“The squeeze on Assad,” by the Economist

The squeeze on Assad
The regime of Bashar Assad is tottering. His fall would probably trigger a short-term surge in violence, but a better government would emerge
The Economist, Jun 30th 2011 | DAMASCUS | from the print edition

Patience, weapon as well as virtue
IT WAS the biggest meeting of its kind for decades: under the watchful eye of President Bashar Assad’s security goons, 150 dissidents, veteran opposition figures and former political prisoners met in Damascus on June 27th to denounce the regime’s brutality and demand a peaceful transition to democracy. The street protesters dismissed the conference as a compromise with the regime. They want no truck with it. “We hate the government,” says one young man who was detained and tortured. “That’s all that counts now.” Other demonstrators parody Muammar Qaddafi’s threat to hunt down opponents “alley by alley”. “Alley by alley, house by house,” they chant, “We want your head, O Bashar.” But the Damascus meeting, and uprisings in towns such as Hama and Deir ez-Zor, shows that Syria’s opposition has gone from being a few scattered groups holding spontaneous, isolated protests in March to become a nationwide force.

More than 100,000 people now demonstrate every Friday and the regime cannot rein them in, though it has closed roads to restive towns, reinforced the borders and restricted access to the internet. Demonstrations have been held in at least 150 towns and villages in all corners of the triangle-shaped country. Malls and souks are deserted. Cafés are half-full, the smell of cardamom coffee and cherry tobacco spicing the habitués’ anxious questions.

Will Syria end like Egypt and Tunisia? It seems unlikely, at least in the short run. In those countries the army sided with the protesters, whereas in Syria it has not. Might Syria follow Libya’s example? So far, there are no signs of a regional split. What about Iran, which brutally and successfully crushed a revolt in 2009 and which is a close Syrian ally? Even that is different. Iran is run by an elected government (though the poll was rigged), not a single family. It has endless oil reserves; its sectarian divide is minor and its security forces more sophisticated. Syria’s have so far killed 1,500 people, ten times as many as in Iran. Most significantly, the Assad regime—half a dozen family members call the shots—has acted erratically. Bashar, the president, swings between brutal crackdowns and vacuous concessions. That does not bode well for a dictator under pressure.

In contrast, Syria’s opposition is becoming more coherent, as well as more widespread. It is centred on a youth movement based outside the capital. Its detractors are right when they say that few articulate leaders have emerged, no formal structures exist and many of the demonstrations have taken place outside big cities.

But this is no peasant revolt. It has the support of large parts of the Sunni Muslim clergy. University graduates and longstanding dissidents, on the fringes at first, now march alongside day labourers. Political parties are being revived, including a Liberal Party which was stillborn six years ago. The city of Hama—site of a massacre of protesters ordered by Mr Assad’s father in 1982—slipped briefly out of official control in May. In recent days the security forces seem to have withdrawn from the city altogether.

The protesters are resilient partly because they are organising themselves into many small groups. Activists are setting up cells of about 20 people, connected to each other by only one leader. Some networks rely on the anonymity of the internet. But with only about a fifth of Syrians online, traditional bonds are more important. Tribal, professional and collegiate relationships of trust are harder to shut down than phone lines.

But if their organisation is loose, the protesters show a remarkable unity of purpose. They want what everyone in the Arab spring wants: elections, freedom of speech and assembly, protected status for minorities, an end to the regime’s repression. Some organisers have asked eminent economists for advice on market reforms. They show political sophistication by talking of a “civil” democracy, not a “secular” one. To many Muslims, secular means godless and wayward.

If the demonstrators were to topple the government, they could draw on capable technocrats to form an interim administration. Among them is Abdullah Dardari, a former deputy prime minister and senior United Nations official, who is liked from Washington to Riyadh. He was Mr Assad’s chief economic reformer until he was fired soon after the protests started—a target for the regime’s hardliners and a scapegoat for its failings.

In the past the Assads have relied on public indifference as well as outright repression. Syrians used to look at neighbouring Lebanon and Iraq and conclude that stability mattered more than freedom. But the killing of so many countrymen this year is changing that view. “We have become citizens, when once we were sheep,” says a middle-class Damascene. Fear of the security forces, which once kept millions at home, is ebbing. No authoritarian state can survive a sustained decline in its authority—and the government’s writ is shrinking visibly. The police no longer issue speeding tickets or parking fines. Unlicensed traders in the souks—once chased away—now occupy prime spots. Illegal construction is rampant. “Everyone is adding a new floor to their house,” says a home owner. “Officials no longer object.”

Above all, the killings and detentions are failing to cow the protesters. Torture victims have become protest organisers. At an underground meeting in June, one of many victims of the regime described being doused in cold water before being electrocuted by cables attached to his genitals. His aim—to inspire, not scare, the protesters—seemed to be achieved.

The momentum of change may accelerate soon. Ramadan begins in early August and many Syrians will then start to visit their mosques, rallying points for the demonstrations, daily, rather than weekly. The protest leaders think this may prove a turning point: “Friday every day,” they say.

Many Western observers are sympathetic to the protesters but sceptical of their strength and coherence. What matters more is the regime itself. Its power is fast eroding. It could collapse under the weight of its own failings.

Brick wall ahead

The immediate threat comes from the economy. Business activity is down by about half, according to entrepreneurs and analysts. A company selling car-engine oil has seen sales drop by 80%. “And this is not a luxury product,” says one of the owners. Most firms have sacked employees or cut pay or both. According to rough estimates, unemployment has doubled this year from about 10%. Officials worry that grain supplies are low and food shortages could come soon. Trade is down between 30% and 70%, depending on where you are, and that was before a new round of sanctions imposed by the European Union, Syria’s biggest trading partner. Foreign investment, on which Syrian growth has been built in recent years, has dried up. In a recent speech, Mr Assad talked about the threat of “economic collapse”.

Public finances are in deep trouble. The president has raised government salaries and various subsidies to appease the populace. He cannot afford to do this. The government will probably print the money to meet its promises, so runaway inflation is likely, further fuelling popular anger as cash deposits become worthless.

Capital flight is rampant. Drivers on the roads into Lebanon talk of clients going from their bank in Damascus straight to one in Beirut, carrying large bags. According to one estimate, $20 billion has left the country since March, putting pressure on the Syrian pound. To slow capital flight, the government has raised interest rates. A phone company controlled by the Assad family sent out messages urging people to put money back into their accounts.

But a run on the banks cannot be ruled out. Over the past few years, about 60% of lending in Syria has been for people to buy their own cars. Many can no longer keep up with payments. A leading financier says, “If one of the smaller banks defaults, we all go down.” Some branches are even displaying millions of dollars—in bundles of notes piled head high—to reassure worried customers. Some keep enough cash in the vaults to repay almost half their depositors on the spot.

“We are heading for a brick wall,” says a man responsible for several percentage points of GDP. With the regime bust, the elite is likely to be asked to bail it out. Rami Makhlouf, Syria’s richest man and the president’s cousin, said as much during a recent press conference. Having pledged to give up part of his wealth, he added: “I call upon Syrian business leaders to follow this example because our nation is in need of support. The time has come for giving rather than taking.”

But Syria’s captains of industry are asking whether they must “go down with the ship”, as one puts it. Some are taking their children out of private schools in Damascus to send them abroad. One prominent businessman who long flaunted his closeness to the president has given a Western ambassador a list of his supposed disagreements with the regime. “For my file,” he says. Another has been donating blood to support the protesters. In Homs, the country’s third city, businesses have started paying protesters’ expenses.

The central compact of the Assad regime is breaking down. The president’s family is from a minority Muslim sect, the Alawites, who are rank outsiders in Syria, accounting for around 10% of the population. His father seized power in 1970 and struck a bargain with the richest merchants, who are mostly from the Sunni majority, who make up 75%. In return for political support, the regime pledged to protect their wealth. The merchants got rich but few warmed to the Assads or their Alawite cronies, who have behaved like mafiosi, demanding a slice of every pie. Now a growing number of merchants believes the regime has become bad for business. They think that rather than ensuring stability, it is the main cause of instability, deliberately stoking sectarian tensions to scare people off the street.

Other parts of the Assad coalition are wobbling, too. Christians, numbering around 10%, have long backed the regime, calculating that they are better off with the Alawites than they would be under majority Sunni rule. But that too may be changing. Christian leaders who were fervently backing the regime a month ago are now more cautious. They still fear being targeted if civil strife erupted. But it is no longer clear the Alawites would protect them. Some Christians have joined protests.

Syria’s sizeable Kurdish minority (about 10% of the population) is also trying to work out who would best serve their interests. The regime has offered to return the citizenship which it took away from some of them in 1963. Iraqi Kurdish leaders, including President Jalal Talabani, whose people across the border have won autonomy, have been giving advice. Some Syrian Kurds are demonstrating against the regime—though they (and the protest leaders) are wary of making the opposition seem like an ethnic uprising.

Even the Assads’ own Alawite minority is not guaranteed to support the regime. If there were a civil war they would no doubt stick together. But Alawite families provide some of the most prominent dissidents, including a poet called Adonis, Aref Dalila, an economist, and Louay Hussein, a writer and activist. Although the Assads have looked after their own relatives, most Alawites remain desperately poor. Some villages in their home region near the Turkish border do not have running water. Their leaders are said to have quietly contacted Sunni imams to seek security guarantees in return for abandoning the Assads.

Reform, repression or regional war?

Indeed, the only people the regime can really count on seem to be the security forces. The top brass—mostly staffed by Alawite loyalists—has given no hint of switching sides. And now that they have spilled so much blood, their options are limited. Even so, months of cracking down are taking a toll. In some hotspots troops are short of rations and depend on local people for food. Expanding operations further will be difficult. A number of units are being kept out of the fight because they are not trusted, especially ones filled with Sunnis. Manaf Tlass, a senior commander in the elite Republican Guard and son of a former defence minister, is staying home for unknown reasons.

According to some analysts, only a quarter of the total armed forces of roughly 400,000 is well equipped and ready to fight—and of these, only half, or 50,000 men, is really reliable. Twice that number is demonstrating each week. So far, the regime has been lucky in that the uprisings have been sequential, moving from one place to the next. If the protesters rose up at once, the regime could lose control. That is beginning to happen.

So what next? One possibility is that the regime might change course and try to reform. It has made a number of promises to protesters, such as new laws on political parties, elections in August and a reduction of the privileged status of the ruling Baath party. It has called a “national dialogue summit” for mid-July to talk about these. But such promises sound insincere. It is not clear who might attend the summit (the opposition says the crackdown must stop first). The president has been talking about political reform for a decade. Given the bloodshed, his promises would almost certainly be too little, too late—even if they were fulfilled, which they may not be. The regime seems incapable of opening up. Amnesties are followed by waves of arrests. The president’s cult of personality has grown since the protests started. Reform would anger the security services, his only loyal allies. “They are playing for time and trying to take the wind out of the demonstrations,” says one observer in Damascus. But “the system cannot be reformed,” says a former top official, bluntly.

So might the regime go the other way, attempting harsher crackdowns and targeting churches and mosques—perhaps through proxies—to divide and rule the sects? A growing number of citizens are arming themselves. Future tussles with the security forces are likely to result in many more deaths. But a violent meltdown is not inevitable. The Alawites seem unlikely to start a civil war. They are a small minority and would probably withdraw to their mountain redoubt if under existential threat. They might seek to provoke communal or religious clashes. But Syria has seen no big communal clash since 1862, when Muslims burned down Christian houses in Damascus. You might think that Syria could see an Islamist takeover. But, when the Muslim Brotherhood was a legitimate political party in the 1950s, it got only 3-6% of parliamentary seats. Even government insiders—with an interest in playing up the threat—estimate that the brothers would get at most 15% today.

Perhaps the regime could try to start a regional war to distract from problems at home? It could attack Israel directly or via its ally Hizbullah in Lebanon. It could ask for more Iranian support than it already gets, even at the risk of drawing in Saudi Arabia on the side of the opposition. The region’s main faultlines would then be starkly exposed: Arabs v Persians, Jews against the rest. But the Middle East is always full of such talk. It rarely amounts to much (though when it does the consequences are terrible). Iran, Israel, Hizbullah and Saudi Arabia all stand to lose a great deal from an all-out conflict in Syria. The Assad regime has long seen its backing for the Palestinian cause as a source of prestige at home and in the region. But among other Arabs (including many Palestinians), the Syrian regime is coming to be seen as toxic, not just for its brutality but for what many think has been its cynical manipulation of the Palestinian issue.

Patience, weapon as well as virtue
Lastly, might the Syrian regime split or change from within? Sunni officers staged three coups in quick succession after independence in 1946. The chances of that happening again are small. Among the Assads, Bashar’s is the most acceptable public face. There seems little mileage in ditching him. The Assads have been anticipating coups for 40 years and have cleverly compartmentalised the security forces.

So perhaps the best outcome would be some form of negotiated transition under international auspices. Turkey, a one-time ally of the Assads, is working on a deal that would save the family face and give the Sunnis more power. Ahmet Davutoglu, its foreign minister, is due to visit Syria soon. Russia, which has a naval base near Tartus, is also taking a keen interest. A bargain could be struck if (when?) the regime loses control over parts of the country. Protesters might take over one or more cities like Hama. Some villages and valleys are already barricading themselves in.

A Syrian denouement may not yet be imminent but the regime is tottering. The extraordinary endurance of demonstrators week after week is paying off. Patience has been the key to many challenges to the ancient thrones of Damascus. On a visit 150 years ago Mark Twain wrote wryly of the three-millennia-old city: “She has looked upon the dry bones of a thousand empires, and will see the tombs of a thousand more before she dies.”

Comments (249)


Pages: « 1 2 3 4 [5] Show All

201. ANonYMOUS said:

Rambo,

Did you just say your ‘neutral’? Seriously? and you base this ‘neutrality’ based on your past posts?………

So your ‘proof’ is Adduniya TV? Really? i mean really? And did they really say that one of the effects of this substance is “Lack of proper appreciation for things”…and “Jumping, Laughing and Hysteria”? And the proof of the spraying in Homs is a video of a Yemeni spraying water on fellow Yemeni protesters (whom we are assured were not hot, since i assume Adduniya took weather measurements on that cool day in Sana, Rami Mahlouf sapres no expense fir such useful things)?

So were the thousands of Homsi’s all sprayed by a guy with a squirt-gun? Or from a half-litre plastic bottle?

Please, if you told me that the ‘substance’ was sprayed by US stealth bombers flying over Homs dropping mini Rambo paratroopers carrying mini squirt guns i’d believe that over your garbage Adduniya ‘proof’.

Peace

ANONYMOUS

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 8:04 am

 

202. Syrian Commando said:

I’m neutral on Bashaar, not the fake “revolution”.

Its from SNN, not addounia, addounia relayed it and investigated further, I can’t find the original source.

>So were the thousands of Homsi’s all sprayed by a guy with a squirt-gun? Or from a half-litre plastic bottle?

Hey guess what, there’s more than one sprayer! And I’ve seen them at multiple protests! Your sarcasm is nauseating.

Go spray some on your skin and jump off a building please:

http://www.amazon.com/Mercola-Vitamin-B12-Energy-Booster/dp/B001GFKOJA

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 8:08 am

 

203. OFF THE WALL said:

Commando
You almost fooled me for a second when you were talking about narratives to a point I was tempted to compose a response. Yet, true to expectation, you sooner than later posted the link to Syrian Comedy Central (AKA Addunya TV) so-called report about bio-agents and mass madness. How do you expect me to take you seriously, for I am at loss of words to respond now. I expect you to declare my defeat and your victory, Go ahead, be my guest, if it matters so much to you.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 8:37 am

 

204. Syrian Commando said:

>How do you expect me to take you seriously, for I am at loss of words to respond now. I expect you to declare my defeat and your victory, Go ahead, be my guest, if it matters so much to you.

Wow, how predictable and very nice strawman. You won’t even indulge me with your thoughts. That’s mainly because you have no ideas, I’m right aren’t I? You just want the ouster of the current government and a substitution thinking things will “just get better”.

Move on people, these clowns are wasting your time.

They rely on al khanzeera all day and call addounia “the comedy channel”.

I’m so frustrated and sad that these pathetic excuses for human beings are here trying to pretend they are reasonable people when they can’t accept opposing opinions and conflicting facts.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 9:03 am

 

205. Revlon said:

A poem by AbdelRa7man Yusof
The people and the tyrant

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:19 am

 

206. Revlon said:

Misyaf freedom activists join Hama demonstrators
Friday of “Get Out

أحرار مصياف في مظاهرات حماة || لافتة باسم مصياف || 1-7-2011

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:20 am

 

207. Revlon said:

Martyr Abdel3azeez Zeineddin
He was arrested by security forces four days ago, in front of his residence.
His body was returned yesterday, amply “reformed” by junior thugs.

One family member screams: What did he do to deserve this?
AlFati7a upon his soul,

May God bless his family with solace and empower them with patience.

استشهاد عبد العزيز زين الدين في المعتقل 02/07/2011

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:20 am

 

208. Revlon said:

Save your white Pennies, until the dark regime falls

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:22 am

 

209. Revlon said:

Syrians are preferring to demonstrate over leisure on Fridays

http://www.aawsat.com/details.asp?section=4&article=629339&issueno=11905

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:23 am

 

210. Revlon said:

Light break: Shabbee7a

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:24 am

 

211. Abughassan said:

There was a flood of posts from one poster who still insists on “sharing” videos and images of dead people to remind us that people are dying in Syria. The manager at Samiramis hotel was supposedly hostile to the meeting that took place today and “failed”.
The message is the same: we need moderation from both sides and we need security forces to be restrained and be held accountable. There is strong suspicions that Bashar is unable to act as the head of state when he is faced with intense pressure from “the hawks” to let security chiefs do their job and focus on political issues.the problem with this approach is that the security solution was and still is a major factor in rising anti regime feelings and the increased level of violence that we witnessed few weeks ago. Without dialogue and leadership from civilian leaders I do not see a real way out any time soon.
The removal of Hama’s governor was due to his “failure” to prevent a massive demonstration two days ago and suspicions that he is sympathetic to the opposition,some may still think he was removed because people did not like him.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 10:54 am

 

212. Syrian Commando said:

Abughassan,

I just ignore the comments, treating it as the actions of a spastic-autistic anti-social commentator.

People in Hama absolutely hate that governor, the fact that people are saying otherwise really amuses me. There are so many opportunists in the foreign anti-Syrian group, they hope no one will see the inconsistencies in their position.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:01 am

 

213. louai said:

ANONYMOUS

its true history repeat itself no doubt about that ,but to understand what history will repeat itself you need to know what you reality we live in , for the revolutionists Syria s like Egypt or Tunis or Syria is still the same they left in the 80s ,any Syrian will write books about the corruption and many negative things in Syria if you ask him , BUT that dose not call for revolution against the government or the president and surely dose not call for revolution , you accuse everyone in here of being supporter and fo Bashar because he is either benefits or in denial because you are in denial yourself , people are not neccecerlly supporting the government but for sure same people are against the revolution because the revuloton did not sell itself to the decent citizens.

i know Bashar has support not only because of the massive rallies we saw in support of his reform but because of the massive resistance this revolution is facing from the decent Syrian people

‘To say that the “ONLY” man to have influence is Al 3r 3oor shows you know very little or next to nothing about whats going on.’
can you enlighten me ? give me one other name that if he tells those people to stop do Tkbeer and Takseer they will respond ! the sad fact is 3ar3orisim is the trademark of this revolution otherwise we would have seen better quality and quantity of people demonstrating
you wrote to SyrianNoKandahar
‘And please dont shed your crocodile tears for Nidal or anyone else. We all know who killed him and the tens of thousands of others over the past 40 years. Shame on you for showing fake sympathy.’
that’s my friend discredet you because off course we all know who killed Nidal we saw them on youtube ,we saw them on photos and we saw them on TV admitting , you clearly don’t know who is Nidal or you think other readers of the blog don’t

Peace

Louai

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:12 am

 

214. jad said:

Another small step in the right direction, meeting of another part of the oppositions in Semiramis, they argued, they yelled, they disagreed they agreed, they even fight and they had something to say, and we all have to listen, all of this is healthy and smart baby steps forward, I support my Syrian brothers and sisters in everything they do in a way to move forward and they are doing the right thing.
I agree with SC when he state that the expats are out of touch with what`s happening inside the homeland and that people there are actually smarter and way better than us, they `TALK`, they `DEBATE`, they try very hard to come up with solutions, they are real and we are delusional.
They are the ones we all need to support in whatever we could, I have hope for Syria and I trust Syrians living in the homeland of being able to have solutions for this extremely dangerous conflict:

أجواء اجتماع المبادرة الوطنية من اجل سوريا

http://youtu.be/4_kkTuW6vzI

http://youtu.be/TX_yZj7LzIs

The fight:

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:16 am

 

215. OFF THE WALL said:

بـرنار هنري ليفي وكلاب الحراسة السوريين
by Ali Atassi on Sunday, July 3, 2011 at 4:29pm

برنار هنري ليفي واحد من أبشع رموز الثقافة الاستعراضية التي نشأت وترعرت في الثلاثين سنة الأخيرة في فرنسا عند نقطة الالتقاء بين سلطة المال وسلطة التلفزيون وسلطة رجال السياسة. إنه الفيلسوف بلا فلسفة والمفكر بلا فكر والمناضل التلفزيوني المدافع عن القضايا السهلة التي لا تكلفه شيئا وتدر عليه الشهرة والجاه والمال. إنه النقيض الحقيقي لكل ما قدمته فرنسا من نماذج لمثقفين مستقلين ونقديين، منذ إميل زولا ومرورا ببول نظام وجان بول سارتر وميشال فوكو وجاك دريدا وبيار بورديو ووصولا إلى بيار فيدال ناكيه الذي كان أول من كشف كذب وإدعاء وجهل برنار هنري ليفي في تاريخ الفلسفة التي يدعي انتمائه إلى ممارسيها.

برنار هنري ليفي هو أيضا واحد من منظري اليمين المحافظ الجديد ومن حاملي لواء معاداة الإسلام و منظري الخطاب العنصري بحق الجالية المسلمة في أوروبا، باسم العلمانوية الفجة وسياسة الدمج القسري للمهاجرين
برنار هنري ليفي إضافة إلى كل ذلك هو واحد من أشرس المدافعين عن اسرائيل وجيشها وإحتلالها وجرائمها. وهو لا يترك فرصة تفوته من دون ان يهاجم ويحارب ويبتز أي مثقف فرنسي نقدي يحاول أن ينتقد بعمق الدولة العبرية وسياساتها وسياسة غض النظر الغربية تجاهها.

من هنا لم يكن غريبا أن يركض برنار هنري ليفي لاهثا وراء رياح التغيير العربية عساه يتمكن من جعل طاحونة هوائه تدور مع التيار ليجني منها بعض العوائد الرمزية والإعلامية والمالية التي تسمح له بتغذية تجارته الإستعراضية الرابحة والتي سبق له أن مارسها في كل من البوسنة والشيشان وأفغانستان. هذه التجارة التي تتلخص بعبارة واحدة هي: المتاجرة بدماء الضحايا لبناء المجد الزائف لبرنار هنري ليفي

الغريب والمؤسف والمدان، أن برنار هنري ليفي وجد في صفوف بعض تجار المعارضة السورية الطارئين على العمل السياسي من هو على شاكلته. الأمر الذي مكنه بمعونتهم من فتح دكان تجارة جديد في العاصمة الفرنسيه يستطيع من خلاله أن يروج لدماء الضحايا السوريين لتلميع صورته كمثقف إستعراضي، في ذات الوقت الذي يتمكن فيه هؤلاء السوريون من فك عقدة النقص التي يحملونها تجاه الرجل الأبيض من خلال سماحه لهم من دخول صالوناته المخمليه ومعاشرة طبقته السياسية النخبوية وتبادل الأنخاب على موائدهم العامرة ، وكل هذا باسم نضالات وعذابات الشعب السوري البطل.

لقد سبق لبول نظام أن أطلق تسمية كلاب الحراسة على أشباه المثقفين الذين يخنون الناس ويجيرون القضايا العادلة لبناء مجدهم الشخصي، ولا شك أن برنار هنري ليفي هو الوريث الأجدر بهذه التسمية في فرنسا اليوم. لكن أن يتم إدخال كلب الحراسة المسمى ليفي للينهش ويتاجر بالثورة السورية في فرنسا في الوقت الذي يقدم فيه الشعب السوري مئات الضحايا دفاعا عن حقه في الحرية الكرامة، فهنا الطامة الكبرى. إن كلاب الحراسة السوريين الذين تخول لهم أنفسهم مثل هكذا ممارسات باسم المعارضة، هم الوجه الآخر لكلاب السلطة الذين يدافعون عنها في الإعلام صباح مساء. والشعب السوري سيعرف كيف يحاسب كلا الطرفين عندما تأتي ساعة الحقيقة.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:36 am

 

216. jad said:

نقاش مع لؤي حسين وريما فليحان وسلامة كيلة
استفاقة للحياة السياسية السورية… ما للمعارضة وما عليها
غدي فرنسيس

على خط السؤال والجواب من منطقة إلى أخرى خلال الأشهر الثلاثة الأخيرة، كانت تتكلم سوريا في السياسة طوال الوقت وفي كل دار.

عند السؤال، اختلفت إجاباتها. كانت أحياناً تكشف عن فرز طائفي جديد، وأحياناً عن وعي وطني مميّز، وأحياناً عن أمراض اجتماعية خطيرة…اختلفت مواقفها وآراؤها. كانت تكشف وجهاً جديداً في كل منطقة. ولعل أهم النقاشات، كانت مع من لم ينزلق خطابهم إلى الدفاع العاطفي، لا عن أخطاء النظام ولا عن تشوّهات “الثورة”. وهؤلاء كثر، ممتدون من مكاتب المسؤولين إلى “أوكار” المتظاهرين من درعا الجنوبية إلى حماه الشمالية، وما بينهما وما على جوانبهما.

تلك الشريحة المتسائلة المنتقدة المفكرة، سميّت بالأغلبية الصامتة، ولكنها ليست ولم تكن صامتة. لا بوق لها ولا مذياع، ولا إطار حزبي أو سياسي يُسمع الدنيا صوتها.. كانت ولا تزال تعايش يوميات الانتفاضة السورية وتداعياتها وتتقلب مع كل مرحلة جديدة. فيها وإليها وعليها مستقبل سوريا وساحة الاستقطاب السياسي خارج الخيارين المنتهيي الصلاحية: “البعث” و”الإخوان المسلمين”.

“أنا مع ميشال كيلو وبرهان غليون وطيب تيزيني وفايز سارة وهؤلاء المفكرين وذلك النوع من المعارضة” هكذا أجاب حسن حميدوش في ساحة جامعة دمشق في البرامكة منذ ثلاثة أشهر، بينما كان رفاقه يتظاهرون تأييداً في كلية الهندسة.

وفي مقاهي حمص، وضع أحمد ولقمان ونجوى تلك الأسماء على الطاولة للنقاش، وكذلك سامر ونبيل في مكتبة حماه، وعمر في ملحمة دوما.. في اللاذقية، كان جورج زريق يترقب مقالات “كيلو” و”سارة” كضوء جديد في عقله السياسي الحزبي. في حلب، كانت معارضة المجتمع المدني ممثلة بالدكتور فارس إيغو. عند بيت الحجازي نفحة مشابهة لتلك الأسماء، وفي السويداء كانت الشاعرة أميرة أبو الحسن نموذجاً عن هؤلاء المعارضين. من دمشق تكلم بلسانهم الكاتب نجيب نصير منذ أول الأحداث. أفكارهم ومعارضتهم “متفشية”. إنهم في كل مكان في سوريا، وأفكارهم على كل لسان.

وكان المؤتمر الأول من الداخل. وخرجت المعارضة الوطنية إلى الضوء، ودخلت في التاريخ من فندق دمشقي! فكان عليها هجوم مزدوج: التطرف على ضفتيه من الخارج والداخل. العاطفيون على نوعيْهم، المعارض والموالي، هاجموها، وشارع كبير استمع إليها وترقبها. شارع كان ينتظرها، وجد فيها “دواء مهدئا للعصفورية السورية”، لكنه يضعها اليوم أمام التحدي الأكبر مع الوقت والقدرة والفعالية في الإمساك بأرض الثورة. فماذا تقول اليوم؟

http://www.assafir.com/Article.aspx?EditionID=1885&ChannelID=44431&ArticleID=234

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:39 am

 

217. Abughassan said:

The regime allowed this meeting but did not expect,or may be they did,anybody to “deviate” from the announced program. As soon as a guy,I would like to know his name,declared that he wants the regime to be toppled he was physically attacked and kicked out,then a group of Bashar supporters,remember that was supposed to be an opposition meeting,started chanting god,Syria and Bashar only. Going back to why we need a regime change and why after 55 years of independence Syria is still a third world country.
Seculars need a guarantor of civil rights after an inevitable regime change,and Bashar does not equal Syria,so if he cannot perform and reform he needs to retire,and the army will serve as the guarantor until there is a civil elected government in charge.infiltrating an opposition meeting was intentional and the idea was to make the opposition looks bad.no wonder many opposition figures did not bother to attend,they knew what was being cooked,and no wonder the tv guy kept filming !!
The regime and that guy had the same objective: they want the meeting to fail.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:44 am

 

218. Abughassan said:

I meant to say ” 65 years of independence “. My apology to the “truth seekers” :)

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:49 am

 

219. Syrian Commando said:

I don’t mind people beating each other up or swearing at each other.

Just as long as no one gets killed and no one gets imprisoned.

There’s going to be tension at first but I hope to God we all get through this as a better, stronger more fair nation.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 12:02 pm

 

220. jad said:

Small steps! France didn`t get democracy in 4 months, The States didn’t get democracy in 4 months, in Taiwan and Korea they still beat each others in the parliament though they`ve been practicing democracy for more than 4 months..give it time people, let Syrians grow into democracy not the other way around. Sooner or later they will have rules and they will play within it, give them some time instead of criticizing every little small step they do.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 12:14 pm

 

221. jad said:

Dearest OTW,
Ali Attasi article was an answer to this disgusting news:

(معارضو أنطاليا) يدعمون تحرك فرنسيين صهاينة للضغط على سورية

نشرت صحف فرنسية عدة على مساحة نصف صفحة تقريباً إعلاناً مدفوع الأجر للدعوة إلى اجتماع شعبي يوم الاثنين في سينما سان جيرمان دوبريه في باريس تحت عنوان «وقف المجازر والأسد يجب أن يرحل»، بمبادرة من الفيلسوف الفرنسي «الصهيوني» برنار هنري ليفي وتحمل الدعوة تواقيع شخصيات مثل وزير الخارجية السابق برنار كوشنير ورئيس بلدية باريس بيرتراند دولانويه والفيلسوف اندريه كلوكسمان ورئيس الوزراء السابق لوران فابوس، وبمشاركة بعض من اعتبرتهم المبادرة من «ديمقراطيين سوريين» مثل عمار القربي وملحم الدروبي ممثل الإخوان المسلمين، وعهد الهندي ولمى الأتاسي ومحمد كركوتي وجورجيت علم.
واللافت أن ليفي، مهندس الحرب على ليبيا و«عراب» المجلس الانتقالي الليبي الذي نقل رسائل منه إلى بنيامين نتنياهو أطلق مبادرة «إس أو إس سورية» قبل أسابيع ودعا للتظاهر تحت عنوانها، فرد عليه عدد من شخصيات المعارضة السورية في فرنسا وطالبوه بأن «يجنب الشعب السوري دعمه».
ونشر برهان غليون وصبحي حديدي وفاروق مردم بيك حينها بياناً قالوا فيه إن «أشخاصاً كبرنار ليفي (…) معروفون بمعاداتهم للشعب الفلسطيني وقضيته ومساندون للاستيطان في الأراضي المحتلة الفلسطينية وكذلك الجولان السوري، يحاولون الاستيلاء على حركة الشعب السوري وتطلعه للحرية، وعليه أي مبادرة تنضوي تحت لواء هذا النداء لبرنار ليفي سنعتبرها محاولة للإساءة للحركة الديمقراطية السورية ومحاولة لجعلها تنحرف عن مسارها… كما أننا نأسف أن نرى أناساً كـ(ميشال) روكار و(فرانسوا) هولاند يخلطون أسماءهم مع أسماء مفكرين فرنسيين ساندوا احتلال العراق وصفقوا لدخول القوات الأميركية له».
واعتبر الموقعون على البيان أن النص الذي نشره ليفي وكل المبادرات التي يمكن أن تأخذها، في المستقبل، جماعة «لنجدة سورية»، ومهما كانت التسميات التي تتحرك تحتها الجماعة، فهي مناورة دنيئة تنوي حرف مسار المعارضة الديمقراطية السورية عن أهدافها، ومساس بصدقيتها أمام جماهيرها.
لكن رغم نداء المثقفين السوريين وتحذيرهم من مخططات ليفي وأهدافه، نجح الأخير بالحصول على دعم مما يعرف بـ«المؤتمر السوري للتغيير» أو «مؤتمر أنطاليا»، الذي أصبح شريكاً باجتماع يوم الاثنين المقبل في باريس (حسب إعلان الدعوة).
ومعروف أن تكاليف نشر الدعوات في الصحف وإقامة الاجتماع في باريس باهظة جداً ما يطرح السؤال عن «كرم الأخلاق» الذي يتحلى به هؤلاء الفلاسفة من أجل عيون الشعب السوري! واللافت أيضاً أن ليفي يعتبر من أكثر الذين ينتقدون الحركات الإسلامية وإذ به يضع يده بيد الإخوان المسلمين السوريين ويدعو ممثلاً عنهم إلى الاجتماع!
ويذكر أن آخر فصول تحركات ليفي بشأن سورية كانت رسالة حملت توقيع ليفي وستة كتاب آخرين منهم سلمان رشدي والإسرائيلي عاموس عوز، تطالب مجلس الأمن باعتماد قرار بشأن سورية.

الوطن
http://alwatan.sy/dindex.php?idn=104193

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 12:39 pm

 

222. louai said:

for some reason i cant see my comment

ANONYMOUS

its true history repeat itself no doubt about that ,but to understand what history will repeat itself you need to know what you reality we live in , for the revolutionists Syria s like Egypt or Tunis or Syria is still the same they left in the 80s ,any Syrian will write books about the corruption and many negative things in Syria if you ask him , BUT that dose not call for revolution against the government or the president and surely dose not call for revolution , you accuse everyone in here of being supporter and fo Bashar because he is either benefits or in denial because you are in denial yourself , people are not neccecerlly supporting the government but for sure same people are against the revolution because the revuloton did not sell itself to the decent citizens.

i know Bashar has support not only because of the massive rallies we saw in support of his reform but because of the massive resistance this revolution is facing from the decent Syrian people

‘To say that the “ONLY” man to have influence is Al 3r 3oor shows you know very little or next to nothing about whats going on.’
can you enlighten me ? give me one other name that if he tells those people to stop do Tkbeer and Takseer they will respond ! the sad fact is 3ar3orisim is the trademark of this revolution otherwise we would have seen better quality and quantity of people demonstrating
you wrote to SyrianNoKandahar
‘And please dont shed your crocodile tears for Nidal or anyone else. We all know who killed him and the tens of thousands of others over the past 40 years. Shame on you for showing fake sympathy.’
that’s my friend discredet you because off course we all know who killed Nidal we saw them on youtube ,we saw them on photos and we saw them on TV admitting , you clearly don’t know who is Nidal or you think other readers of the blog don’t

Peace

Louai

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 12:43 pm

 

223. Syrian Commando said:

LOUAI,

With all due respect my friend, you’re wasting your time. Him and OTW are both clowns. They have their ears and eyes closed, already made up their minds. No new information can enter and no original ideas can leave.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 12:45 pm

 

224. NK said:

Syrian Commando #194

Thanks for the comedy clip, as a physician I really enjoyed that piece of misinformation and false propaganda!

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:04 pm

 

225. Aatssi said:

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:07 pm

 

226. Atassi said:

FYI & be xxxtra carful please….
Many of the personalities on this form \comments are Mokhabart and part of the new misinformation strategy created by the group “ We love Bashar” “ ot MenHiback” …
I have be monitoring this form for a while and the same group of commentators are available for replies 24/7 ….

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:16 pm

 

227. Syrian Commando said:

NK,

As a holder of multiple degrees, I enjoy your sarcastic tone without anything backing it up. Please, burn your credibility away by explaining to us what exactly is comedic about it.

There will be questions afterwards so be sure to stick around.

#219

It’s called the weekend and honestly, a lot of us are up a lot longer than we want to worrying about our country. Are you related to the usual suspects?

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:38 pm

 

228. NK said:

Jad #207

Please tell me what kind of opposition, beats people up for making a statement while shouting “Allah, Souriya, Bashar w bas” ? Not to mention the guy jumping up and down yelling “you killed the Syrian army” … was there a guy spraying AMPHETAMINES (A.K.A irritants/carcinogens) in there as well ? LOL

The following is not addressed to you Jad, just so there’s no confusion.

Let me break it down to the mentally handicapped mukhabarat agents reading this blog. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD (or Bashar in your case) tell your stupid agents not to shout “Allah, Souriya, Bashar w bas” when they are posing as “opposition”.
لك ساويتونا مسخرة الله لا يعطيكون العافية فوق تعبكون

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:38 pm

 

229. jad said:

NK, :) small steps, after couple times of the same thing they will learn not to do that, just believe in the ‘Syrianism’ we are quick learner breeds.
Who went all the way to Spain and build ‘Andalusia’ can do something good back home. Just believe in our people.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:49 pm

 

230. Norman said:

NK,

Now that was dumb, wasn’t it, then, that is why we are where we are ,Isn’t it. we follow our emotions instead of our brains.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 2:49 pm

 

231. NK said:

Syrian Commando

Let’s just say solving an Amphetamine in water and spraying people is not an effective way to administer this drug, for more information please consult your local meth addict! ;)

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 4:54 pm

 

232. Syrian Commando said:

It’s not only amphetamines… *face palm*

This is why you don’t ask GPs about such things, they only know how to give people oral exams.

You are telling me you have never administered a Vitamin B-12 shot?

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 3rd, 2011, 11:32 pm

 

233. ANONYMOUS said:

OFF THE WALL & NK:

Guys, its pointless. I knew Rambo (COMMANDO) had pretty much zero credibility from his past “neutral” posts. But the “terrorists spraying irritants…” comment and the ‘highly credible’ link was just too much. That took the cake as they say. And to top it off, he links to vitamin B12 boosters in a spray can that can be purchased on amazon.com by anyone in the world as the ‘secret substance’. So i guess the Yemeni kid in the video went online and bought some from amazon.com.

C’mon, this has gone way past the realm of absurdity….

LOUAI

So you think the major issue here is ONE man asking people to shout “Allahu Akbar” right? You think the people in the street are rallying only to be shot / killed / tortured / arrested and threatened because someone asked them to? Are you serious? Do you really think that low of Syrians?

And since you and the other assad-loyalists (aka Syrian Electronic Army) on this blog have gone to great length to discredit pro-revolution youtube videos, all you have offered as proof of your ‘sinister sunni/jihadi/salafi plot’ are youtube videos (some of which are re-broadcasted on Adduniya and Syria TV) as evidence????

Rambo,

You mentioned you saw “the sprayers” at multiple protests? Is this in ‘real life’? Or on youtube via Adduniya? Or were you experiencing a delusional dream brought on by exposure to this evil amazon.com vitamin B12 substance while at a protest?

Because if your experience was in ‘real-life’ then what were you doing at an anti-assad protest? Hang on a second, as an assad-loyalist i thought you guys were supposed to tow the party line that “There are no protests, everything is normal”? Ahhh, im sorry, that was a couple weeks ago….do continue….

With regards to your amazon.com vitamin B12 spray-can plot, you said you hold multiple degrees, in that case, and solely based on that statement, then of course we all believe you, i mean, why didn’t you say that from the start? You could have ended the whole argument then and there. as we all know, people with ‘multiple degrees’ need no evidence to back their claims. We’ll take your ‘multiple degree’ word for it.

Peace

ANONYMOUS

PS, ALLAHU AKBAR!!!

(excuse me guys, Al Aa3 3oor and a salafi gunman with a squirt gun loaded with the amazon.com vitamin B12 booster made me inadvertently shout (type) that out.)

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 2:19 am

 

234. Usama said:

This second conference at Samiramis was not an “opposition” conference. It was composed mainly of past and current independent members of Parliament (Majlis ash-Sha`b) (I think around 80 seats are reserved for independents). I don’t know who that person is who was talking about toppling the regime, but he had angered a lot of people earlier by insulting the army al-Jazeera style. People didn’t do anything when he did that and kept quiet until he decided to unilaterally declare that the “people” want to topple the regime.

Even though everyone in Syria wants to see change, it is very naive to start assuming that everyone in these conferences wants to go as far as toppling the regime. Chanting for Bashar does not mean rejection of a more representative Parliament with free elections.

By the way, a current independent member of Parliament, Habash (I forgot his first name) did the same with insulting the army’s role and has been doing so for over a month now, and even on state TV! He hasn’t been beaten… yet, lol. I think anyone who wants to undermine the army’s role, and especially during the current crisis, should be viewed with suspicion. Not beaten (yet), but watched.

Also I don’t think the owner of Samiramis will accept to host such meetings anymore.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 2:40 am

 

235. Syrian Commando said:

ANONYMOUS CLOWN,

>You mentioned you saw “the sprayers” at multiple protests? Is this in ‘real life’?

Videos, I wouldn’t approach those monkeys if you paid me.

>Hang on a second, as an assad-loyalist

Your credibility is not just zero, it’s negative by now.

>We’ll take your ‘multiple degree’ word for it.

Better than taking NK’s “amphetamine” claim for it. Guess what: skin is pourous and there are many nerve irritants that can be absorbed. You don’t find the spraying suspicious at all?

Your absolutely preposterous and unreasonable. God forbid a weapon should ever make its way to your hands for many innocent people will die. Seriously, go hang yourself and spare us all. Your gadfly behaviour is atypical of Syrians who are calm and collected when trying to discuss things reasonably. You’re not fooling anyone American. Piss off.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 3:22 am

 

236. NK said:

Syrian Commando

Please do yourself a favor and read a couple pages about these compounds before you post your comments, you’re embarrassing yourself.

Vit B12 has no effect on a healthy individual (in most people it’s also not toxic even in large doses), so unless those demonstrators are vegans, alcoholics or pregnant, B12 will most likely have no effect on them.

Oh and by the way, like Amphetamines, solving this vitamin in a bucket of water and spraying people is not an effective way to administer it.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 4:24 am

 

237. Syrian Commando said:

I don’t know much about that side of biology (pharmacology), but I know that skin can absorb both substances readily. I actually want a real response not just laughter. You could go a long way if you treated people with respect.

If you’re sure, I will write to Addounia and SNN to let them know.

I just know the behaviour of some of the protestors is overtly aggressive. There are some people jumping up and down infront of a rubbish bin and there’s no one on the other side listening to them. They look like they’re all on meth.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 5:04 am

 

238. ANONYMOUS said:

Rambo,

Im suuuuuuuuure you’ll write Adduniya and Syria TV regarding the amazon.com B12 vitamin booster spray substance who’s lethal effects as you claim seem to be “making people jump up and down in-front of rubbish bins”.

As they say…3laa 3arsi!

Very self-destructive behavior indeed and very astute observations by yourself from youtube video analysis indeed.

Funny enough, vitamin B12 actually promotes brain activity and large doses well….let the experts chime in (as i dont have many multiple degrees that you carry):

“Vitamin B12 has extremely low toxicity and even taking it in enormous doses appears not to be harmful to healthy individuals”

http://www.usingvitaminswisely.com/vitamin-b12-overdose.html
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa060900
http://wisemensvitamins.com/vitamin-b12-side-effects/
http://www.vitaminddeficiencysymptomsguide.com/vitamin-b12-overdose/

But never-mind those ‘experts’. I think your right Rambo, i believe Rami Makhloufs mouthpiece over any published material any-day. His TV station is 100% neutral and factual with no agenda or bias whatsoever.

Rambo also Said:

“God forbid a weapon should ever make its way to your hands for many innocent people will die”

Yes Rambo, im sure i could wreak tremendous havoc upon the world with a can of amazon.com vitamin b12 booster sprays. WATCH OUT! hahahahahaha….

Peace

ANONYMOUS

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 7:23 am

 

239. Syrian Commando said:

ANONY MOUSE,

In your case I’d recommend some Lithium.

And a chemical castration, to make your posts shorter and more calm. ;)

Unlike you, I’m able to admit when I’m wrong but I’m still not entirely convinced this is water being used to “cool” the protestors. Something is influencing this criminal behaviour:

Signed,

-Rambo

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 7:37 am

 

240. Samara said:

Whats funny is how Anonymous always puts “peace” at the end of his/her comments. Its really ironic, how someone who supports the violent and bloody revolution, the violent and bloody revolutionaries and in turn the violent and bloody MB, would be wishing “peace”. Now, please tell me how your stance in this debacle of ours constitutes “peace”? Im just taking a guess here and saying that it doesnt constitute much, other than death and terrorism. Which is obviously what you support. In that case, “peace” be with you and the revolution and its affiliates. The peace that you and your homies so enthusiastically express in your violent protests.

God bless Bashar and his army, and his Syrian Electronic Army. God bless Maher. God bless all good people.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 7:45 am

 

241. Syrian Commando said:

Samara,

Much like “democracy” and “freedom”, “peace” is now a symbol that has been hijacked. What peace meant was an end to a conflict, now its a general symbol meaning “good”. Of course, there can be no end to general conflict while sentient beings are alive, so really the only way to achieve “peace” in the way they mean it, is to kill everyone.

This is why they as well as Israel push for “peace” — in Israel’s case they want everyone who is not a Zionist Jew to perish or become enslaved. In the case of the hardened and deaf “revolution” people on here (TARA, OTW, ANONYMOUS and a few others), they want to kill everyone who disagrees with them.

You can see why, for example, the video I posted above is of “peaceful” terrorists: they aim to rid them of their opponents, thus ending the conflict!

The symbol has been hijacked, and if I must, I will use it towards them:

Peace.

Doesn’t read the same way now, does it?

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 8:06 am

 

242. Samara said:

Syrian Commando,

You hit it on the shnoz. And your perfectly right in all you said. And it doesnt read the same way!

May the true meaning of peace come to Syria and its people. And may the hijaked peace be on those who preach it.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 8:33 am

 

243. louai said:

تركيا : خمسة آلاف لاجىء سوري عادوا إلى بلادهم : مسموح لهم مشاهدة “الجزيرة” و”العربية” فقط!؟
الإثنين, 04 تموز/يوليو 2011 03:21
أرسل إلى صديق طباعة PDF

أنقرا ، الحقيقة ( خاص من باهار ألتوغ) : قالت “وكالة إدارة الأوضاع الطارئة” التركية اليوم ( أمس) على موقعها إن أكثر من خمسة آلاف لاجىء سوري عادوا إلى بلادهم بحلوا يوم أمس . وبحسب الوكالة التابعة لرئاسة مجلس الوزراء التركي ، والمسؤولة عن غوث اللاجئين وضحايا الكوارث ، إن 343 لاجئا عادوا خلال اليومين الماضيين ، ليرتفع العدد الكلي للعائدين حتى يوم أمس إلى 5001 ، بينما بقي منهم 10227 بمن عشرون لاجئا فقط عبروا من سوريا إلى تركيا خلال اليومين الماضيين.

على الصعيد نفسه ، كشف عدد من اللاجئين السوريين الذين تمكنا من الاتصال بهم من أنقرا أن السلطات التركية المعنية بالإشراف على مخيمات اللاجئين السوريين ” لا تسمح لهم” بمشاهدة أي قنوات عربية سوى قناتي ” العربية” و “الجزيرة” . وبحسب لاجىء سوري يدعى ” م . قطرون ” ، وهو عامل تمديدات صحية من قرية ” بيت قطرون ” التابعة لجسر الشغور ، فإن اللاجئين طلبوا مشاهدة قنوات أخرى أيضا ، بما فيها ” القنوات السورية الرسمية” ، إلا أن إدارة المخيم رفضت طلبهم ، دون أن تبين الأسباب . وقد أكد ” ب . ك ” ، وهو عامل في معمل سكر جسر الشغور ومن قرية ” الغسانية”، هذه المعلومات مضيفا القول ” إن لجنة انضباط المخيم ، وهي من اللاجئين السوريين الإسلاميين ، هي من منع ذلك . وقد علمنا أنهم طلبوا من إدارة المخيم رسميا عدم السماح بوجود سوى القناتين المذكورتين ” ( “العربية” و “الجزيرة”). أما ” فيصل . س ” فأضاف القول ” لجنة الانضباط تشبه أي فرع مخابرات سوري ، فهي تتجسس علينا وتجمع عنا معلومات من عناصر دسوها بيننا ، وكل من يشتمون من حديثه وجود رغبة لديه بالعودة ، يرسلون له من يقنعه إما بالكلام أو بالتهديد لئلا يعود” . أما ” منير . ف” ، من قرية”الناجية” ، فقد أشار إلى أن ” الكثير من الأسماء التي سمعنا من قناة الجزيرة وقناة العربية أن أصحابها ماتوا أو قتلوا أو اعتقلوا ، تبين لنا لاحقا عبر الاتصالات الهاتفية التي أجريناها ، أنهم لم يزالوا أحياء وأحرارا “. وقد اشتكى الجميع من الأوضاع”المزرية” التي يعيشونها ، وأبدوا سخرية مما سمعوه عن أنهم ” لاجئون خمس نجوم”! وتحدث بعضهم عن أن هناك نقصا حتى في حليب الأطفال.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 10:10 am

 

244. louai said:

ANONYMOUS @226

i am more than happy to discuss any matter with any fellow Syrian specially from the opposition even with none Syrian ,we are going throw tough times and communicating with each other is very healthy to make a clear pictuer of at least what we want
no my friend Anonymous i would advice you to change your name and share your ideas with us under new ID but this time don’t claim you ae Syrian ,that would give you a lot of credibility even ,i think you have some knowledge to share with us but dont pretend to be a Syrian when you are not , you clearly speak very limited Arabic and from your reply to my comment you haven’t even made a google search regarding Nidal Janood to know who is he and what is his story .
Therefore i shall listen to my fellow Syrian Citizen commando and not waste my time replying to you, no disrespect but i most say you are hurting the very cause you are trying to support by pretending being some one eles .

Syrian Commando @216

You are right, thank you

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 10:33 am

 

245. William Scott Scherk said:

I am unable to edit my last comment, as it has been marked as spam. Sorry for the off-topic note, but would like to respond to Jad, Abughassan and Syrian Commando and am not able to figure out what I am doing wrong.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 4:30 pm

 

246. William Scott Scherk said:

I am becoming more adept at reading Google machine translations of Assafir and other published stories, thanks to Jad. I now know that when I read Glandular Francis it means Michel Kilo! I now know what bridge of the vacancy and tenderness and shield and other odd-in-English terms mean to Syrian geography.

Abughassan, I read you as a type of informed bellwether here at Syrian Comment. Never do you stoop to insult, you offer analysis and sober comment, and never dehumanize or otherwise denigrate fellow Syrians. I respect you sir, and thank you. From my distance in Vancouver, with no personal connections to Syria but a heart caught by events, you provide a voice that rings true and sincere, and I know that you could sit in a room with conferees and emerge with consensus. If I had to place you on a kind of political spectrum representing Syrian opinion, I hope I would be accurate to see you as the absolute centre here.

My only disagreement with you might be over posting videos of mourners or killings. This is reality, and some of us do not have the connections of Revlon to be aware of the details. He names names, he invites grieving for those who may have been brutalized by shadowy forces of security. The story of the son arrested and returned dead is heartbreaking. I understand your anguish at these deaths and horrors, but can it be shut away? All the passings are marked by grief and shock and sorrow. Please allow more room for Revlon’s anguish in your heart . . . and do not merely assign him to a group that ‘exploits’ such things.

In some senses Revlon is just one or two steps away from the organizations of the LCCs, so in another way it is important to the breadth of the forum’s range of opinion that this perspective and message be noted, not dismissed.^

– I have several further links giving names of the folks in the Semiramis Lights Out initiative, but am not able to post anything with links today. Will try again later . . .

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 4:36 pm

 

247. William Scott Scherk said:

Abughassan writes (210):

The regime allowed this meeting but did not expect,or may be they did, anybody to “deviate” from the announced program. As soon as a guy,I would like to know his name, declared that he wants the regime to be toppled he was physically attacked and kicked out, then a group of Bashar supporters, remember that was supposed to be an opposition meeting, started chanting god,Syria and Bashar only. Going back to why we need a regime change and why after 55 years of independence Syria is still a third world country.

The fellow who got a bit shouty at the Lights Out meeting was the former pastor at Adra Prison, one Majid Radwan Salha. He resigned from his job in a statement subsequent to his expulsion by Al-Ghoulian and friends, released on video here**. The grey-haired man who struck Salha is loyalist Zuhair Al-Ghaloum

The odd things about the altercation have been listed already, but what struck me was the shoutiness of Salha; I wonder if he would not have been struck by Al-Ghaloum and subsequently ejected had he not been so loud. It was obvious Salha had captured some of the microphones of the press contingent, so why not just seize the opportunity, have a lengthy say and then go for dinner with colleagues? Surely the media would have let every single person there yammer on at the cameras given the chance . . . so I wish Salha had used his moment in a different way.

That said, the organizer Mohammed Al-Habash (independent MP) got a bit shouty himself, as seen in the lengthy Day-Press video report** of the National Initiative (Lights Out) meetings. Note Al-Ghoulian beside him. One more video** from the folks that provided Jad’s link suggest that zero actual conferring happened in the dark ballroom. No one sat down. No one suggested a moment of silence. Nobody distributed the agenda and moved that the conferring members get down to discussion. Essentially a bunch of unnamed folks jostling for cameras to yap at.

Where’s your list of attendees, speakers, as with Glandular Francis’s well-planned get-together? Where’s your web page, your statements, your conclusions, your spokesman, your plans? Where was your organizational skills, boys?

What would have happened there at the Semiramis, too, had the hotel management, under control of owners Salim and Muhammad Deeb Daaboul, initially did their job of hosting an approved meeting? If someone sowed disorder there, who?

And if it turns out only 40 of the ‘independent’ contingent actually managed to get past hotel staff/security . . . who were the rest of the folks who stormed into the gathering — the same ones who shouted for Bashar?

____________

** No links allowed today, sorry!

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 4:53 pm

 

248. Syrian Commando said:

WSS,

I’m still not sure who that guy who was talking on the camera that started the fight was.

Really a low point in Syrian civic society. I wish the boys would leave the men to do their thing.

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 4th, 2011, 7:15 pm

 

249. William Scott Scherk said:

Majid Radwan Salha, pastor of the Adra prison until this expulsion. He quit his position, and made a video statement here: http://goo.gl/Ujn6z

Al-Habash is an moderate islamist Independent Worker and Peasant sector MP for Damascus, Comrade, an imam – Director of the al-Assad Qur’an Institute, rumoured to have been a confidant of the present president.

Here is his page from the Syrian Parliament: http://goo.gl/oEolU

Another angle on the Al-Habash bash, a video from Orient TV that covers the surge past the hotel staff up the stairs: http://goo.gl/pXAFV

Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

July 5th, 2011, 1:17 am

 

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 [5] Show All

Post a comment


× 9 = eighty one