Antoine said:

Dear Moderator,

I have posted a comment several times which has not appeared. I suggest you make it appear, not at the time when it was posted, but at current time.

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July 27th, 2012, 4:42 am

 

227. ann said:

Russia slams Syria opposition support – 2012-07-27

Sergey Lavrov said, “We are proposing things that would allow an immediate end to the violence. But the other party says. “No. Either the regime capitulates, or we continue to support the armed struggle of the opposition through various – including material – means. They justify the terrorists’ attacks. While such support continues, what sort of humanitarian actions can we discuss?”

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/video/2012-07/27/c_131742572.htm

BEIJING, July 27 (Xinhuanet) –Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has accused some countries of fuelling the violence in Syria by supporting the opposition and attempting to oust the country’s leader. He said that while the fighting continues, there could be no talk of humanitarian corridors and security zones in the beleaguered country.

Lavrov made his latest comments in Moscow after meeting his Serbian counterpart Vuk Jeremic.

His comment was in response to an Arab League plan to seek a new UN resolution on Syria – which would likely include a demand to allow access for humanitarian workers to the entire country.

Lavrov said the Geneva declaration has constituted a solid base to support the efforts of UN-Arab League servi special envoy Kofi Annan and the UN observers. The declaration was agreed by world powers on a roadmap to pave the way for a Syrian-led transition.

Lavrov also had harsh words for others’ support for the Syrian opposition.

Earlier this month, Moscow also opposed the introduction of a no-fly zone. It called that step counter-productive and one-sided. Lavrov expressed hope that the observer mission’s mandate could be extended again after mid-August.

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July 27th, 2012, 4:49 am

 

228. Antoine said:

ABLE REFERENCE ID : #06DAMASCUS1692

Subject :Two Important Sunni Leaders Assess Khaddam’s Impact

Origin Embassy Damascus (Syria)

Cable time Thu, 13 Apr 2006 11:44 UTC

Classification CONFIDENTIAL

Source wikileaks

_______________________________________________________________

Classified By: Charge d’Affaires Stephen A. Seche, per 1.4 b,d. 1. (C) Summary: Two Sunni leaders, one from Damascus and the other from Deir a-Zour, near the border with Iraq, assess that former VP Abdul Halim Khaddam is a useful tool who has already weakened the regime. They are counseling their friends in the opposition not to attack Khaddam publicly, regardless of their private reservations. One of these Sunnis, Ihsan Sankar, claims that Khaddam has majority support among Sunnis in several cities in Syria. Both insisted that the regime has lost support and legitimacy in recent months, despite efforts to appeal to nationalism and Islam. They also expressed deep concern about increasing Iranian and Shiite influence in Iraq. End Summary.

¶2.
(C) ASSESSING KHADDAM’S SUNNI SUPPORT: According to former MP and influential behind-the-scenes Sunni opposition figure Ihsan Sankar, Abdul Halim Khaddam has the support of a majority of Sunnis in Homs, Latakia, and Tartous, and some support in Hama. In Damascus, it is a “wait and see” posture. However, the support in all these locales is “”very quiet.” Sankar also mentioned that former Minister of Industry Ghassan Tayyara supports Khaddam and that some 50 percent of Ba’athists also support him. (Other contacts, like Al-Hayat correspondent Ibrahim Hamidi, dispute this notion of significant Ba’athist support for Khaddam.) Sankar claimed that 90 percent of Ba’athists don’t like the President and criticize him for allowing his friends to monopolize the economy and for bringing problems to the country with his mistaken decisions. (Note: Sankar has made clear in the past that Khaddam also has significant support among a group of Alawite former regime insiders like Ali Duba and Ali Zeyout. Reftel.)

ADVISING OPPOSITION NOT TO ATTACK KHADDAM: . He had also told them that Khaddam is “not our enemy now; it is the regime that is imprisoning people, not Khaddam.” Sankar said he was fearful of possible splits in DD/opposition and of their efforts to form a steering committee or organizational structure to accompany their statement of principles. He called such a move inevitably divisive. Sankar said that he supports but did not sign the DD, claiming that it did not represent well the interests of the “conservatives” in Syria, meaning the Muslim population. In his view, the DD effort to reach out to Muslims through the Muslim Brotherhood was not completely successful and could not disguise the fact that the driving forces behind the DD were secular activists.

DEIR A-ZOUR FRIEND CONCURS: Sunni tribal leader and former MP from Deir a-Zour Ahmad Sheikh Jalat, who was visiting his friend Sankar, also called Khaddam a useful tool. When asked what role Khaddam could play in the opposition, Jalat said he could create strife and discord among the regime forces arrayed against the opposition. Jalat concurred with Sankar that the Damascus Declaration group should avoid attacking Khaddam.

C) STRENGTH OF REGIME ASSESSED: Sankar claimed that the regime is weakening “this time,” unlike in the 2000-2001 period when others had mistakenly predicted that the regime was weakening and might fall. The Brammertz investigation is definitely contributing to the uncertainty the regime is experiencing, as are economic problems, and falling support among officers and advisors inside the regime. The draining away of the regime’s legitimacy is also having an impact, especially because it is a minority regime. He assessed that the regime has only 15-20 percent support among the people. Sankar said it is not clear if people “are ready to go into the streets to protest against the regime.” (Comment: Most contacts tell us they are not ready.) It they do, he asserted, any SARG military and security forces reaction could be unpredictable. Although for example, the Republican Guard is 90 percent Alawite, the rest of the military is 70 percent Sunni and non-Alawite minorities. Consequently the regime might find it difficult to use the armed forces to repress any street demonstrations. Because of the lack of internal support, an invasion, as was done in Iraq, is not necessary to topple the regime, but “a gesture of support” at the right time might be needed, he added, without specifying exactly what he had in mind.

(C) REGIME USE OF ISLAM DISMISSED: Jalat rejected the notion that Syrians had been persuaded by President Asad’s recent appeals to nationalism and to Islam, calling such appeals “hand-me-down clothes” that had fooled no one. Like Sankar, he said the regime had lost its legitimacy and noted that as a minority regime it would have increasing difficulty ruling the country under those circumstances.

(C) COUNSELING ISLAMIC LEADERS: Sankar said that he had begun counseling certain Islamic leaders to be careful about their support for the regime, telling them it could be problematic for their future credibility. He had also conveyed the importance of teaching a message of tolerance, justice, and respect for non-Muslims (“the other”) in an initial effort to stop an intolerant strain of mosque preaching that was spreading.

C) CONCERN OVER SHIITE, IRANIAN INFLUENCE IN IRAQ: Both men expressed concern about the signs of rising Iranian influence in Iraq. Sankar called the influence dangerous and said it is everywhere in Iraq. According to Jalat, the Iranians are spending hundreds of millions of dollars in Iraq to spread their influence, and that the Saudis and the Kuwaitis are now pouring in money to the Sunnis to try to balance that influence. He called the rising Shiite influence in the country frightening for the region. Jalat reported that the Iranian cultural attache from Damascus had visited him recently in Deir a-Zour and invited him to Tehran for a visit, hinting it was an invitation he did not plan to accept. Jalat insisted that he is not sectarian but noted that the situation in Iraq and the region lends itself to calls for “sectarian balancing.”

C) Sankar told Polchief that he met recently with Iraqi tribal leader Meshar Jabouri, of Mosul, underlining to him that the American forces occupying Iraq were there temporarily but that Iranian influence would be permanent. He told Jabouri, as he tells other Iraqi Sunni leaders that he meets with, that the Sunnis in Iraq are making a fundamental miscalculation in supporting the insurgency against U.S. forces.

_______________________________________________________________-

Read this guys, its very interesting.

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July 27th, 2012, 4:49 am

 

229. ann said:

Russia to keep military base at Syria’s Tartus: Navy commander – 2012-07-26

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2012-07/26/c_131741093.htm

MOSCOW, June 26 (Xinhua) — Russia would retain its military support base at the Syrian port of Tartus, Navy Commander Viktor Chirkov said Thursday.

“The material-and-technical support base is designed to assist the Navy’s operations in the Mediterranean Sea and the Gulf of Aden. We will keep it,” Chirkov told reporters here.

He stressed the base in Tartus has helped lower costs of long-distance operations of the Russian Navy.

Currently, there are 10 Russian warships, including large landing ships, and 10 more auxiliary vessels in the Mediterranean Sea, Chirkov said, stressing that these ships would not call at Tartus.

“Russian ships are not planning to call at the Syrian port of Tartus. They will continue to perform combat missions in line with their cruise plans, which were made in 2011,” Chirkov said.

[...]

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July 27th, 2012, 5:12 am

 

230. ann said:

Russia negotiates naval bases in Cuba, Vietnam, Seychelles – Jul 27, 2012

http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_07_27/Russia-negotiates-naval-bases-in-Cuba-Vietnam-and-on-Seychelles/

Russia is holding talks on obtaining naval bases in Cuba, Vietnam and Seychelles.

This came in an interview with the RIA-Novosti news agency by the Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy, Viktor Chirkov.

The Russian Navy saw that it badly needed foreign bases after 2008, when Russian naval ships began to patrol the Gulf of Aden as part of the anti-pirate mission in the area.

[...]

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July 27th, 2012, 5:16 am

 

231. ann said:

Crackdowns in Gulf States expose double standards – 27 July, 2012

http://www.rt.com/news/gulf-states-double-standards-184/

While vigorously supporting rebellion in Syria, Gulf nations have little patience for political dissent at home, which reveals double standards and Western interests in the region, believes political analyst Omar Nashabe.

In an ongoing crackdown on opposition groups, the United Arab Emirates arrested eight activists, bringing the total to almost 40 rounded up by authorities. They are charged with plotting crimes against the state and opposing the constitution.

The arrests follow even harsher crackdowns in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, where police dispersed recent demonstrations by force. Two people were killed by the Saudi police at a rare mass rally in the east of the country on Sunday, sparking further unrest.

In Bahrain, which has seen 17 months of protests, demonstrators clashed with police on Friday as the government moved to limit political marches.

People in all Arab countries have legitimate demands for democratic reforms and accountability, states Nashabe. However when violence enters the picture, things get out of hand, as happened in Syria. “It very difficult and problematic to rebuild everything after it has been destroyed,” he says.

The political analyst says that it is pure hypocrisy for the Gulf countries to support rebellion in Syria while there is dire need for reform at home. “That’s a clear double standard. One doesn’t wish that this would happen in Saudi Arabia or in the Emirates because violence will only lead to more violence.”

[...]

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July 27th, 2012, 5:19 am

 

232. ann said:

Turkey’s pursuit of Kurdish rebels: Pretext for NATO intervention in Syria? – 27 July, 2012

http://www.rt.com/news/turkey-syria-kurdish-rebels-176/

The Turkish prime minister first spoke of a possible intervention against Kurdish militants in northern Syria on Wednesday evening. “If there are formations that are being set up right now that lead to a terrorist act, then naturally we have the right to intervene,” he said in an interview with Kanal 24.

Dr Franklin Lamb, director of Americans Concerned for Middle East Peace, told RT that it increasingly seems that Ankara is going to make good on its pledge to cross the border into Syria in pursuit of the Kurdish rebels.

Lamb stressed that Erdogan had earlier hinted that he may invoke Article 5 of the NATO charter, which considers an attack on one member of the bloc to be an attack on all. “If Syria pursues across the border [with Turkey] one can imagine that the Turks will say to their NATO partners ‘look, this is attack on all of us, we’ve got to go in.’ And that might give some excuse.”

[...]

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July 27th, 2012, 5:26 am

 

233. Mina said:

Double standards or no standard at all?

Pepe Escobar… qawwi jiddan, as usual!

Welcome to the Kurdish Spring
By Pepe Escobar

Turkish foreign policy, codified by Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, used to be known in shorthand as “zero problems with our neighbors”. When Turkey started calling for regime change in Syria, it turned into “a major problem with one of our neighbors” (even tough Davutoglu himself admitted on the record the policy change failed).

Now, in yet another twist, it’s becoming “all sorts of problems with two of our neighbors”. Enter – inevitably – Ankara’s ultimate taboo; the Kurdish question.

Ankara used to routinely chase and bomb Kurdish PKK guerrillas crossing from Anatolia to Iraqi Kurdistan. Now it may be positioning itself to do the same in Syrian Kurdistan.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan came out all guns blazing on Turkish TV; “We will not allow a terrorist group to establish camps in northern Syria and threaten Turkey.”

He was referring to the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Party (PYD) – affiliated with the PKK; after a quiet deal with the Assad regime in Damascus, the PYD is now in control of key areas in northeast Syria.

So Ankara may provide logistics to tens of thousands of Syria’s NATO “rebels” – which include plenty of hardcore Sunni Arab “insurgents” formerly known as terrorists; but as long as Syrian Kurds – which are part of the Syrian opposition – demonstrate some independence, they immediately revert to being considered “terrorists”. (…)
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/NG28Ak02.html

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July 27th, 2012, 5:27 am

 

234. ann said:

Iran vows ‘unchangeable’ support for Syria with ‘experience and capabilities’ – 27 July, 2012

http://www.rt.com/news/iran-vows-support-syria-170/

Iran has pledged more support for Syria amid mounting “foreign pressure” and promised not to leave its ally “alone in difficult times.”

“Given that powers have united to damage the Syrian nation, Iran’s stance toward Syria is not changeable – it will always stand by its Syrian brothers,” Iran’s first vice president, Mohammad Reza Rahimi, said on Thursday while meeting Syria’s deputy prime minister, Omar Ibrahim Ghalawanji, in Tehran.

The secretary of Iran’s National Security Council, Saeed Jalili, called relations between Iran and Syria “strategic”, saying that Tehran is ready to support Damascus “more than before in the face of foreign pressure.”

In response, Ghalawanji expressed his gratitude to Iran, stressing that the West’s “cruel sanctions” against Syria have hit the Syrian people more than they have affected the government.

Earlier on Wednesday night while meeting Ghalawanji, Iran’s vice president in charge of international affairs, Ali Saeedlou, said that “Tehran is ready to give its experience and capabilities to its friend and brother nation of Syria.”

The statements come while a Syrian delegation of 15 ministers and high-ranking officials are in Tehran on a three-day visit to seek the expansion of economic cooperation.

Tehran expressed its readiness to reconstruct facilities damaged in Syria during the uprising. The Syrian delegation also secured Iran’s support in developing electricity and water facilities.

Syria and Iran have agreed a deal on importing 50MW (megawatts) of Iranian electricity into Syria via Iraq. The figure will climb to 200MW at the next step.

“We agreed with Iran that in one month agreements will be made with Iraq, so that putting problems to one side, electricity imports from Iran will begin,” Syria’s electricity minister, Imad Khamis, said on Thursday.

[...]

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July 27th, 2012, 5:30 am

 

235. Mina said:

What academic spinning leads to…
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/NG28Ad01.html
” Syrian wheel of fortune spins China’s way
By Peter Lee
(…)

Juan Cole of the University of Michigan laid out the big picture strategic thinking behind some of the border seizures on his blog, Informed Comment:

If the FSA can take the third crossing from Iraq, at Walid, they can control truck traffic into Syria from Iraq, starving the regime. The border is long and porous, but big trucks need metalled roads, which are few and go through the checkpoints. Some 70% of goods coming into Syria were coming from Iraq, because Europe cut off trade with the Baath regime of Bashar al-Assad. The rebels are increasingly in a position to block that trade or direct it to their strongholds. [1]

According to an Iraqi deputy minister of the interior, the units that seized the border were perhaps not the goodwill ambassadors that the Syrian opposition or Dr Cole might have hoped for:

The top official said Iraqi border guards had witnessed the Free Syrian Army take control of a border outpost, detain a Syrian army lieutenant colonel, and then cut off his arms and legs.

“Then they executed 22 Syrian soldiers in front of the eyes of Iraqi soldiers.” [2]
‘…)”

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July 27th, 2012, 5:34 am

 

236. Amir in Tel Aviv said:

July 27th, 2012, 5:48 am

 

237. Amir in Tel Aviv said:

A Rastani isn’t happy with Bashar al Assad new reforms and new constitution
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85QWyKbWImE
.

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July 27th, 2012, 5:53 am

 

238. Bruno said:

@Amir in Tel Aviv
Amir in Tel Aviv the more you keep posting videos like this the more it just rises the question are you getting paid for this?

Amir in Tel Aviv i do remember you posting on the CNN comments on about Sryia since it started so seeing you post here its not surprising.

I am surprised that you stopped posting there though

As for the YouTube videos you just posted, its rebel propaganda just like a lot of other people have said the way the rebels have been using YouTube as there tool of propaganda can be only cited as brilliant.

Most if not all of the videos aren’t new but are republished on YouTube.

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July 27th, 2012, 6:01 am

 

239. Juergen said:

Bruno

I understand its a tempting thought that bataillons of western secret services work on blogs like this one. Same claim you raised concerning Amir one could raise about you or any other person here. Does this bring us any further?

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July 27th, 2012, 6:24 am

 

240. Bruno said:

@Juergen
Don’t worry i am not neither Pro rebel nor Pro Assad i am just showing and reporting the reports from different sources.

But honestly the way people here or some for that matter have been defending Qatar and Saudi Arabia is unbelievable, these are the same two tyrannical regimes that a repression and savaging torture against there own countries with the people demanding the minimum of rights.

And women rights.

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July 27th, 2012, 6:32 am

 

241. Syrialover said:

See the distraction faction here, busier than ever with say-nothing cut-and-pastes and rambles.

Note their insensitive lack of interest or concern about what’s actually happening in Syria. Assad’s violence and terrorizing of 2.5 million people and plans to demolish a beautiful city.

Watch them using Syria and this forum just to parade their own personal agendas and obsessions.

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July 27th, 2012, 6:32 am

 

242. Mina said:

SL,
You come out with the same comment all the time. Why not saying the same when someone posts from CNN or Turkish media?
Why not blaming Joshua Landis when he does his news round-up?
Intimidation and division are the only achievements of Syrian opponents, quite sadly. When are they going to come out with a real framework for the “Yemeni solution”? As Peter Lee mentions in the article of the Atimes linked above, the last attempt by a SNC member was rejected the next day by another SNC member.

All the western media are telling us that “there will be a massacre in Aleppo” and that many journalists are there,so I am waiting from you the links to the news of the “mother of all battle” (Saddam not dead!) that the rebels are announcing.

In the meantime, some people take their distance:
http://thesantosrepublic.com/2012/07/head-of-un-team-confirms-u-s-propaganda-war-on-syria-annan-purposely-shut-out-from-u-s-news-media/
“July 24, 2012 (TSR) – For the second time this month, a senior U.N. official has taken the United States and its allies to task for not doing their part in stopping the war in Syria, blasting an incomplete portrayal of the war in Syria that fails to recognize that the anti-Assad opposition also is responsible for violence and the failure of a U.N. cease-fire plan.

Paulo Pinheiro, a Brazilian diplomat who is the head of the U.N. commission charged with investigating human rights violations in Syria, told the Spanish newspaper El Pais in an interview published Sunday that while there is a civil war unfolding in Syria, there is also a propaganda war that complicates efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the conflict.(…)”

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July 27th, 2012, 6:45 am

 

243. mjabali said:

Observer:

Sorry that I couldn’t respond to your interesting post #13 July/25 faster because of work.

When I tell you that the state would be called Syria No Kandahar, I mean two things. The first is its Syrian identity. The second denotes to a place where it is not like Kandahar where many has no rights. Syria no Kandahar means: Syria that gives its citizens modern human rights.

I agree with the Syrian Hamster that every sectarian name is bad, but, the name “Alawi State” was brought by the French. The coast is mixed with Sunnis, Christians, Alawis, Murshidis, Ismailis, and many atheists.

Do not label me as a racist and the one who hate the Sunnis. I am not. Simple and clear. But, when I tell you that the majority of Syrians hate each other and think in a sectarian way, I am speaking from what I see in front of me. Do not be surprised because the events are proving a huge schism in the middle.

The whole area is sectarian; Lebanon, Iraq, Saudia Arabia…etc

As for Bashar al-Assad as the embodiment of Ali as the God on earth, I was really amused by what you wrote. I want to ask Alawis about that. I have never heard of it ever.

Bashar al-Assad prays (or tries to) as a Sunni, speak like one and do not know for sure what is the old Alawi prayers (religion). Bashar al-Assad is no Ali ibn Abi Talib, and funny you said that, now some people start believing that.

About the Alawis and Arab Nationalism: the Alawis surprisingly to you and many are more “Arabic” than most of the Sunnis of Syria. Sunnis in Syria are a mixture between some Arabs and the leftover ethnic mix the Ottomans left. Do you want me to list to you the manes of the Alawi tribes?

Hafez al-Assad and al-Baath party adopted the pan-Arabic agenda because, in my humble opinion, they needed something. al-Baat was no match to the leftists (communists were very strong in Iraq) and the Syrian Nationalists. Both the communist in Iraq and Syria were killed and sent to prison by al-Baath. The Alawis traditionally are more in the Syrian National Party and the Left. The Alawis became Baathis because of Hafez al-Assad.

The Alawis should look for their Syrian identity first. The Arabs in general proved that they really hate the Alawis. You can read it everywhere on the net. You see what is the true feeling of the Arabs, so the Alawis are abandoning the Arabs. I spoke with many of them and they are now more into their sectarian identity, all of them still believe in Syria.

The Sunnis of the revolution so far did not do anything to help kill the fears of the Alawis. The results of the military operations is going to decide who is going to be where and ruling what.

The whole area in the Middle East is thinking in sectarian terms.

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July 27th, 2012, 7:31 am

 

244. Syrialover said:

Mina, you push a bewildering mix of political agendas and theories and find things on Syria to support them.

I have relatives in Aleppo.

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July 27th, 2012, 7:43 am

 

245. Tara said:

General Mood declaring “it is only s matter of time before Assad falls !!!  What a cowered!  Why did he give the impression that he was sympathizing with Assad during his tenure?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/middle-east-live/2012/jul/27/syria-us-fears-aleppo-massacre-live#block-14

11.51am: It is just a matter of time before President Assad’s government falls, General Robert Mood, outgoing head of the UN monitoring mission in Syria, told Reuters today:

In my opinion it is only a matter of time before a regime that is using such heavy military power and disproportional violence against the civilian population is going to fall.

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July 27th, 2012, 8:04 am

 

246. Tara said:

One defection after another defection.  Now a MP from Aleppo

11.02am: More on the defection of Aleppo MP Ikhlas al-Badawi. A clip of her interview on Sky News Arabia is available here. Rima Cherri translates her saying:

I have crossed to Turkey and defected from this tyrannical regime, because of the repression and savage torture against a nation demanding its basic rights.

What made me take this decision was the revolution and the legitimacy of the people and their right for freedom and dignity. People’s demands to live as free citizens have prompted the use of every method of repression in order to silence these demands. Everyday, I see more massacres, it’s happening on the land of Syria, with the use of strange machines and tools.

I have lived through this reality in my own town of al-Atareb [west of Aleppo]. I thought it is my duty to leave the regime

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/middle-east-live/2012/jul/27/syria-us-fears-aleppo-massacre-live#block-9

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July 27th, 2012, 8:05 am

 

247. Observer said:

If the majority of Syrians hate the Alawis it is because of people like Hafez and his cronies who deep down inside were extremely sectarian. Likewise the present discourse we hear from Maliki and Nasrallah is turning to be deeply rooted in sectarian thinking and feeling when the former says I am Shia first Iraqi second and Arab thirdly and Nasrallah keeps harping on the ill treatment of Bahrainis while reaffirming his support for the regime in Syria.

This is the story of all the minorities in the ME they want a secular national based identity on the majority Sunnis while they retain their particular minority special status.

So Majbali how are you going to create a Syria No Kandahar state where the communities in it as you state already hate each other to the core? If the communities in Syria hate each so much how is that going to be different in a mini Syria on the coast.

Call a spade a spade and ask for a pure sect based state for the Alawis and one for the Druze and one for the Kurds and one for the Sunnis and so on and so forth.

This is why in the current lack of a national identity in the post Sykes Picot ME world I have called for an economic union under a federation of the region as whole where the local areas can be politically autonomous and the economy can thrive independent of it.

By the way in your Alawi state will you take all of the current so called leaders of Syria starting with Fredo and his clique? WIll you take the Republican guards and the 17 security services or will you leave them behind to continue to oppress us?

Please please take all of the Alawis and all of their leaders and all of their structures and all of their statues and put them in your Alawi state and get the heck out of our hair.

By the way, in contrast to you I have read the Alawi so called Quran at the National Archives in Paris when the French took several copies of it during the 20′s. Ali is divine and Muhammad usurped it from him and their leader is an embodiment of this divine leadership not actually God on earth. So I stand corrected.

By the way the Alawi have killed those in their midst that have divulged the secrets of the sect.

I do not begrudge them their faith they are free to worship and believe in any way they want, I only object to their extreme hatred of Sunnis in particular and of their identity being based on this hatred of the Sunnis. To listen to them you would think that Sunnis are intrinsically evil just as the Nazis portrayed the Jews.

If Sunnis persecuted them in the past I accept their grievances and I fully understand that people develop ideological frame of rules and ideas to protect their faith and identity but it cannot be based on the dehumanization of the other which is exactly what the current regime is pursuing fully and exactly as the father and his cronies have done before.

I listened more than once to their security leaders say that it is either us or them and the best thing to do to a Sunni is to kill him or corrupt him. That was in the 80′s when the MB was revolting against the rule or Hafez.

I woud like to pursue however the idea of a museum like the apartheid museum in South Africa with branches in all of Syria where examples of the torture and humiliation and security oppression and the graft and corruption practiced by the Alawi regime in the last forty years be exposed. In your Alawi state you can also have a museum for Sunni oppression as well and perhaps in a few generations people will look at this period as the dark ages of the ME.

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July 27th, 2012, 8:09 am

 

248. Syrialover said:

Rebels cleaning the streets in Aleppo

See how they are doing cleaning not “cleansing” like the regime thugs

“As Aleppo Fight Looms, a Bit of Rebel Public Relations”

http://projects.nytimes.com/watching-syrias-war?ref=world

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July 27th, 2012, 8:45 am

 

249. Syrialover said:

Observer,

Like the Genocide Museum the Cambodians set up to show the world what Pol Pot did.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuol_Sleng_Genocide_Museum

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July 27th, 2012, 9:02 am

 

250. ghufran said:

I agree that cleaning the streets of Aleppo is better than carrying guns and killing other Syrians.

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July 27th, 2012, 9:20 am

 

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