Is the Free Syrian Army Real? - Syria Comment

Is the Free Syrian Army Real?

Is the Free Syrian Army real?

It is now being claimed that the video which surfaced yesterday of the seven officers who claim to be the commanders of the Free Syrian Army is not what it seems to be. The video I have posted above claims to demonstrate that different officers are wearing the identical uniform. Presumably, the makers of the videos are dressing up different men in the same Colonel’s uniform so they can pose as high ranking officers.

A second video uploaded to youtube on 5 July 2011 shows the same officer who spoke in yesterday’s video (see the top of my last post). Some have suggested he is speaking from a foreign country. This makes sense because young babies are clearly audible in the background. It would be too dangerous to do this from one’s home. In another video of Shaykh `Ar`our on Wisal TV, Colonel Ahmad Hijazi calls in. He is one of the seven soldiers. He has babies crying in the background, as well. One could not phone in from Syria without the Mukhabarat potentially listing to the phone call. Certainly, one would not risk this with his baby children in the back room. This would suggest that the leaders of the Free Syrian Army are in Turkey, Jordan or Saudi Arabia and not in Syria.

syau writes in the comment section:

Watch out Syrian Arab Army, 7 so called defectors have formed their own army to fight you. The desperation of this ‘revolution’ is hilarious.

Aboud Responds:

@2 Your nervous laugh is understandable. That was a colonel in the video, who probably has under him any number of majors, who also command captains, who also give orders to lieutenants. Care to hazard a guess how many conscripts those lieutenants command?

(Of course, none of the Baathists want to mention Abukamal, and the way the whole garrison there defected two weeks ago)

It takes an enormous amount of guts to defect from the Syrian army. There is no going back, if caught they will be executed on the spot. They will be risking everything to defend their neighborhoods, families and friends, and they won’t even have the benefit of a fake amnesty.

The fact that any soldier or officer at all would think of defecting is remarkable. The fact that so many have in increasing numbers is nothing short of miraculous.

The courage and resilience displayed by the Syrian people has been truly remarkable. It puts to shame those other nations and peoples who gave up or compromised for less of an excuse.

Ya Mara Ghalba

See the video uploaded to youtube on 5 July 2011, which shows the same purported army defector as the one who’s speaking in the video linked to by Joshua. This purported traitor looks so relaxed, here, I’m willing to bet he’s in a far-off foreign country:

Joshua’s video should be presumed by every sensible person to be fictitious and foreign-produced, with none of the seven people in it being residents in Syria in recent years.

Abu Umar said:

It’s clear that these menhebek thugs support the slaughter, jailing and torture of tens of thousands of Syrians. Do you expect those who have been oppressed to be killed by your regime and for them to smile at you? Be careful what you wish for and you will remember the days of Ar’oor fondly.

Souri333 (formerly Souri) said:

Where is this army located?? Is it in Syria or in dreamland?? How many tanks and planes does it have??

Who told you the regime can’t survive if the rebellion spreads to Aleppo and Damascus?? Who told you these two cities are “silent”?? Do you think the rebellion has not spread to Damascus yet??

I stopped taking this blog seriously long ago because it has become too absurd.

Majed97 said:

Assuming those officers are true defectors, does that legitimize this chaos that is destroying the country?! Should we now abandon all peaceful and gradual reform efforts, and instead join those defectors and expand this conflict to a full blown civil war?!

In a country like Syria with deep sectarian and tribal divide, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that a handful of the 500,000 military personnel may have their loyalty lies elsewhere. It happens in every country during conflicts, where some soldiers/officers disobey orders. The question should be asked: how does any government in the world treat defectors? They arrest them and try in a military court. The military establishment is not a democratic institution…

Abu Ghassan writes:

This group of seven is a pathetic political stunt and a clear indication of the confusion that dominates the situation in Syria.
I learned that none of the officers were from the Alawi sect, not that it makes any real difference,and none of them held a position of any significance. Those officers may, and they have the right to be, unhappy with the regime like most Syrians, but their action will reduce them to a toy in the hands of bigger and more sinister players. Any effort to divide or harm the army is a blow to the country’s unity and safety. Those of you who are cheering this theatrical move are in need of a heavy dose of Syrian tea on top of a loaded Falafel Sandwich.

The regime is obviously trying to buy time now, and what was supposed to take place in September is now pushed to the end of the year. the only language this regime understands is pressure but not the type of pressure armed thugs are applying. It is the civil political pressure that will help keep this movement on track. People who kill, destroy and terrorize must be condemned and isolated by the opposition, and the lack of that condemnation and isolation is very harmful to the credibility of the opposition. New propaganda coming from albaath dinosaurs who are starting to feel the heat and want to preserve article-8 and prevent open elections. We will be watching!

Tara Asked:

We discussed Al Buti on SC a day or 2 ago. Is he still giving sermon in Umayad mosque? Some of my relative are/were established Sunni “figures” and I bet they think like Buti (and I have no respect for them) . I do not like the way Muslim figures dress. I want to have a dress revolution too. They all should wear a suit if it was up to me.

Tara said:

I just watched Aljazeera. There were massive demonstrations yesterday. The footages are coming now. Altabaqa joined in. Douma is amazing as ever. Bzourieh in Damascus demonstrating too. Looks very uplifting.

N.Z. said:

Baathist and non-Baathist,

I urge you all to see this interview with Muhammad Aref Kayali, an insider from the onset of the Baathist Syrian Party. A man of substance, a realist. Archive quality. Worth watching.

Ya Mara Ghalba writes:

Joshua likes to report what’s being said in the New York Times and doesn’t like to report what’s being said in Al-Watan. That is, the blog is skewed towards quoting sources that don’t know what they’re talking about when it comes to Syria. One result is the illusion that Syrian society hasn’t yet overwhelmingly rejected all anti-regime alternatives — the illusion that the society hasn’t yet proven itself immune to the germs.

Over the past four months, conscious support for the Assad government has increased substantially. Among the educated and more liberal-minded Syrians right now, it is only a tiny minority of dissident cranks who do not consciously and positively support the government. The outsiders who think those dissident cranks are virtuous are ignorant bigots.

Ammar Abdulhamid in the LA Times

“I think the month of Ramadan will indeed be a turning point for the revolution,” said Ammar Abdul-Hamid, a Syrian opposition activist and dissident in the United States. “During Ramadan, every day will likely be a Friday, and Assad’s security forces, army troops and death squads will have tremend..

One dead, 500 arrested in Damascus roundup, Agence France-Presse, Jul 30, 2011

NICOSIA // Security forces shot dead one civilian and arrested more than 500 people in the Qadam district of Damascus, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Saturday.

“Soldiers and a large number of security agents entered Qadam at 3:00 am on Friday (0000 GMT) and cordoned off the area,” said Rami Abdel Rahman of the Britain-based rights group.

“More than 500 people were arrested during the operation, and one young man was killed at a security roadblock,” he added.

Abdel Rahman said the authorities also banned public funerals in the district, and said the young man was quickly buried in the presence of security officials to forestall any demonstrations.

“The army put up barricades at all entrances to the area, and heavily armed members of the security forces carried out searches and made arrests,” he said, adding that they had lists of names of people hostile to the regime.

“Security forces broke down doors when they weren’t opened quickly enough, and then they posted people on the roofs of houses during the four-hour operation, he said.

Minister of Environmental Affairs: Bombing of Oil Pipeline Damages Economy, Harms Public Health and Environment Cham Press, Jul 30, 2011

HOMS, (SANA) – State Minister of Environmental Affairs Kawkab Dayeh on Saturday affirmed that the bombing of the petroleum pipeline by terrorist groups which took place on Friday near Tal Housh dam targets national economy, damages the environment and hams public health and livelihoods.

Deir ez-Zor bombing of oil pipeline claimed by opposition on a Facebook page

Open Letter from a Syrian Arab priest to Alain Juppe, France’s Foreign Minister

LETTRE OUVERTE D’UN PRETRE ARABE DE SYRIE A ALAIN JUPPE, MINISTRE DES AFFAIRES ETRANGERES DE LA FRANCE,

Monsieur le Ministre,
Prêtre arabe de Syrie, je viens d’apprendre à l’instant votre déclaration aux États-Unis, touchant la légitimité de notre Président de la République.
En tant que syrien, je ne puis rester silencieux face à une telle ingérence dans les affaires de mon pays.
Professeur d’Université, vous n’êtes pas censé ignorer que la légitimité d’un Président de République, dépend du consensus de son peuple uniquement, et non de l’arbitraire d’une puissance quelconque.
Ministre des Affaires Étrangères d’un pays comme la France, vous êtes censé savoir que la Syrie est un État Souverain, membre fondateur des Nations-Unies.
Mais, porte-parole grisé de certains maîtres du monde actuel, vous croyez pouvoir décider à volonté du sort des autres pays, dont la Syrie.

….
Pr. Elias Zehlaoui

PERE ELIAS ZEHLAOUI EST LE FONDATEUR ET DIRECTEUR DE LA “CHORALE DE LA JOIE” qui compte 500 choristes et il est très actif dans le domaine du dialogue islamo-chrétien


Women and the Syrian Protests: Chanel 4 BBC

CNN: Human rights group: 7 deaths in Syria violence

“Journalist Alexander Page, who said he was with protesters who were marching from Damascus’ Midan neighborhood to Zahera, reported that he saw three people shot when security forces aimed into the crowd and

fired. Four buses carrying “regime thugs and riot police” had arrived on the scene, and security forces were stopping cars and beating people, Page said.

The wounded were picked up by security forces and taken away in buses, Page said.

He said a man on a motorbike filmed the faces of protesters as he drove past them. They chased and beat him, Page said.”

Opposion seeking to prepare the Syrian youth to rule” – Syrian activist, 29/07/2011

Beirut, Asharq Al-Awsat – Syrian academic and political activist Najib Ghadbain, who is also a member of the Syrian Opposition Consultative Council, informed Asharq Al-Awsat that the Syrian opposition has “entered a new phase of operations, within the framework of preparing the Syrian youth for leadership following the collapse of the regime.”

Ghadbain attended the recent meeting of Syrian opposition groups in Istanbul earlier this week, and he stressed that “the objective of the previous meetings that were held in Turkey [e.g Anatalya summit] was merely to bring together Syrian political activists abroad to find a way of supporting the revolution and to allow the Syrian voices to be heard by international public opinion.”

He added “as for the Istanbul meeting, its objective is to bring together a large group of Syrian youth, from inside Syria and abroad, and prepare them [for rule], by enrolling them in intensive training courses focusing on several subjects, including legal issues, international relations, media, as well as defining concepts such as citizenship, minority rights, and others.”

He also stressed that “the Syrian youth activists require such training, for one of the jobs of repressive regimes is to kill the youth’s interests in politics” adding that “it is essential for the Syrian youth to gain these basic skills, particularly as a broad section of this youth will be leaders in the forthcoming stage; therefore it is our duty to prepare the youth in this regard.”

Ghadbain also told Asharq Al-Awsat that “the youth who have undertaking these training courses will be working to share what they learn with their colleagues [who could not attend the summit], particularly as there is a lack of political awareness amongst the Syrian youth in general.” However Ghadbain acknowledged that the Syrian youth had “learnt a lot by organizing and participating in the demonstration [against the Syrian regime].” He added that “the forthcoming stage is extremely sensitive and we must be ready to meet any challenges.”

As for differences of opinion between the Syrian youth on the ground and the Syrian political opposition, Ghadbain said that “there can be no doubt that the Syrian elite, or the so-called more traditional Syrian political opposition, is not capable of leading the street protests. However both sides have recently discovered that they need one another, for the youth need the expertise of the traditional political opposition, whilst the opposition is in need of the youth’s enthusiasm.”

He also revealed that “the Istanbul meeting was held at the request of the youth, who wanted to develop themselves.”

Ghadbain stressed that “the [Syrian] opposition is seeking to show the world’s leaders that there is an alternative to the al-Assad regime that is capable of filling the vacuum in the forthcoming stage.” He added that “as for the rumors of the establishment or formation of an [opposition] national salvation or transitional government, there can be no doubt that we would support this when the time comes.”

The Libyan rebels’ military commander was killed by his comrades Huffington Post

while in custody after he was arrested by the opposition’s leadership on suspicion of treason, witnesses said Friday, in a sign of disarray that posed a major setback for the movement battling Moammar Gadhafi.

The slaying of Abdel-Fattah Younis raised fear and uncertainty in Benghazi, the de facto rebel capital. Thousands marched behind his coffin, wrapped in the rebels’ tricolor flag, to the graveyard for his burial, chanting that he was a martyr “beloved by God.” Troops fired a military salute as the coffin arrived, and angry and grieving supporters fired wildly into the air with automatic weapons.

At the graveside, Younis’ son, Ashraf, broke down, crying and screaming as they lowered the body into the ground and – in a startling and risky display in a city that was the first to shed Gadhafi’s rule nearly six months ago – pleaded hysterically for the return of the Libyan leader to bring stability.

“We want Moammar to come back! We want the green flag back!” he shouted at the crowd, referring to Gadhafi’s national banner.

Younis’ slaying appeared to shake both the rebels’ leadership body, the National Transitional Council, and its Western allies, who have heavily backed the rebels controlling most of eastern Libya.

Fighters from a rebel faction known as the February 17 Martyr’s Brigade came to the operations room and demanded Younis come with them for interrogation…. Younis trusted them and went alone.”… they killed him.”

The February 17 Martyrs Brigade is a group made up of hundreds of civilians who took up arms to join the rebellion. Their fighters participate in the front-line battles with Gadhafi’s forces but also act as a semi-official internal security force for the opposition. Some of its leadership comes from the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, an Islamic militant group that waged a campaign of violence against Gadhafi’s regime in the 1990s….

France’s Le Monde newspaper took a harsher view, warning that the rebels’ version of events “is hardly reassuring” and gives reason “to doubt the capacity of the council to exercise power.” “This risks reinforcing Tripoli’s hand,” Le Monde wrote.

Turkey’s failure in Syrian crisis

One should always keep this statement in mind: “the Kurds always look upon Turkey with suspicion.” This consequently leads to: “The Turkish involvement in any issue leads to the Kurdish distancing from it.”

Substantiating such a conclusion might require plentiful evidence, but one cannot disregard the fact that Abdullah Ocalan, the Leader of Kurdistan Workers’ Party in Turkey, lived in Turkey for years. This didn’t imply the proximity of Syria to the Kurds, because Damascus was reluctant to grant Syrian citizenship to northeastern Kurdish settlers and would only reconsider the matter in the face of the pressure of the current wave of demonstrations.

A conference hosting the adversaries of Bashar Assad, the Syrian Prime Minister, was held in Turkey some time ago with participants who ran the whole oppositional gamut. A similar meeting was due in Damascus and the two assemblies were supposed to nominate 75 people to the Syrian Transitory Council, similar to the Libyan Transitory National Council. The Damascus meeting was not held and 25 nominees were chosen in Istanbul. But this could not conceal the fragility of and the internal divisions among the Syrian regime’s opposition from sight.

The fact of some of the participants warning against the presence of the Islamist Majority (Akhvan al Moslemin) aside, the Kurdish figures decided to walk out of the meeting since they were against the phrase: the “Arabic” Republic of Syria. It lighted upon other oppositionists too that the cost of a consensus among all opposition groups exceeds their imagination. This discord came to a head when the Kurds hoisted Kurdistan’s flag in the Istanbul summit and in response to protests from others said that you, too, have raised the Turkish flag!

One of the causes of Syria’s Kurds continuing in their cooperation with the other opposition groups can be seen to be Turkey’s policy with regard to Syria’s revolts. From the very outset Turkey’s senior officials expressed their lack of patience with the slowness of the reforms process in Syria and voiced their extreme displeasure of suppressing the opposition. Every time the Syrian Presidency made a speech on the implementation of reforms, voices were heard from Ankara crying out that Bashar Assad is short of time and will have to capitulate to the demands of the opposition within a few days.

It goes without saying that the rigid and robust body of Syria’s politics has not exhibited much flexibility for reforms and softness against the demands of the opposition. Some trace this to internal disputes within the Syrian regime on the execution of reforms and contend that on the expansion of reforms Bashar Assad is facing greater pressure from internal opposition than the streets and public demonstrations.

According to reports the Syrian government is observing the developments in its Kurd-settled regions, especially in Qamishli, very keenly. There hasn’t been much conflict between the police and the military and the public in the Kurd-settled regions. Some negotiations have been made with the Kurdish parties, such as Kurdistan Workers’ Party – the Syrian branch, and the conclusion has been that the military wing of this party to take up security in Kurd-inhabited areas. This was a clear message to Turkey that Damascus, too, has some cards up its sleeves that it can play with inside Turkey.

Following Turkey’s blatant intervention in Syria, Jalal Talabani and Massoud Barzani, two Iraqi Kurdish leaders, vehemently supported Syria and Iraq’s Prime Minister also refused to go along with Turkey’s intervention and even signed an agreement to send 150,000 barrels of oil to diminish Syria’s economic plights and received a group consisting of 150 Syrian businessmen to strengthen the economic ties between the two countries. This comes at a time when only a while back Nouri Almaleki accused Syria of sending saboteurs and weapons into Iraq.

An important factor inside Turkey also deserves mention: the approximately 20 million Alawis who can’t bear to witness their government imposing pressure upon Syria’s Alawis. The continuation of the interventions of America, France, Turkey, and Qatar in Syria’s current issues might cause a rerun of the incidents of the city of Homs, but on a larger scale, a city which witnessed for the first time a religious conflict between the pro- and anti-government people where both sides attacked each other with firearms which claimed the lives of 30 people. This incident induced Syria’s Minister of Foreign Affairs to state that the national unity of his country has been targeted.

Militarily speaking, the entrance of the Syrian army into areas close to Turkey’s border, particularly Jisr al Shughour, is a step further than Syria’s internal incidents. Syria executed the “precipice” policy with regard to Turkey and sent special units of its army to its border with Turkey. Ankara’s calculations for inciting division and split in Syria’s army failed and Ankara gradually cut down on its propaganda assaults upon Syria. For the first time in 17 years Syria’s army entered into regions, which based on agreements with Turkey on Ocalan, were considered arms-free regions.

Based upon what was stated in propagandas and by some Arabic news networks, the Syrian regime deploys the Alawi units of its army to cleanse the border regions and the Fourth division of its Army has been dispatched to the border regions, but the reality is that the Fifteenth Division entered the fray, most of whose commander and soldiers are Sunni Syrians.

As was the case with Libya, not only Turkey, but also France will have to reconsider its policies towards Syria. Sarkozy was the first western Prime Minister to officially recognize the Libyan Transitional National Council and assumed the commandership of the assault against Gaddafi, but France’s Defense and Foreign Secretaries openly say that Gaddafi’s opponents should not expect a military triumph and should yield to a diplomatic solution instead. This solution, the responsibility of whose marketing has been bestowed upon the Representative of the United Nations Secretary General, has proved so shocking to the Gaddafi opposition that they have threatened to charge this international organization with failing to remain impartial in the Libyan crisis.

Daniel Levy, “America’s Attempted Quartet Sophistry,” Foreign Policy, July 22, 2011.

BILAL Y. SAAB AND NICHOLAS BLANFORD, “Seeing Red Along the Blue Line: Five years after the end of the Israel-Hezbollah war, both sides are furiously preparing for another round.” |JULY 29, 2011, FOREIGN POLICY

Comments (152)


Abughassan said:

We do not need a new army,we need a new regime.

July 30th, 2011, 4:58 pm

 

louai said:

‘Is the Free Syrian Army Real?’

Dear Joshua

I think the designer of the Syrian revolution is a Nigerian fraudster ,there is nothing real about this revolution ,only the country destruction is real (but not if posted by the revolutionists) ,

the motto of this revolution must be ‘fake it till you make it’ .

July 30th, 2011, 5:43 pm

 

Tara said:

I am very annoyed with the fabricated free Syrian army video. While the baby noise background does not prove anything to me, the uniforms look indeed identical and indeed would cast a doubt in my mind on any future videos/ links. While I remained proud of the Syrian revolution and our fight to achieve freedom and dignity, I am very taken back with the lies and fabrications. This in my view is a noble revolution which has been paid for by sacred Syrian blood. I very much condemn the use of lies and fabrication no matter what the intent and the cause are. I am truly saddened by this.

July 30th, 2011, 5:53 pm

 

Aboud said:

@2 *groan* Lame line is lame.

And were the defections at Abukamal faked? Ah right, the Baathists don’t like to talk about that one. Nothing must ever be allowed to pierce the bubble of fiction junior and his sycophants have trapped themselves in.

July 30th, 2011, 6:14 pm

 

Aboud said:

Must I really play the part of Captain Blindingly Obvious? Anyone who defected, and lived long enough to talk about it, most definitely dumped their uniforms first chance they got. Dunno, that’s what I’d have done if I wanted to get away. But that’s just me.

Did those officers display their military IDs? If so, then too bad, and better luck with your next conspiracy theories.

July 30th, 2011, 6:32 pm

 

MM said:

All I can say is الله أكبر

For some men, shooting at their own people is not an option in their mind. And not shooting results in death. The next logical conclusion is to fight those who are fighting you. They’ve made a noble choice.

While the center of mukhabarat is working overtime to squash dissent and have several individuals with the various handles they use on this website posting constantly, playing the psychological games that they do, I think the time has come for they – those agents to also reassess their lives. What are you doing? What are you working for? Let’s turn this black page of history called Assad.

As I have commented before, the “tree of liberty is sometimes watered by the blood of patriots.” I will not elaborate further as I was moderated the last time.

July 30th, 2011, 6:42 pm

 

Tara said:

Aboud

Elaborate further. I am not really wired for conspiracies. Yes you can call me naïve or whatever. So the defectors having dumped their uniforms for safety reasons are using the same uniform for a photo-op? I guess that is possible.

July 30th, 2011, 6:51 pm

 

louai said:

Aboudi ,
‘groan’ ! thank you for the new word ,I will add to my dictionary and use it every time I see a fabricated video uploaded from this revolution ,as return to the favour ,I will direct you to another fake video about army defection in Bab elsbaa 🙂
when the army entered the neighbourhood and people were cheering the soldiers, ,Aboudi was there filming and he uploaded to youtube as army defection !! but it was so lame and ‘blindingly obvious’ (thank you for this one as well) so it didn’t get good audience (apart of gullible Al Jazeera’s audience) ,there are some tanks and machine guns as well .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXK8b25o828

Albukamal : you did not tell us yet ,where are the soldiers in your video ! all what we saw is tow tanks and people cheering them ,no solders in uniforms nothing ..so show us the solders and then we can talk about it

July 30th, 2011, 6:53 pm

 

Aboud said:

Tara, what *idiot* would walk around in an army uniform so far away from his unit, and in all likelihood in civilian transport, unless they could prove they were on a legitimate trip.

Soldiers who broke away could be wearing Smurf uniforms for all we could care. If they show their military ID, then they are the real deal. If no ID was shown, then the video should not have been taken seriously in the first place.

I just saw what is supposed to be a video of defections in Dayr El Zour this very evening, but the quality was not good at all, so I’ll let someone else post it.

@8 Learn to take your time when writing. Don’t worry, we are not in a race, and it will prevent you from sounding so muddled next time.

“you did not tell us yet ,where are the soldiers in your video ”

You got me there. The soldiers just parked their tanks and APCs there and went out for lunch. The crowd took the chance to jump and cheer on the armored vehicles, which two weeks later still have not been returned to the army for some reason. Duh.

July 30th, 2011, 6:56 pm

 

louai said:

Dear Tara ,
The famous defector AL qah3ami , first appeared in uniform from the regular army but later when people laughed at him ,because he claimed he was from counter terrorism unit (who were black uniform) he made another video wearing the black uniform 🙂

Aboudi , unlike you I have a busy life ,I wished I was less busy to expose all this revolution fabrications ,but ,there are too much to start with .

the point is about Albukamal , the soldiers most likely were murdered by your friends or the crowds were just celebrating as the one in Babel sbaa .

July 30th, 2011, 7:01 pm

 

MNA said:

Ladies and gents,

Don’t waste your time on discussing this mute subject. 5 months on and there has not been a single proof of any defection. You know why? B/c there wasn’t and there isn’t any. In some cases you have army deserters and not defectors.

July 30th, 2011, 7:12 pm

 

Aboud said:

@10 “,because he claimed he was from counter terrorism unit (who were black uniform) ”

“Wear” black uniforms. And no, those are the Air Force Intelligence, who until this revolution were running around chasing smugglers, not “counter terrorism”. But then I shouldn’t expect too much from people who haven’t even heard of the badal. Geesh, every Syrian over the age of 18 knows the exact amount in dollars that needs to be paid. Except, apparently, the Baathists here.

“the soldiers most likely were murdered by your friends ”

Yes, of course, why didn’t that occur to me! You are an absolute genius! In half a day, the entire garrison at Abukamal was overrun, and the tanks fixed and patched up from any signs at all of having been in a battle. It makes perfect sense….in Menhebakstan, maybe.

If that was the case, why has the regime been trying to negotiate its way back in? You don’t negotiate with such a ruthless, cold blooded enemy. But you do if you know your entire garrison has defected, and the town can rely on their brethren over the Iraqi border.

Is your strategy to clutter up this forum with obviously ridiculous claims that a 10 year old can shoot down? Because that’s the only explanation I can find for how anyone can say the things you do with a straight face.

July 30th, 2011, 7:17 pm

 

Tara said:

Louai and Aboud

In all honesty it makes sense to defect. And I am surprised that there were no more defections than what we have seen already. I personally will teach my own kid if he was ever put in a situation where he is ordered to shoot on his own unarmed people or any unarmed people for that matter, of not to do it even if that means losing his own life.. And if he is ever told to kneel to anyone except God, to never do it even if it means losing his own life. I know I may sound unreal and I may be but that is how I feel at least now.

July 30th, 2011, 7:19 pm

 

beaware said:

Tough bipartisan questioning by Congress of U.S. policy on Syria

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-us-syria-20110728,0,5960400.story

Republican and Democratic members of a House panel complain that the effort to calibrate a message on Syria has failed to make it clear the U.S. stands with protesters against an oppressive regime.
By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
July 28, 2011
Reporting from Washington—

Senior State Department officials came under tough questioning from lawmakers Wednesday over the Obama administration’s reluctance to call for Syrian President Bashar Assad’s departure.

Despite the Assad government’s bloody crackdown on demonstrators, U.S. officials have shied away from calling directly for his ouster. They worry that the United States would end up looking weak if Assad managed to hang on in the face of popular pressure. And with American leverage limited in Syria, they also have been reluctant to raise expectations about what the administration might be prepared to do to unseat the regime.

At Wednesday’s hearing, an unusual coalition of Republican and Democratic members of a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee complained that the effort to carefully calibrate a message had failed to make it clear that America stands with pro-reform protesters against an oppressive regime.

“How many must die before we have the courage to stand up and say that Assad is illegitimate and he must go?” asked Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio), the subcommittee’s chairman. He noted that the death toll in Syria over the last four months was more than 1,600 demonstrators.

Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-N.Y.) accused the administration of holding off on its strongest language until it was clear that Assad would actually fall. “We’re hedging our bets here on the odd chance that he’s going to be able to hang on,” Ackerman said.

The lawmakers’ complaints again illustrated the challenge the administration has faced in trying to craft a consistent message about American intentions as pro-democracy movements have swept through the Middle East and North Africa this year.

Administration officials insisted that they have left no doubt that the U.S. deplores Assad’s brutal tactics and wants him to go. And they suggested — as administration officials have privately done in recent days — that the White House may yet deliver the definitive message that the lawmakers were demanding.

“I don’t think it’s fair to say we’re standing still and hedging our bets,” said Michael Posner, assistant secretary of State for democracy, human rights and labor, adding that the U.S. government had “absolutely lost faith” in the Syrian government.

Jeffrey Feltman, the assistant secretary of State for Near Eastern affairs, noted that when U.S. Ambassador Robert Ford visited a Syrian city in the midst of a demonstration recently, he was showered with flowers.

“People know where we stand,” Feltman said.

July 30th, 2011, 7:24 pm

 

beaware said:

Armed groups attack law-enforcement members in east Syria: report

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-07/31/c_131020085.htm

DAMASCUS, July 30 (Xinhua) — Armed groups attacked law- enforcement members and a police station in the northeastern city of Deir al-Zour and stole some weapons and ammunitions, the official SANA news agency reported late Saturday.

Armed groups cut off and barricaded some roads in the city to terrorize residents, said SANA, adding the law-enforcement members encountered these groups and exchanged gunfire with them.

It said law-enforcement members are still hunting these groups down and using the right methods in dealing with situation there, adding the residents of Deir al-Zour expressed their worries of the groups’ acts and stressed their refusal of any acts that would harm the country in general and Deir al-Zour in particular.

Meanwhile, the Syria-News, local news website, cited witnesses as saying that the city of Deir al-Zour is witnessing a proliferation of armed men and that the situation is so intense, as the water and electricity were cut off since Friday noon. It said there are large numbers of arrests in the nearby al-Bukmal city as well.

Security forces are conducting a large-scale house raids and arrests especially those whose ages range from 15 to 40, said the report, adding the families there don’t know where the detainees are taken to.

“There is a shortage of food and the families there are helping one another by exchanging what they have of food and water,” The website cited an unnamed journalist in the area as saying.

Activists said Deir al-Zour witnessed a large anti-government protest on Friday, as part of other protests that took to streets across the country, to press demands for the downfall of the leadership.

Local Coordination Committees (LCC), which tracks the protests in Syria, said the Syrian army had bombarded al-Jawza neighborhood, west of Deir al-Zour, with artilleries which left many injuries.

The city of Deir al-Zour has witnessed a large turnout since the eruption of protests more than four months ago.

Activists said the unrest in Syria has claimed the lives of more than 1,400 civilians, while the government disputed the toll, blaming the crisis on armed and extremist groups that aim to sow a sectarian rift in the country.

July 30th, 2011, 7:27 pm

 

aboali said:

defectors in Qorieh, Dier Ezzour. with military transports and weapons visible:

July 30th, 2011, 7:31 pm

 

beaware said:

Ivashov: Syria Experiencing Wide Scale Campaign Targeting Its Independent Policy and Support for Resistance

http://sana.sy/eng/337/2011/07/30/361225.htm

Jul 30, 2011

MOSCOW/BELGRADE, (SANA) – Vice President of the Academy on Geopolitical Affairs Gen. Leonid Ivashov said on Saturday that what is currently taking place in Syria is a wide scale campaign carried out by Israel’s Mossad and western countries – particularly the United States and France – in an attempt to fragment Syria due to its independent policy, support for resistance against Israel and establishing strong relations with Iran.

In an interview with SANA’s correspondent in Moscow, Ivashov said that the west is also targeting Syria because of its position in the Arab world and its unique style of development that can serve as a role model of Arab people, noting that the international financial circles that organized the campaign against Syria don’t want the Syrian model to succeed and continue its independent policy.

He pointed out that the third stage of the U.S. plan to destabilize Syria is taking place, and that this stage consists of carrying out sabotage and assassinations, causing bloodshed, and taking the situation from a political track to a combat track.

Ivashov explained that the second stage consisted of inciting armed confrontations with the army and law-enforcement forces, while the first stage involved amassing funds and weapons, carrying out a strong media misdirection campaign, and organizing armed terrorist groups.

In this context, Ivashov criticized the intense media and psychological war waged by some mass media establishments and satellite channels against Syria to cause chaos, fear and panic. He also lauded the Syrian media which is confronting the media weapons and uncovering its lies and misdirection to the public opinion.

Ivashov voiced confidence that Syria will emerge from this crisis stronger and more resilient due to the initiatives of President Bashar al-Assad, and that Syria will succeed in foiling the acts of terrorist and sabotage planned by the Mossad and western intelligence agencies.

He also condemned the acts of sabotage that targeted a passenger train between Aleppo and Damascus and an oil pipeline in Homs.

On a relevant note, Ivashov pointed out that the U.S. organized a training course in a neighboring country for Syrian opposition, providing them with instructions and directions to carry out acts of terrorism and sabotage in Syria and exploit the just demands of some Syrians, adding that the Syrian leadership began finding solutions to these demands by issuing a number of legislations and reform laws.

Resisting Pressure and Foreign Interference the Only Way Out for Syria

In an article published recently in Serbia’s Novi Standard newspaper, Ivashov said that resisting pressures and foreign interference is the only way for Syria to emerge from its current situation.

Ivashov said that Syria works with a stable foreign and internal policy, and that President Bashar al-Assad’s political strategy is based on tackling the issue of defense and security on the bases of national, social and political unity of Syrian society, creating an independent policy that doesn’t appeal to the United States and its bid for controlling the world.

He pointed out that the U.S. uses all methods to fight the countries it labels as enemies, including revolutionary technology and military force, along with international organization, in addition to using the resources of countries under U.S. and NATO influence to form clandestine units of extremists and mercenaries to fight countries that attempt to follow and independent and free policies.

Ivashov said that mass media opposed to Syria try to pass criminal acts as protests, and that the arrests of gang members are repression of political rights and liberties, with the U.S. truing to push through with a Security Council resolution to impose a blockade on Syria. However, after the experience in Libya, Russia and China thwarted these attempts.

He added that U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Nicolas Sarkozy are in a delicate situation, as they must go into elections after suffering one defeat after the other; first in Libya and now in Syria.

Ivashov concluded by saying that Syrians must either resist western pressure or end up like Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

July 30th, 2011, 7:36 pm

 

beaware said:

Rights group says 20 protesters killed across Syria

http://www.turkishweekly.net/print.asp?type=1&id=120415

Fighting erupts between military forces, residents in Deir al-Zor; several injured as forces open fire on anti-Assad demonstrators in Deraa; saboteurs target oil pipeline in Homs.

AMMAN- Syrian forces shot dead at least 20 civilians in attacks on pro-democracy demonstrations across the country on Friday, the Syrian human rights organization Sawasiah said.

Syrians in their thousands took to the streets nationwide for the 17th consecutive Friday to demand an end to President Bashar al-Assad’s 11-year rule, activists said by telephone, defying an intensifying military crackdown on an uprising for political freedoms.

“The security forces are continuing violent repression against peaceful demonstrations demanding freedom and the downfall of the regime, firing live ammunition at most protests all over Syria on Friday,” Sawasiah said in a statement sent to Reuters.

Sawasiah said it had the names of 20 people killed in the cities of Latakia, Hama, Homs, Deraa, Kiswa, Deir al-Zor and in and around the capital Damascus.

Residents said armed resistance erupted on Friday against President Bashar al-Assad’s forces in several neighborhoods of Deir al-Zor after the killing of five protesters, shot dead by Syrian security forces in a new effort to try to crush widening Sunni Muslim unrest against Assad.

Thousands took to streets across the country after Friday prayers to demand the downfall of President Bashar Assad, witnesses and activists said. Several other people were injured during the clashes.

“They are firing at demonstrators in alleyways and people are running for cover. Protesters have been trying to avoid heavy security in main streets,” a resident of Deraa, a technician who gave his name as Ayman, told Reuters by phone. Security forces also used tear gas to try to disperse demonstrators in Deraa, witnesses said.

Also on Friday, saboteurs “targeted” an oil pipeline near the central city of Homs, the official Syrian news agency said, without giving details of the nature of the attack.

Homs is home to one of Syria’s two oil refineries and has seen large protests demanding the toppling of president Bashar Assad whose forces have deployed tanks in the city.

On Sunday Assad, from Syria’s minority Alawite sect, replaced the civilian governor of Deir al-Zor province with a secret police officer, two days after the biggest pro-democracy demonstrations in the province so far in the uprising.

Arrests continued across the country in the last two days, rights campaigners said, including hundreds of people in Damascus, where they said Republican Guards deployed in force in the central Maidan district on Friday to prevent protests.

July 30th, 2011, 7:39 pm

 

MNA said:

Tara @ 13

“In all honesty it makes sense to defect. And I am surprised that there were no more defections than what we have seen already. I personally will teach my own kid if he was ever put in a situation where he is ordered to shoot on his own unarmed people or any unarmed people for that matter, of not to do it even if that means losing his own life.. And if he is ever told to kneel to anyone except God, to never do it even if it means losing his own life. I know I may sound unreal and I may be but that is how I feel at least now.”

Tara

You are right 100% and I believe most people including those in the army believe in what you stated above, and some how you answered your own question to why hasn’t been more defections.

The reason is b/c the army, for the most part, has not been involved in any indiscriminate killing of unarmed civilians.

I second AbuGhassan, we have to be very careful about delegitimizing the army. It is the only safety net that Syria will have in any event or outcome.

July 30th, 2011, 8:07 pm

 

Dale Andersen said:

The Syrian Army is not to be trusted. For the past 40 years, it has been the willing instrument of the Assad Mafia. After Bashar is gone, many senior Army commanders will have much to answer for.

As for the soldiers, they now have another Syrian Army to join. A real army, not a tool of a mafia.

July 30th, 2011, 8:35 pm

 

syau said:

The ‘Free Syrian Army’ is nothing but another fabrication by the Syrian revolution 2011 that has been exposed.

On the report from channel 4 news, at minute 2:13, the reporter interviews a so called female activist described as 21 year old Zayda, who claims she was tortured by police. She continues on to claim she was arrested and jailed for five days, beaten, humiliated and tortured. The reporter is then shown footage of her ‘arrest’. This is the same female that had made a number of fabricated clips where she is apparently protesting and is arrested by mukhabarat, who, as she, were the same people in the previous clips.

The reporter was duped. Had he done his homework prior to interviewing her, he would have found a number of similar videos with ‘Zayda’ and her partners in the fabricated videos.

Tara’s right, it doesn’t make sense to defect. I very highly doubt any of the defection claims are actually legitimate.
A video has surfaced, which was taken prior to the massacre of the security personnel in Jisr Alshughour. It was taken by one of the martyred officers on the rooftop, before they were murdered. They had a golden opportunity to ‘defect’right then and there. It would have been very easy for the soldiers to surrender to their killers and announce that they will stand with the revolution, therefore, saving their lives, but they didn’t. They were shoulder to shoulder, side by side, saying they are Assad’s men (rjal Al Assad) in the face of their imminent murders and mutilations. I’ll link it. but it’s quite graphic towards the end.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVtHk3wozGQ&feature=channel_video_title

The Syrian army stands united with President Assad. They will not defect and they will continue fighting the armed elements in this revolution and protect the country and its people from their malicious acts, and, the memory of the murdered soldiers in Jisr Alshughour will not be forgotten while they are fighting the terrorists of this revolution, the terrorist revolution that robbed the country of 120 of its security personnel during one hateful massacre.

July 30th, 2011, 8:43 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Chanel 4report:
Manal is مناضله مشخلعه :سيكاره وقطه ونصف ستيان
What more freedom she wants?0%ستيان or may be a sigar
شي مسخره

July 30th, 2011, 9:11 pm

 

Tara said:

Syau,

See aboali post # 16. Looks very real to me.

July 30th, 2011, 9:29 pm

 

Revlon said:

Dear Joshua, the claim made by SNN that the group of the seven officers of the FSA are fake is like all regime media claims; surreal.
The arguments driven had to do with uniform and a baby cying in the background.

First, the original video of Officer Hijazi had a metallic noise in the background. It was not a baby crying.

Second, the baby babbling sound in Officer AlAs3ad is a clear dubbing on the original one. The baby babble sound was even higher than the Officer’s. Had it been recorded in a house as claimed, the interview could have easily been done in a different quiet room.

Third, the uniform! Nothing new here. This argument was used against the first defecting soldier AlQash3ami in March!

Here are my arguments to those who doubt the genuine claim of these officers:
First:
None of the General commander of the army (Jr), the defense minister, or chief of staff of the army have issued a statement denying the true membership of any of the scores of YouTubed defectors, including As3ad and company in the Syrian Army.

Second:
The officers who have founded thye FSA are not kids. They are grown ups. They are presenting their real names, units, and numbers that can be easily checked by authorities.

Commenters on this forum have a choice to believe the stories of either:
Grown up Officers risking their lives in seeking to defend their civilian countrymen,

or

Pubescent narcissistic politician Jr, his serial muderer brother, and mafioso cousin.

July 30th, 2011, 9:38 pm

 

ss said:

The opposition is running out of fuel. They are going crazy and trying to do something hoping it may turn the course. They started to realize that their time is running, and if they cant bring the regime down, they are rest assured that it is gone for another 40 years. They know that this is their last chance and they know that by doing nothing they are in big loss. The revolution has no support internationally. USA, UK, and France barely condemning Syria. I think the international community in agreement that what is going on in Syria is a terrorist act. 5 months pssed and the opposition repeating the same words, the media making more fabricated videos, aljazeera getting slammed left and right. The opposition ship is sinking, sinking, and sinking.

July 30th, 2011, 9:40 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Any one who is hoping that the Syrian army will be divided is practically hoping for Libyan style Syria,which will be a disaster.historically,in similar situations,it is always anticipated to have isolated incidents.you can’t support detections abd claim to be a pro-united Syria,because that is contradiction.if the sectarian virus invades the army,we are going into libanese style gurella war.
So hands off the army,or your hands will be off.

July 30th, 2011, 9:42 pm

 

Ya Mara Ghalba said:

The Syrian Establishment is going to remain politically a one-party Establishment: there are no disagreements within the Syrian Establishment on any major policy issue.

As recently as four months ago many pro-regime Syrians thought that retaining Article 8 of the Constitution would be okay. Today, with hindsight, pro-regime Syrians are unanimous that Article 8 should be repealed and that it was a mistake to have not repealed it earlier. Acknowledging that mistake in no way hinders anyone from supporting the regime. At the Syrian National Dialog Meeting, 12 July 2011: “Some participants characterized the recent crisis in Syria as caused by a compound between a conspiracy and the government’s mistakes of the past. Participants also called for not wasting time on discussing the mistakes of the past and focusing on the future….” http://www.sana.sy/eng/337/2011/07/12/357937.htm

One problem I have with this blog is that it doesn’t admit, or deny, or entertain, the idea that there is such a thing as “the Syrian Establishment”. So when I say “there are no disagreements within the Syrian Establishment on any major policy issue”, that statement must be read by at least some people as a nonsense statement, or as a controversial or very presumptuous statement. I don’t demonstrate that a Syrian Establishment exists, nor what its features are, because it would take pages and pages to do it. This blog, with its focus on dissident activities, leaves readers blind as to the Establishment’s sociological extensiveness (most important), and the Establishment’s moral values and spirit. Western information sources are the foundation, and the bulk of the content, of this blog. That is why this blog is assuredly very bad on the whole. Its resulting blindness means it’d be more productive for everybody who wants to understand Syria — including the already knowledgeable HSYRIAN | HS — to be at a blog whose foundation is Syrian information sources. There are several such blogs. Their foundation is that they mostly duplicate what’s put out by SANA. Which is inadequate of course. But it’s a good start.

Here’s a piece of information from a Syrian source: “It is a great honor to raise the flag of my sacred homeland in gratitude of all it has offered us,” said engineer Amal Abu al-Izz in a pro-regime rally in Sweida, 20 July (SANA). From innumerable bits of information like that, it’s clear to me that most Syrians love Syria. It is equally clear that the Syrians who love Syria are never going to buy into the negativity of the political dissidents (no matter which species of dissidents). Joshua says: “Without dealing honestly with the failings of Middle Eastern nation states and societies, solutions … will be elusive.” Politically speaking, that sort of attitude is dead on arrival in Syria because of its negativity. (Comparable criticisms aimed at the broad society are also dead on arrival in most of the West too, as is well-known, as Western electorates always prefer positive, constructive themes).

Joshua’s full sentence is: “Without dealing honestly with the failings of Middle Eastern nation states and societies, solutions to dictatorship will be elusive.” If a free and fair election were held in Syria today the Assad government would be elected by a landslide. The government has achieved that wonderful feat in no small part by finding out what Syrians want. Therefore Syria does not have a “dictatorship” problem. Syria is fine.

July 30th, 2011, 10:13 pm

 

Ya Mara Ghalba said:

The Syrian Establishment is going to remain politically a one-party Establishment: there are no disagreements within the Syrian Establishment on any major policy issue.

As recently as four months ago many pro-regime Syrians thought that retaining Article 8 of the Constitution would be okay. Today, with hindsight, pro-regime Syrians are unanimous that Article 8 should be repealed and that it was a mistake to have not repealed it earlier. Acknowledging that mistake in no way hinders anyone from supporting the regime. At the Syrian National Dialog Meeting, 12 July 2011: “Some participants characterized the recent crisis in Syria as caused by a compound between a conspiracy and the government’s mistakes of the past. Participants also called for not wasting time on discussing the mistakes of the past and focusing on the future….” http://www.sana.sy/eng/337/2011/07/12/357937.htm

One problem I have with this blog is that it doesn’t admit, or deny, or entertain, the idea that there is such a thing as “the Syrian Establishment”. So when I say “there are no disagreements within the Syrian Establishment on any major policy issue”, that statement must be read by at least some people as a nonsense statement, or as a controversial or very presumptuous statement. I don’t demonstrate that a Syrian Establishment exists, nor what its features are, because it would take pages and pages to do it. This blog, with its focus on dissident activities, leaves readers blind as to the Establishment’s sociological extensiveness (most important), and the Establishment’s moral values and spirit. Western information sources are the foundation and the bulk of the content of this blog. That is why the blog is assuredly very bad on the whole. Its resulting blindness means it’d be more productive for everybody who wants to understand Syria — including the already knowledgeable HSYRIAN | HS — to be at a blog whose foundation is Syrian information sources. There are several such blogs. Their foundation is that they mostly duplicate what’s put out by SANA. Which is inadequate of course. But it’s a good start.

Here’s a piece of information from a Syrian source: “It is a great honor to raise the flag of my sacred homeland in gratitude of all it has offered us,” said engineer Amal Abu al-Izz in a pro-regime rally in Sweida, 20 July (SANA). From innumerable bits of information like that, it’s clear to me that most Syrians love Syria. Here’s a lovely example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJrRY8SkoQY#t=92s. It is equally clear that the Syrians who love Syria are never going to buy into the negativity of the political dissidents (no matter which species of dissidents). Joshua says: “Without dealing honestly with the failings of Middle Eastern nation states and societies, solutions … will be elusive.” Politically speaking, that sort of attitude is dead on arrival in Syria because of its negativity. (Comparable criticisms aimed at the broad society are also dead on arrival in most of the West too, as is well-known, as Western electorates always prefer positive, constructive themes).

Joshua’s full sentence is: “Without dealing honestly with the failings of Middle Eastern nation states and societies, solutions to dictatorship will be elusive.” If a free and fair election were held today the Assad government would be elected by a landslide. The government has achieved that wonderful feat in no small part by finding out what Syrians want. Therefore Syria does not have a “dictatorship” problem. Syria is fine.

July 30th, 2011, 10:17 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Dear Joshua
Just to support Revlon statement ,this army offers free baby sitting services,in case you were interested.
In the future any Revlon vidio ,forward to Aljazera.

July 30th, 2011, 10:19 pm

 

Tara said:

I think regime supporters are running out of arguments. First, they told us it is a US conspiracy. Now, they say the USA is barely condemning the regime. Then, they told us, the demonstrators are all MB followers, and now they critique female demonstrators of wearing revealing cloth. Someone told me here that important people in Syria read this blog. Sooo, to the important people in Syria:

Please recall all your supporters. Please send them to Turkey for training class. You can have it in the same town where the youth activists are holding their training sessions. Please train them to come up with a new plausible conspiracy theory as they appear a bit confused issuing contradictory statements that are weakening their stand.

July 30th, 2011, 10:22 pm

 

Ya Mara Ghalba said:

Ramadan, “when every day is a Friday”, starts on 1 August. In a speech on 21 July the Syrian Government Minister for Religious Endowments said “the heavenly religions do not call for division and hatred, but they are force for love and peace.” He said mosques are places for call to goodness, and not for gathering of saboteurs.

Over the past few months, the “overwhelming majority” of practising Muslims went home from the mosques on Fridays without accepting the invitation to join the protests against the regime. I looked for a reliable statistic about the percentage of Syrian adult males who go to a mosque on Friday. I didn’t find it. In the Christian countries, it is ridiculously unreliable to seek a statistic about church attendance by polling people about how often they attend. That’s because Christians intentionally exaggerate and unintentionally overestimate how often they attend, fooling the statistics collectors and themselves in a major way (ref). I don’t know if that’s also true for Syrian Muslims (and I wouldn’t be surprised if no one else knows either). In a survey questionnaire result I saw on the Internet for Jordan, about 75 percent of Jordanian males said they regularly attended prayers at a mosque on Fridays — I decline to believe it — it seems too high. From what impressionistic information I could find, I feel it’s very safe to believe that at least twenty percent of Syrian adult males attend Friday mosque prayers. Which means that the percentage in attendance at Friday mosques is at least 20 times higher than the percentage in attendance at Friday anti-regime demonstrations, and the actual figure might be over 40 times higher. The great preponderance of non-dissidents among the mosque attendees means that the mosques are effectively pro-Establishment social environments. The Minister for Religious Endowments can relax.

July 30th, 2011, 10:28 pm

 

ss said:

Coment 29.

Example of an angy opposition fellow who is running out of fuel. The opposition people are realizing their fate and the dismal future ahead of them

July 30th, 2011, 10:31 pm

 

Norman said:

Tara,

The US administration is taking it’s clues from Syria comment and they are in as much limbo as we are , ah rd to know sometimes what is going on.

July 30th, 2011, 10:34 pm

 

Tara said:

# 31

When people have no argument to make, they resort to subjective descriptions, a well known And tried tactic to Mnhebaks. It simply does not work. Argue the point. The fate of this beloved regime will be a re-run of history.

July 30th, 2011, 10:36 pm

 

Tara said:

Hey Norman

How are you?

July 30th, 2011, 10:40 pm

 

Mick said:

Revlon,

Is the video fake? Depends on what you mean.

Are there military members that have family ties that overcome the military ties? Yes. So far, the number is at the .01% rate. Not anything one would call a problem four months into a supposed massive social uprising where troops are ordered to blindly shoot into crowds.

Are there members of the Idlib/Jisr Ash Shaghur/Ar Rastan crowd in Turkey, including a few military family members, making videos for propaganda? Yes. This does not equate to a split in the military. Senior military leaders are not about to coup against the regime. When you see military leaders argue, like you have in Turkey, that is a serious problem. A few medium ranking officers from small towns making a video in a foreign country is not a threat to the regime.

Do these forces represent a military force? No. Just juicy video meat for people sitting in a bathtub to talk about.

I see the false claim that the 4th div was involved in every military operation has suddenly dropped from the opposition’s lies. So now it the ‘security forces’ and ‘shabiha’ forces that are to blame.

Tara,

Would the military still be together if they were either ordered to, or forced to watch, blatant killing of their own civilians? You answer your question by asking it. And if you bothered to read the news, you would find that quite a lot of soldiers were shot. So many that there is no way the force would still be together if they were all shot by their own troops for not obeying orders to shoot. We are talking hundreds dead and thousands wounded. Not half a dozen folks from towns that had no problem slaughtering 120 people.

July 30th, 2011, 10:49 pm

 

Norman said:

Tara,

I am OK, Thanks for asking, how do you think what is going in Syria will end up or should end up.

July 30th, 2011, 10:50 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

29.tara
بذمتك هادا منظر وحده مناضله او وحده رفيقة نضال معك
او وحده بتحترم حالا.يعني بالشام كلا مافي ثورجيه غير هامشخلعه
والتانيه ام النظارات السود.يعني بدك تبعتينا عتركيا مشانهيك والله حرام

July 30th, 2011, 10:50 pm

 

beaware said:

Iraqi government is partner is Syrian bloodshed
http://www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=2&id=26075
30/07/2011
By Tariq Alhomayed

On the eve of the Friday of “your silence is killing us” protests in Syria, the Iraqi government signed a number of agreements with the Syrian regime in the capital Baghdad. These agreements were signed in the blood of the Syrian victims who have been facing continued suppression since the beginning of their peaceful uprising.

At the same time that the Syrian people are telling the Arabs that “your silence is killing us”, Nouri al-Maliki’s government is providing support for the Bashar al-Assad regime, clearly disregarding the blood of the unarmed Syrians. This means that Nouri al-Maliki, the prime minister of Iraq, has publicly added himself to the list of the friends of the Syrian regime, which also includes Hezbollah and Iran. Of course, Iraqi interests, at all levels, do not require the Nouri al-Maliki government to support the al-Assad regime in this manner, so we cannot say that Baghdad is acting realistically in this regard, or is serving its own priorities. The new Iraqi regime was supposed to be the spearhead of the democratic process in our region, according to what the Americans were saying, and what has been repeated by the [political] symbols in Iraq today, however what we are seeing is unfortunately the complete opposite of this.
For Iraq today, and particularly the current Iraqi government, is a purely sectarian regime. It was the current Iraqi regime that raised its voice in defense of Bahrain’s Shiite community, and denounced the Gulf rulers, and made a huge fuss in this regard. Whilst its allies are the ones who incited its supporters to take to the street in Iraqi cities to denounce the Kingdom of Bahrain, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the GCC Peninsula Shield Force. However today, it seems that the Baghdad regime now think that the right to demand freedom is too much for the Syrian people, despite all the blood that has been shed in Syria by the Damascus regime. Therefore the Baghdad regime decided to support its Syrian counterpart for purely sectarian reasons; how can this not be the case when the only allies of the Bashar al-Assad regime today in our region are Tehran, Baghdad, and Hezbollah-controlled Lebanon. Could there be a greater example of sectarianism than this?

The Nouri al-Maliki government signed these agreements with the Bashar al-Assad regime at the same time that the rest of the world is cutting its [diplomatic] ties with Damascus and imposing sanctions on the al-Assad regime, and at the same time that the Syrian people are calling on the Arabs to stand with them in this unprecedented situation. All that the Syrian people are demanding is freedom and dignity, for is it reasonable for any state to act in this manner [and suppress its own people], particularly when that state claims to respect international conventions, democracy, and human rights? Unfortunately, it seems that our region has moved away from stability and respecting human rights, and we have returned to square one, where states and politicians are ruled by a sectarian logic, rather than the logic of development. For if we believe that Hezbollah, by supporting the Syrian regime, is acting with the logic of a militia that is loyal to Iran and is carrying out Iran’s agenda in the region, then what can we say about the Iraqi government which claims to be democratic but supports a regime that is brutally and violently suppressing its own people?

As we have repeatedly stated, one of the advantages of the political earthquake that is reverberating across our region today is that this has brought an end to the era of false slogans, including “the resistance”, “democracy”, “Arabism” and others. This earthquake has not just exposed individuals and groups, but also states, including the Iraqi government. Therefore all the cards have now been exposed, and we can see Iran and its followers in Iraq and Lebanon openly standing with the al-Assad regime that is brutally repressing its own people; this is all part of a blatant equation, namely Shiite vs. Sunni. So what will the Arabs do today? What will the influential [Arabs], and even those Arabs who have been targeted by this exposed sectarian tripartite alliance do now? Or do you still doubt this?

July 30th, 2011, 11:21 pm

 

Tara said:

Norman,

There is no come back.  I am sure every Syrian knows that.  How should it end?  Bashar needs to declare a timetable of 6 to 18 months after which free election should be held where he will not run again.  This will give enough time for a political process to take place and will avert a “civil war”.  He must anounce he is not running again otherwise, he would not be believed.

How do I think it is going to end up is different.  Basahr is a dictator and has a dictator psychology.  Watch the link Josh posted yesterday about the Arab Awakening.  It gives you a glimpse into the psychology of a dictator.  Dictators think they are the only ones who can take their country forward.  They lose touch with reality from political standpoint.  Bashar will not proceed with real reforms.  What happen is, demonstrations will continue and will become more widespread.  People will demonstrate every Friday and also during weeknights whenever they have a chance.  They are not phased by the arrest and the killings anymore.  It becomes an enjoyable act for them.  It just feels good.  The regime on the other hand will be exhausted on the long range.  The regime can’t handle a long protracted dissent where massive amount of security forces, shabbiha and the army are constantly deployed.  It then may disintegrate from within.. And Besho will fall.

     

July 30th, 2011, 11:24 pm

 

louai said:

Lets keep ignoring them , lets ignore they were ever existed , lets ignore their families and children ,
We came to time that we only count our martyrs as numbers ,names are not important any more ,any one who keep telling us that there are no armed terrorists ,what do you tell yourself when you hear such news? At least admit and condemn the terror ,let us no partner the killer with our silence .

Five Martyrs Escorted to Final Resting Place

Jul 31, 2011

DAMASCUS, DEIR EZZOR, (SANA)- Five members of the army and the security forces on Saturday were escorted from Tishreen Military Hospital in Damascus and the Military Hospital in Deir Ezzor to their final resting place in their villages and hometowns after they were targeted by armed terrorist groups in Deir Ezzor and Damascus Countryside.

Solemn processions were held for the martyrs as they were carried up on shoulders while the Military Band was playing the music of the “Martyr” and the “Farewell.”

The martyrs are:

– Volunteer Sergeant Major, Mohammad Jawdat Abdullah from Hama.

– Volunteer Corporal, Ismail Jara’atli from Homs.

– Conscript Corporal, Hashim Yusuf Mohana from Lattakia.

– Private, Majed Mohsen Hassan from Hama.

– Conscript, Hamed Hamid al-Zagh from Idleb.

Suleiman Jara’atli, brother of martyr Ismail, expressed pride in his brother’s martyrdom who sacrificed his soul for the sake of preserving the security and stability of the motherland.

R. al-Jazaeri

http://www.sana.sy/eng/337/2011/07/31/361273.htm

July 30th, 2011, 11:34 pm

 

Tara said:

Kandahar,

Come on now. Syria is diversified and that is why it has its own distinctive taste. From the niqab to the bikini. Underneath the surface is what matters. I can see underneath the surface and I am sure lots of people can too. And honestly, I would be honored if I can measure up. She is the real hero. I am nothing.

And what is wrong with Turkey? We will ask the important people to have the training session for supporters in a first class hotel on the beach. You may run into Angelina and Brad.

July 30th, 2011, 11:39 pm

 

ss said:

Comment 39 by Tara,

The regime, its supporters, and the majority of honest opposition do not want the road you and your criminals are drawing to Syria. Your thugs of MBs have no role in determining the fate of 98% of the Syrian people. Of course you will come out and say that the majority of Syrians are afraid. This is typical opposition defense. Same boaring logic. 5 months passed abd your boaring plans going no where. I heard your argument before but I am sorry to say: It is not working. It looks that the world is not supporting you either, they were at first, but it seems that they realized how empty the opposition is and they simply cannot gamble with you guys. So the future of Syria will be determined after your opposition, i.e. the terrorist criminal alah wa akbar people are crushed, the order is restored, every syrian person must feel in peace, then the honest opposition will determine along with the goverment the next phase of transition. Until then there should be no discussion with terrorists and corrupt people who wants to drive the country into hell, you tried, but you failed so far. I see no signs of success on your part.

July 30th, 2011, 11:48 pm

 

beaware said:

Syria army deploys in restive eastern oil hub
(AFP)
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?col=&section=middleeast&xfile=data/middleeast/2011/July/middleeast_July629.xml
30 July 2011, 11:26 PM
DAMASCUS – Syrian troops shot dead three people who stoned a massive military convoy Saturday as it headed to quash growing anti-regime dissent in the eastern oil hub of Deir Ezzor, an activist said.

Meanwhile a man identifying himself as a Syrian army colonel told AFP in Nicosia that he had defected and has “hundreds” of troops under his command ready to confront the regular army in Deir Ezzor.
…..

Riad al-Asaad, who identified himself as a colonel who defected from the Syrian army, warned authorities against carrying out any operation in Deir Ezzor.

“I warn the Syrian authorities that I will send my troops to fight with the (regular) army if they do not stop the operations in Deir Ezzor,” Al-Asaad said.

“I am the commander of the Syrian Free Army,” he said, adding that he commanded “hundreds” of troops and was calling from inside Syria “near the Turkish border.” The claim could not be independently verified.

Meanwhile an opposition figure who declined to be named told AFP that 15 conscripts broke ranks from the troops who entered the city on Saturday and fled. “They have sought protection with residents,” the source said.
…….

July 30th, 2011, 11:53 pm

 

ss said:

“The regime on the other hand will be exhausted on the long range. The regime can’t handle a long protracted dissent where massive amount of security forces, shabbiha and the army are constantly deployed”.

LOL……As far as I can tell only branch 4 of the army has been deployed. There are many lines of defense and the structure is much more complex. The regime has a plan and specific one of taking radicals, terrorists, armed gangs, alah wa akbar gangs from the streets similar to the US war against terror. I thing they both share the same objectives. The regime sent special forces to take care of that. The army has many branches, the security has many branches, and the system is so strong and well built. I would say good for you the new army of 7 soldiers, this is what going to save you.

July 31st, 2011, 12:00 am

 

louai said:

“I warn the Syrian authorities that I will send my troops to fight with the (regular) army if they do not stop the operations in Deir Ezzor,” Al-Asaad said.’

so as i thought, they know that they can not control nor hide the armed terrorists in Deir Ezzor ,that’s why this video above was needed ,to blame all the killings they intend to do and doing on supposed army defectors , nothing new ,thye did the same in every single city the army entered so far .its not working

July 31st, 2011, 12:02 am

 

Tara said:

SS,

I thought he won 99.8 percent… Now it is 98 percent? He lost 1.8 percent? I feel too bad for Besho.

I told you before, your statements are similar to “religious convictions” and I have no interest in arguing religious convictions. You may try someone else but Tara has no interest. Tara prefers people whose minds are not enslaved.

July 31st, 2011, 12:03 am

 

NK said:

Syria no kandahar

احترنا يا أقرع من وين بدنا نمشطك
If the women were veiled they are Talibani terrorists, but when you see one in a tank top you suddenly turn into Arour!.

I know a good psychiatrist for (DID), give it a thought.

July 31st, 2011, 12:23 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

DairAlzoor is totaly different game,it is almost syria falluja,dealing with disorder in that part of the country is very challenging :
-Ther should be No Killing,period.this is very very tribal area,and one dead person will light up all the tribe.
-A lot of Syrian army soldiers are from Alder.
-Tribes extend beyond the providence and the border which can have implications.
-if order is lost in that part of the country,you will for sure see Iraq style civil war,which will be vee ugly.
-it is so astonishing to see Islamic uprising in dairalzor,it seems that Islam is the exit and the fashion all over the middle east.20 years ago these tribes were never like that,this phenomena is worth full evaluation .
-Any movement in that part of the country is being wached very carefully by the Kurds,the Kurds in Syria will be the king or the prs maker in any future deals,they will be tipping off any other balances.They are not a fan of Turkey,and that is a big reason why they are staying on the fence.Kurds has lost trust in MB because they are acting like Turkey’s puppet.Kurds will not stay quiet if they see that the situation in DairAlzoor is going to be against ther interests.from a point of view :the enemy of my enemy is my friend,Kurds and Assad has unofficial alliance .
-The weather is a major factor this time of the year in that part,with temp around 45 going on with this is not going to be a walk in the park fir any one.

July 31st, 2011, 12:37 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

NK
مقبوله وحلوه
بس والله عيب فلتانات يكونو ثورجيه
الاخوان احسن

July 31st, 2011, 12:44 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Does anyone has sure informations about the percentage of the syrian army,as far as Al Asha-er,Tribal, I was told it is 25% , is it true?.
I believe sending 80 military vehcle to Dayr Al Zore,is too high, if it is true,then expect more defection,and it will be the turning point against the regime, As I said, you make mistake, you loose.
Turkey was quiet, but it turns out,they have major military shuffle there.
The Video of Free Syrian Army is true ,and not fake,but defectors are powerless once they defect.

July 31st, 2011, 12:57 am

 

Abughassan said:

Libya’s conflict is going in a direction that does not suit advocates of a military solution. France and England,the main forces behind that solution,are about to accept a face-saving exit that may not please hardliners inside and outside Libya . The assassination of the opposition army chief by members of that opposition is raising eyebrows in the west . More evidence that internal conflicts require internal solutions,and more evidence that violence does not solve political conflicts . Watch and learn..

July 31st, 2011, 1:16 am

 

louai said:

Aboudi @10

Summery :
1-spelling correction (were to wear ) thank you .
2- ‘And no, those are the Air Force Intelligence, who until this revolution were running around chasing smugglers, not “counter terrorism”.’

I was talking about al qash3ami ,who said the army give him the black uniform, he said he joined the protestors on the spot ‘wearing’ the black uniform , and later appeared in a special forces uniform ,when people spotted that ,he wore the black uniform back.

3-‘But then I shouldn’t expect too much from people who haven’t even heard of the badal. Geesh, every Syrian over the age of 18 knows the exact amount in dollars that needs to be paid. Except, apparently, the Baathists here.’
Well I am not from this group, i did my military service ,so I qualify to belong to the second group you mentioned earlier ‘the one who did his military and knows a high rank officer close to bashar’  ,
4-‘If that was the case, why has the regime been trying to negotiate its way back in? You don’t negotiate with such a ruthless, cold blooded enemy. But you do if you know your entire garrison has defected, and the town can rely on their brethren over the Iraqi border.’
Why we didn’t hear anything from albukamal free army? Who is the leader? How many people defected? Why we didn’t see any videos or statements, not even a fabricated ones, share with us if you have any .
The last part of your post is a pathetic attempt to insult, but I don’t get offended of your insults, I see you as Aboudi ,the spoiled boy who get paid or just volunteered to pretend he never been to the west ,and lives in Homs,and learned English from watching MBC4 without subtitles, but till now we didn’t hear from you a single word describing one of the demonstrations you attended, or at least you observed ,plus you comment in SC on the demonstrations peak time , to me , that is ‘questionable’, as you like to say .

July 31st, 2011, 1:22 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Louai
لاتضيع وقتك مع عبودي هوي عرفان حالو انو عم يكزب وعرفان انو نحنا عرفانين انو هوي عم يكزب بس الجنون فنون.ازا جشوا خلا هيك تشكيلات هون مابيضل عندو غير عبودي بيصيح:هوهوهو . بيجاوبو ابو عمر :هاهاها.وبيرد عليون ابو علي :هوهوهو. بيصير اسما :عصفوريه كمنت بدال سيريا كمنت. وعند اللزوم بيجي شيخنا ريفلون وبيقرا الفاتحه عليا ويمكن يغير اسما لشريعه كمنت.

July 31st, 2011, 1:57 am

 

Real Syrian said:

Majedkhaldoon
Get up of your hallucinations about the Syrian army….. Syrian army is united and strong…. I advice you again to concentrate more on psychiatry……Hama and all Syrian cities will be cleaned from the MB and Alqaieda militia….. I feel bad for you as you believe the hallucinations which you have been living for 15 years.

July 31st, 2011, 2:43 am

 

Louai said:

SNK

سوريا مو قندهار

انا كل اللي بيهمني انو مايمرق كذباتو كانهم ثقافة عامة وانو مافي تنين بيختلفو عليهون

قال حبل الكذب قصير ,صرلنا عم نلف بهال حبل من اذار وماكان يخلص ..انا مابيهمني الواحد شو ماكان اعتقادوا او قناعتوا وبحب احكي مع المعارض قبل الموالي ….بس الكذب بيفلقني

كان صيت الحماصني الهضمنة والجنان ,,,غيرولنا ياه الأكابر للكذب والأرهاب

July 31st, 2011, 3:28 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

-in my neighborhood, lives 2 retired military men. both held high positions when they served the asads. one of them had his son recently conscripted, so he pulled a few strings and had him serve himself, bottom line: his son is spending his military duty being a chauffeur to his father. the other guy held a much higher position so he got around 4 conscripts working for him. they run around doing errands for him. both men had their conscripts usurp the parking spots in the neighbor hood. the former reserved 4 parking spots for him self while the latter took 6 parking spots.
-my teacher in high school spent his whole military service tutoring his superior’s kids.
all Syrians acknowledge that military duty is waste of time and not a beneficial experience. ( i don’t know anyone who served in the fourth regiment). while your supposed to be disciplined, toughened up and taught for war, your humiliated and forced to do pathetic errands for your superiors. this is mainly due to poor administration, corruption and cronyism. the syrian army is a far call from the IOF( Israeli offensive forces) the so called “potential target”.

July 31st, 2011, 4:02 am

 

MNA said:

Tara @ 39
Your first solution:
“There is no come back. I am sure every Syrian knows that. How should it end? Bashar needs to declare a timetable of 6 to 18 months after which free election should be held where he will not run again. This will give enough time for a political process to take place and will avert a “civil war”. He must anounce he is not running again otherwise, he would not be believed.”

Two questions:
1- We all know that Bashar Assad has support in Syria. Hardcore supporterss might say 90 or 80% while hardcore anti will say 10%. The reality, and I stand corrected, would probably say 30-40% support. Now, 30-40% support in any mutli-party system and free election is a sizable block of constituents that you can’t ignore and ignoring it in a very fragile political environment would create enormous problems. So, what kind of precedent would you be setting by banning this sizable block of voters’ main candidate, and how would you deal with the consequences?
2- Even if Bashar Assad did just what you proposed,
A- Do you think that he would be allowed to do so by the hardcore pillars of the regime? And if he insists and go ahead with your plan, how do you think the different elements of the army, security and the party would react?
B- Do you think that there would be a consensus among the various regime pillars on a one person that would represent their interest? And if not, what would happen?

Your Second solution:
“Bashar will not proceed with real reforms. What happen is, demonstrations will continue and will become more widespread. People will demonstrate every Friday and also during weeknights whenever they have a chance. They are not phased by the arrest and the killings anymore. It becomes an enjoyable act for them. It just feels good. The regime on the other hand will be exhausted on the long range. The regime can’t handle a long protracted dissent where massive amount of security forces, shabbiha and the army are constantly deployed. It then may disintegrate from within.. And Besho will fall.”

Two Question:
1- Do you think that the regime is not aware of this scenario and will just sit and watch till this moment comes?
2- And if it does come true, what would be the consequences on Syria if its army and state disintegrate?

SS @ 42

“Your thugs of MBs have no role in determining the fate of 98% of the Syrian people.”

1- Why are you so much worried if 98% of Syrians are against the MB?

“So the future of Syria will be determined after your opposition, i.e. the terrorist criminal alah wa akbar people are crushed, the order is restored, every syrian person must feel in peace,”

2- But hasn’t this been the strategy of the regime all along? And isn’t this strategy responsible for growing the demonstrations from few hundred in Dar3a to few hundred thousand nationwide? And can the regime and the country afford the consequences of this solution alone?

July 31st, 2011, 4:17 am

 

Aboud said:

“plus you comment in SC on the demonstrations peak time , to me , that is ‘questionable’, as you like to say . ”

ROFL!!!!!!!!!!

HAHAHAHAHHAHAH!

“Peak demonstration” time ya ghabi is between 12pm and 5pm Syria time. Go ahead, show me one post when I’ve posted at that time. Seriously, the things you don’t know about Syria could fill a library.

And you’d like me to tell you about the demonstrations I’ve been a part of and seen? Why don’t I just post you my phone number as well?

I like the fact that some posts between the menhebaks are nothing more than whines about me. It almost makes me feel as prominent as Ar’or. I must be doing something right.

Of course, No Klue has completely given up on any semblance of debate and is satisfied with playing the role of Klass Klown. It’s a phase most people grew out of by the time they left school 🙂

“all Syrians acknowledge that military duty is waste of time and not a beneficial experience. ( i don’t know anyone who served in the fourth regiment). while your supposed to be disciplined, toughened up and taught for war, your humiliated and forced to do pathetic errands for your superiors. this is mainly due to poor administration, corruption and cronyism. the syrian army is a far call from the IOF( Israeli offensive forces) the so called “potential target”. ”

Indeed, I have a friend who went to the army a couple of months ago. He has to pay the officer two hundred liras to talk to his family for three minutes on the officer’s mobile phone.

As every day goes by, as the government shows its ineptitude in dealing with this supposed “armed insurrection”, you realize more and more why it kept the Golan so quite all these decades. As a modern fighting force, the Baathists have left the army woefully unprepared.

But seriously, I’m still shocked not one of the Baathists here had even heard of the badal, or knew how much it was.

There have been defections aplenty in Homs for months now. Not every defector feels the need to a video, they just don’t want to be put in a position where they have to kill unarmed civilians.

But it is very telling how worked up the menhebaks have gotten over this particular video, it’s generated much more yappings from them than any other.

July 31st, 2011, 4:33 am

 

Revlon said:

Asad army invaded Hama city this morning.

A friend told me over the phone that tens of bodies have been received by various hospitals.
Many were sniped dead in the eye.

The operation aims at terrorising Hama people and the Syrian people as whole.

Mr Ford, and the world have been witnesses to the peaceful uprising in Hama city.

Leaders of the free world have moral obligation to intervene to stop the carnage.

July 31st, 2011, 4:39 am

 

NK said:

45 killed as Syrian army attacks Hama: activist
(AFP) – 53 minutes ago

NICOSIA — At least 45 people have been killed after the army launched an attack on the flashpoint protest city of Hama in central Syria, a human rights activist has said.

“The army and security forces entered Hama this morning and opened fire on civilians, killing 45 and wounding several more,” Rami Abdel Rahman of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said by telephone.

Elsewhere, “six people were killed and 50 wounded by security forces in the eastern city of Deir Ezzor and three were killed and dozens wounded at Harak in the southern Deraa region,” he said.

Since anti-regime protests erupted in Syria in mid-March, the crackdown on dissent has resulted in the deaths of more than 1,500 civilians and more than 360 members of the security forces, according to a Syrian Observatory toll.

More than 12,000 people are also reported to have been arrested in the crackdown, and thousands of others have fled the country, rights groups say.

July 31st, 2011, 4:39 am

 

Atheist Syrian Salafist Against Dictatorships (ASSAD) said:

Dear Tara and Abboud,

For a nice break here is a fine performance by one of junior’s menhebbakjiyeh.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4U1CaRoyvPg&feature=player_embedded

You gotta love the menhebbakji in the red shirt, he doesn’t utter a word, but he reminds me of an old boyaji that used to work outside a friend’s shop in elba7sa (sa7t-el-marjeh), he’d do anything for a bat7a or a soudayeh!

July 31st, 2011, 4:41 am

 

Revlon said:

Several groups of tanks have defected in Hama.
This link claims live coverage from Aleppo-Road-District, Hama city (It looks like it could be a rerun of live coverage!):

http://qik.com/video/42764689

July 31st, 2011, 4:54 am

 

Revlon said:

Hama people’s only weapon to resist Jr’s Army attack;
Allahu Akbar!

July 31st, 2011, 5:05 am

 

r said:

دير الزور….أسماء الشهداء حتى هذه اللحظة :
1 ـ ماهر خلف العطية . الملقب : ماهر الأجنبي .
2 ـ ماجد هزاع .
3 ـ ماجد الأبكع .
4 ـ ياسر حمد الشعيبي .
5 ـ راغب عجيبة .
6 استشهادالشاب في حي العمال: محمد خلف الحسون
7 لشاب راغب حسين علي الحياوي
مسجى الان في مسجد الفتح
لشهيد ناصر الياسين الملقب ابو ياسين في منطقة الجورة8
AlFati7a upon their souls,
May God bless their families with solace,
and empower them with patience.
5 minutes ago

July 31st, 2011, 5:17 am

 

Revlon said:

B Asad is not a reformer; He governs by terrorism, torture, and robbery
He and his regime have beome something of the past
Jeffry Feltman

“بشار الاسد ليس اصلاحيا، بل هو رجل يعتمد حكمه على الارهاب والسرقة والتعذيب”

لقد أصبح هو ونظامه جزءا من الماضي”!

مساعد الوزيرة الأميركية لشؤون الشرق الأوسط جيفري فيلتمان

http://all4syria.info/web/archives/20069

July 31st, 2011, 5:30 am

 

syau said:

Revlon #59,

“Asad army invaded Hama city this morning.”

An army belonging to the country doesn’t ‘invade’ it. Neither does it ‘occupy’ it as you previously used to state.

The ‘peaceful protesters’ in Hama have set fire to various police stations and are continuing with their imposed blockades. No government, no matter which country it is will accept such terrorist actions.

The deployment of the Syrian army in Hama is to filter out the terrorists imposing these blockades, destroying infrastructure, carrying out acts of insurgencies and terrorising residents.

July 31st, 2011, 5:30 am

 

Revlon said:

Shareef Sh7adeh; regime mouthpiece! to Al3arabiya:

– I Know Colonel AlAs3ad personally. He left the army because his superior did not assign a Peugot car for him!

– He and other soldiers and officers are cosidered as deserters and not defectors from the army!

Dear “It-Is A-Facricated-Video-folks”, there it is, from a “credible” source of a discredited regime:
All those videoed officers and soldiers are genuine army personnel.

July 31st, 2011, 5:48 am

 

SANDRO LOEWE said:

Just came back from Syria once again, thanks God. Get in touch with some syrians. Most of them friends, who did not use to talk politics at all, now are openly attacking the regime, specially corruption, shabbiha and criminal security services. My perception is that more and more syrians are waiting for the isolated regime to fall. But they are waiting for Ramadan to begin to spare revolution widely in Damascus, maybe in Aleppo too? They say in Ramadan every day will be like fridays.

Personally I heard shots in my quarter that next morning turned to be some killings, I saw the closing of some neighbourhood by military special forces in Damascus, also my friend reported me of a fight in a Rif Damascus village and last I can personally confirm that security members at check points seem more and more nervious day after day.

I have the feeling that this regime has no future but also I am sure that they will not leave power peacefully. So, the conclusion could be very negative.

July 31st, 2011, 5:58 am

 

syau said:

Masked gunmen attacked a mini bus on the Damascus Highway in Tal Dahab, (near Hawla).
One woman was killed and 11 people, including children were injured during the attack.

In Hama, two law enforcement officers have been martyred after being shot by members of the terrorist gangs.
Police stations weren’t the only buildings set alight, the gangs also set other government buildings alight during their terror campaign in Hama.

This is just what I was afraid of, now that Ramadan is approaching, their acts of insurgencies seem to be intensifying. The army needs to filter out these terrorists and regain stability as soon as possible.

July 31st, 2011, 6:01 am

 

SANDRO LOEWE said:

Frankly I find it very childish to discuss about reality or fakeness of this Syria Free Army. The problem is that there is a city of about 700.000 citizens with 500.00 to 800.000 demonstrators (of course some coming from around villages) asking peacefully to change the regime or cancell the security criminal services, but the answer is clear now :

Attack and destroy anyone opposing the Big Brother, were they peaceful or violent. Assad and their mafia will kill and fight unarmed masses even in Ramadan. Their army of corrupt generals and hungry soldiers will obey orders and will rap girls and steal homes as if they were the new crusaders of XXI Century. Syria is now in the MIDDLE AGES of human values evolution.

I think that after what is happening in Syria there is no save heaven for Assads and they will likely find death in or out of Syria. It is terrible but very likely that even if he is kept President the hate he has created will bring him to death.

July 31st, 2011, 6:08 am

 

Revlon said:

66. Dear syau
You said:
“An army belonging to the country doesn’t ‘invade’ it. Neither does it ‘occupy’ it as you previously used to state”

I say: Actions of an Army commanded by an an illegitimate president are considered illegitimate. Therefore their entry in Hama is considered against the law of the People of the land and amounts to invasion of their city and properties.

You said: “The ‘peaceful protesters’ in Hama have set fire to various police stations and are continuing with their imposed blockades. No government, no matter which country it is will accept such terrorist actions”

I say: It is your and the trio of narcissist leader, serial killer brother, and mafioso cousin’s words against those of Mr Ford and the hundreds of thousands of Hama city people!

You said: “The deployment of the Syrian army in Hama is to filter out the terrorists imposing these blockades, destroying infrastructure, carrying out acts of insurgencies and terrorising residents”

I say: Sooner rather than later, The day will come when the agressors and those supporting their aggression shall be justly filtered out of Syria’s civil society!

July 31st, 2011, 6:10 am

 

SANDRO LOEWE said:

Fake video or fake regime, I dunno, this is the question…

July 31st, 2011, 6:18 am

 

Ali said:

syau.
id really like to know where you get your information from. if you could help me out id really appreciate it. as you know most of the media only tells one side of the story. and id only believe that side when pigs fly. so i am out to seek the truth and share it.
thank you

some guy in Damascus,
i haven’t forgotten about you. you will soon receive my reply

Allah yehmik ya Bashar

July 31st, 2011, 6:28 am

 

syau said:

Revlon,

“Actions of an Army commanded by an an illegitimate president are considered illegitimate. Therefore their entry in Hama is considered against the law of the People of the land and amounts to invasion of their city and properties.”

The people who count are the Syrian people, and the Syrian people support President Bashar Assad. Outside entities and those who are conspiring against Syria are not important and neither is their opinion of the President. They do not have the right to deem anyone illegitimate other than those in their own governing elite. They would do better concentrating on their own legitimacy and not interfere in Syria’s internal affairs.

“I say: It is your and the trio of narcissist leader, serial killer brother, and mafioso cousin’s words against those of Mr Ford and the hundreds of thousands of Hama city people!”

The visit by Ambassador Ford was a breach of protocol and a blind eye was turned to the blockades that were imposed illegally by the terrorist gangs in Hama. No matter how hard you try to deny it, they exist and are very active in destroying their own countries infrastructure as well as murdering security personnel.

“Sooner rather than later, The day will come when the agressors and those supporting their aggression shall be justly filtered out of Syria’s civil society!”

This I agree with you on this one. Sooner rather than later they terrorists will be filtered out. Gang members who were the aggressors in the massacre of 120 security personnel in Jisr Alshughour have been apprehended, and so will be the fate of the terrorist gang members in Hama, Deir Alzour, Homs and other provinces where the terrorists are unleashing their terror. Those supporting this revolution, therefore supporting terrorism, will sit and watch as their terrorist revolution is reduced to nothing but a bad memory.

July 31st, 2011, 6:40 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ ali: you say allah yehmik ya bashar
i say: allah yehmikee ya sooriya
presidents come and go, minsters come and go, humans come and go. but Syria is eternal.
im fed up with everyone connecting the fate of bashar with the fate of syria.
what if bashar got a heart attack? would syria die?

She has looked on the dry bones of a thousand empires, and will see the tomb of a thousand more before she dies. mark twain on Damascus

July 31st, 2011, 6:44 am

 

reem h said:

We will never permit Syria become ISLAMIYYA! ISLAMIYA-ISLAMIYA IS OUR ENNEMY. It is against secularism, multiculturalism and multiconfessionalism.

Bashar is now my only choice after seeing all of what Syria could become with these BAB el Hara wanna be and looking asses. Male-oriented society going back to the middle ages.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7tLi5AIzGI

ALLAH SURIYA BASHAR OU BASS.

July 31st, 2011, 6:59 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ 76 REEM H
besho was always your choice. its not like you were ever offered anything different.

disclaimer: no im not an islamist.

July 31st, 2011, 7:13 am

 

Ali said:

some guy in Damascus.

you are right when you say presidents come and go. but would Syria be what it is if it weren’t for the mighty leader? and in answer to your question… yes Syria will go down if (god forbid) Bashar were to step down. and God knows what other chaos would be in store.

ghar 3 mamnekhtar… Allah Suria ou Bashar.
is that better for your ears to hear? i have plenty more if your still not satisfied.

Allah yehmik ya Assadna.

July 31st, 2011, 7:28 am

 

Ali said:

some guy in Damascus.

you are right when you say presidents come and go. but would Syria be what it is if it wasn’t for the mighty leader? and in answer to your question… yes Syria will go down if (god forbid) Bashar were to step down. and God knows what other chaos would be in store.

ghar 3 mamnekhtar… Allah Suria ou Bashar.
is that better for your ears to hear? i have plenty more if your still not satisfied.

Allah yehmik ya Assadna.

July 31st, 2011, 7:31 am

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

There weren’t “armed terrorist groups” so far. But now, this junta is creating them in Hama Homs and elsewhere.

If tanks rolled into my city, no matter who’s tanks, I would gather my friends and neighbors to drive those tanks out of my city. I don’t expect the Syrians to behave differently than I would.
.

July 31st, 2011, 7:33 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

what about rami’s monopoly on syrias economy or 3atef najib’s horrofic actions? and how bashar responded to them?
why do you assume bashar is the only human that can lead syria?
there are other syrians that should get a decent opportunity.
my dear country man ali, how do you feel when you have to deal with those expensive telecom rates? or when you have some papers you want to get done and the bureaucracy is pathetic. my most important question: do you think bashar is providing us with freedom of opinion?

July 31st, 2011, 7:37 am

 

Pre-Ramadan Massacres « Qunfuz said:

[…] Syrian people, dignity and territory. I do hope the Free Syrian Army is real. (Joshua Landis thinks it isn’t; but then, Joshua Landis has, repulsively, started to refer to pro-regime Syrians as […]

July 31st, 2011, 8:00 am

 

Tara said:

Aljazeera reporting 120 killed today- one day before the beginning of Ramadan.

July 31st, 2011, 8:32 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ tara,
i think today is going to be the bloodiest day. they gave up their lives so our dreams can come true.
may they rest in peace.

July 31st, 2011, 8:36 am

 

Tara said:

Some Guy In Damascus

I am very inflamed. I never support violence but if this to continue, may be it is time for armed resistance against this monstrous regime.

July 31st, 2011, 8:39 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

today will be the first taraweeh prayers. instead of demonstrating in the heat of friday prayers now people can wait till night. it will be cooler then which gives them( and the shabeeha) more stamina. the greatest month in bashar pathetic reign is dawning upon us.

July 31st, 2011, 8:49 am

 

hsyrian said:

@82
The full quote of Pre-Ramadan Massacres « Qunfuz is

I do hope the Free Syrian Army is real.
(Joshua Landis thinks it isn’t; but then, Joshua Landis has, repulsively, started to refer to pro-regime Syrians as ‘pro-stability.’)

Disclaimers
Discussing anonymous fabricated Youtube videos is like building on quicksand.
Die Geschichte wiederholt sich, zuerst als Tragödie, dann als Farce.

July 31st, 2011, 8:51 am

 

ss said:

MNA comment 57:
“But hasn’t this been the strategy of the regime all along? And isn’t this strategy responsible for growing the demonstrations from few hundred in Dar3a to few hundred thousand nationwide? And can the regime and the country afford the consequences of this solution alone?”

I am not advocating violence, but I believe when you are faced by an armed organization then you should fight these elements. First, The goverment was dragged to this road, and I do not agree with your statement “been the strategy of the regime all along?”. Second, if we take examples like Lattakia, Banyas, Deraa, I believe the goverment did a very good job in fighting these thugs and look at these cities now, I hardly hear news coming out of them. Third, The goverment from day one stated that they do not want corruption, will move with ESLA7AT, but the armed thugs did not give them a choice except fight. In regard to “can the regime and the country afford the consequences of this solution alone”: Of course not, war will never ever solve any problem, and the army has been very careful in dealing with the issue, and trying to chase the armed people, and only the armed people. For that I do not see that the army declared a WAR rather an elective extraction of the armed elements in the so called revolution.

July 31st, 2011, 9:00 am

 

ss said:

85 TARA:

“I am very inflamed”# good to hear that. “I never support violence” You stand with violence from day 1, unfortunately the opposition whether honest or monstrous has been with the violence from day one knowing that this is the only way to bring the regime down. “but if this to continue, may be it is time for armed resistance against this monstrous regime”: So you still believe that the army men killed in Jisr Alshogor was not the act of your beloved armed thugs. It looks nice to change the name of the armed men from ARMED RADICAL ISLAMISTS ALAH WA AKBAR EVILISH MONSTROUS militins to the sexy term armed resistence. Pathetic

July 31st, 2011, 9:07 am

 

Atheist Syrian Salafist Against Dictatorships (ASSAD) said:

Akhi S.G.I.Dimashq, Aboud, Tara, and all the freedom-loving Syrians out there:

I’ve come to the conclusion that with people like Rheem, SS, Ali and all other committed Baathist menhebbakjiyeh and electronic shabbiha, discussing and debating is a total waste of time and energy. I would like to talk with freedom-loving Syrians about what we can do to advance the cause of our revolution.

Innocent unarmed people are being picked off by snipers just as I type these words. Whole civilian neighborhoods are being stormed by tanks to keep a dictator and his mafia in power, while we sit here and try to reason with supporters of this criminal behavior!

قرفنا منك يابشار قرفنا منك ومن حزبك ومن عصاباتك المجرمة التي تستخدم الجيش السوري الشريف لخدمة مصالحها الخاصة لتشن حرباً شاملة ضد الشعب والمواطنين العزل

My fellow free Syrians, let’s unite together to work towards realizing a free, democratic, and inclusive Syria for all Syrians of all persuasions. Trivial disagreements have to be put aside to concentrate on the noble goal before us. The regime will commit any crime to protect its stranglehold on power and its vested interests.

July 31st, 2011, 9:17 am

 

syrian said:

Millions of people with Bashar al-Assad to see these videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2Moows3Hn8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVH5Q6zHgvQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNEy9u5_KMA&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGU0YsZU_Qk&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dfRSN1YcmY&feature=related

There are millions more we love Bashar al-Assad

There are terrorists in Syria killed Syrian army and spreading terror among the inhabitants

People want Bashar al-Assad

July 31st, 2011, 9:29 am

 

Tohiko said:

This is the most idiotic reason I’ve ever heard?
Baby voices? Can’t you tell that these baby voices and laughs are added over by the supporters?
Who wrote this article, a five-years old?

July 31st, 2011, 9:33 am

 

syrian said:

Even the elderly with Bashar al-Assad

We love Bashar

Convinced this thing 90% of the people of Syria with Bashar

July 31st, 2011, 9:34 am

 

Revlon said:

85. Dear Tara:
I share your feeling of pain and helplessness.

I am hoping that the FSA gets the needed international recognition and the logistical support from Turkey.

The FSA can start by liberating pockets of land along the Turkish-Syrian border and engage Asad units away from civilian areas.

Such scenario would save civilian lives and unnecessary destruction of infrastructure as well as encourage larger defections from Asad forces.

July 31st, 2011, 9:38 am

 

beaware said:

Syria’s Sunnis and Iraq’s Shiites
29/07/2011
By Adel Al Toraifi

http://www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=2&id=26061

Before the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, advocates for removing the regime of Saddam Hussein argued that the war wouldn’t last longer than 90 days, and that the new Iraq would be able to conduct a transitional phase with a ruling council comprising all ethnic sects and components. Needless to say, the war came to an end in only 21 days, but the sectarian war is still raging until today, having cost, at a conservative estimate, the lives of around 60,000 civilians, in incidents related to terrorism and armed militias. Iraq was freed from the Baathist party’s tyranny, but it fell captive to heinous sectarian violence.

This week, Syria’s uprising will come to the end of its sixth month, without any sign on the horizon indicating that there is an end in sight. On the contrary, the uprising is gaining momentum and popularity by the hour. It is apparent that the Syrian state and its government apparatus, especially the security services, have become completely exhausted. By examining this scene, we can conclude two things: firstly, that all of the regime’s apparatus have failed to rein in civil disobedience. Secondly, it has become impossible for Syria, as a number of observers and writers have pointed out, to return to the state of affairs prior to 26 January, because a lot of blood has been shed since then.

Despite all this, the Syrian story seems far from over, or to be more accurate, it is still in its early chapters. The weary Syrian regime continues to stubbornly and ferociously fight for survival. It appears the security apparatus, with both its partisan and sectarian wings, has become more elusive and less confrontational towards the crowds of protesters than it was in the early days of the uprising. Yet casualties are still falling at the hands of the regime, and the number of detainees is well into the thousands. In spite of all this, and the unprecedented state of civil disobedience in Syria’s modern history, the regime still exists. Even though its regional and international relations have been considerably harmed, and even though a cloud of looming war and international sanctions now hang over its head, the current regime remains the only legitimate representative of the Syrian state in the eyes of the international community, and this is for one single reason: the absence of a (political) alternative that could fill the power vacuum and implement the necessary transitional phase.

In Syria’s case, the “alternative” has become a very sensitive issue. Decades of authoritarian rule by the Baathist party and the Alawite sect has weakened the chances of the emergence of political parties and civil apparatus capable of offsetting the political and security vacuum that would be caused by the collapse of the regime. In addition to this, there is the reluctance of regional and international powers to directly intervene in Syria, which in itself has created a difficult situation for the protesters demanding the overthrow of the regime. On one hand, the opposition on the ground is demanding the fall of the regime unaided and through peaceful means, that is, a mixture of protests and civil disobedience. On the other hand, the opposition is supposed to unite its ranks and coordinate its position. In other words, its position should be translated into a transitional council or government, which acts on the internal and external fronts, whilst the opposition continues to clash with the regime on a daily basis.

In this context, some have expressed surprise at the enormous enthusiasm shown by Western countries, and some Arab States, for direct intervention in Libya’s crisis under the pretext of protecting civilians. Right now Syria’s regime is using the army and Special Forces units to suppress civilians throughout Syria. Moreover, Syria’s behavior and policies under Bashar al-Assad have been no less radical and destructive than Gaddafi’s policies. Both regimes have openly carried out assassinations, and sought to threaten stability and peace in the region. But whilst it has been justifiable to assist the revolutionaries to remove the Libyan leader, those same countries have abstained from helping to overthrow the Levantine version of Gaddafi. Some argue that this is all to do with oil interests and Libya’s geographic proximity to Europe’s borders. Despite that, Syria is no less strategically important, with respect to stability in the region.

Whilst it is true that Turkey, the US, and the Europeans have openly declared that it is no longer necessary for al-Assad to remain in power, and that they would prefer his departure over the continuing deaths and protests. There are [also] reports of these countries coordinating with the opposition internally and externally, and about them providing aid with regards to communication technology and documentation. Yet it will require much more than this to remove the [Syrian] regime.

The bitter truth for both sides of the conflict – the regime and the people – is that the country is divided along sectarian lines. If one side emerges victorious, the entire internal formula will change. The Alawite regime, in its capacity as a guarantor for other minorities (the Christians and Druze), now stands in a fierce confrontation with a peaceful opposition that is dominated by members of the Sunni sect. Even though the regime presents itself in a non-partisan, pan-national, and secular manner, it ultimately depends heavily on the loyalty of the Alawite sect, and rallying the minorities around it. This is why the regime distances itself from the idea of sectarianism in times of strength, and summons it in times of weakness.

Today the opposition is trying to claim that the regime is the one attempting to incite sectarianism. That might be true, but it does not deny the fact that the country is in a state of sectarian turmoil verging on civil war. Attempts to downplay the sectarian question, and the assumption that the country is witnessing a state of democratic, revolutionary transformation through peaceful means, might postpone tackling this crisis, but the underlying issue will remain.

According to political and economic calculations, the Syrian regime should have fallen within the first three months, or within 90 days. Even Israel’s Ministry of Defense commissioned a study with the collaboration of international experts which reached the conclusion that the al-Assad regime would inevitably fall within three to six months, due to the cessation of the economy, production and services all across Syria, as a result of civil disobedience. However, the regime is still going strong and is still very active in suppressing protesters.

There are many explanations for this; some referring to Hezbollah and Iran’s role in supporting al-Assad economically and militarily. Without doubt, both Hezbollah and Iran are keen on al-Assad staying in power till the very end, but what could the Iranians – or indeed the Lebanese – do in the face of a popular uprising against a minority regime?

What some don’t want to openly admit is the fact that al-Assad remaining in power is primarily contingent on the rallying of his sect along with other minorities around him, in a battle which they view as a matter of “survival”. Alawites and Christians clearly saw how the US invasion of Iraq led to the exclusive possession of power by former opposition Iraqi Shiite parties, and how former Baathist party members, most of whom were Sunni, were exposed to debaathification or even murder at the hands of sectarian assassination cells. Likewise, religious minorities like Christians and Yazidis [in Iraq] have been systematically targeted with the purpose of forcing them to leave the country.

Syria could be another Iraq, and there is a justified fear of the bitter Iraqi experience repeating itself in Syria, but this time without foreign military intervention. Divisions and rifts which occurred at the opposition conferences held in Antalya, Brussels, and Paris prove that Syrian unity and nationalism are not evident in the ranks of the opposition. Some argue that it takes time for the formation of the opposition and the establishment of a transitional period, and this period is usually beset by differences and divisions. However, the Syrian case suggests deeper and more complicated divisions.

If the regime falls, which is a serious possibility, the Sunni majority would be required to offer guarantees to others that it would respect their shared coexistence, and that it wouldn’t resort to targeting other sects under the pretext of the debaathification of Syria’s Baathist party. Some might condemn the idea of demanding that the Sunni sect be responsible for creating concordance amongst the opposition ranks, whilst it is currently being targeted by the regime, but the Iraqi lesson tells us that overthrowing a despotic regime and replacing it with democratic elections does not mean the end of sectarianism. Rather, it continues to play a divisive and corrosive role through new means.

If the Syrian Kurds do not trust the Arab sincerity in backing their demands, and if Christians and Druze are worried about replacing the rule of a despotic minority with the rule of an elected majority, then there is a deep-rooted sectarian problem between the components of the [Syrian] people, which should not be ignored or downplayed with respect to its future impact on the course of events.

July 31st, 2011, 9:47 am

 

Tara said:

I heard yesterday the regime is unleashing more of Its electronic army officers. I am expecting SC will be infested by new names who have nothing to say other than ” wallah mnhebak ya Besho”. I guess Besho’ lovers will provide us with plenty of
entertainment going forward. I wish they come with a photo. It may help in my studying the mnhebak phenomena as I would like to see the phenotype associated with the expression of slavery.

July 31st, 2011, 9:56 am

 

Observer said:

What is the purpose of these attacks? Is it desperation or is it a strategy? It is clear that the use of force will not solve the situation.

I have read the pro regime comments on this blog and I am cannot see logic only fear. It is clear that the regime is now fearful of falling and those supporting it are clearly showing it on this blog.

As I asked my questions before it is clear that we are beyond a point of no return in Syria therefore the regime is doomed.

Finally Junior is clearly no longer in charge. All of his previous declarations have no basis in the reality of people in their every day life.

The methods used in the first few months were copy cat from the Iranian methods used in 09 and they did not work for a variety of reasons. Now the system is reverting to the late Hafez methods.

In the meantime, the bacteria have developed significant antibiotic resistance.

July 31st, 2011, 10:04 am

 

Aboud said:

Pain and helplessness my friend? Banish them from your thoughts. If the regime hadn’t thought things were so very critical, it wouldn’t have lashed out so crazily.

People have been likening these military offensives to Hitler’s last gamble Ardennes offensive in 1944, what was later called the Battle of the Bulge.

(Maybe we shouldn’t call it that, as Imad Mustapha and Waleed Mu’alem are unbeatable in any battle of the bulges).

The regime’s resources are limited, and are being squandered. The opposition draws from the strength and commitment of the Syrian people as a whole. If junior thinks anyone is going to be intimated, then the little shit does not know a thing about the people he’s supposed to have gotten 99.9% of the vote from.

By the way, I made a special To-Do list as a reminder for a particularly clueless menhebak here, just in case he forgot. He still has to;

1) Find sectarian comments on Facebook pages.

2) Find the posts Aboud posted during “peak demonstration time”

3) Bitch to No Klue about Aboud.

4) Get in touch with his “friend” from Amin Al Seyasi.

5) Educated himself about who Najati Tayara is, and what the heck is this thing “badal” that they are all talking about.

6) Whine some more about Aboud (hehehehe)

7) Get his money back for the lousy Engish classes he’s been taking.

8) Find one other person who has even heard of the pro-besho rallies those three shabiha scum got killed for.

Tara, and they will all post with the same crappy level of English.

July 31st, 2011, 10:13 am

 

hsyrian said:

2 Law Enforcement Members Martyred by Gunmen in Hama, Armed Groups Block Roads in Deir Ezzor

Jul 31, 2011

HAMA, DEIR EZZOR, (SANA)_Two law enforcement members were martyred by armed groups in Hama who set police stations on fire, vandalized public and private properties, set roadblocks and barricades and burned tires at the entrance of the city and in its streets.

Army units are removing the barricades and roadblocks set by the armed groups at the entrance of the city.

The Law-Enforcement Forces in Hama has confronted an attack targeting a security headquarters by the armed groups who used machineguns.

SANA was informed by residents in the city that armed groups of scores of gunmen are stationed on the rooftops of the main buildings in the streets of the city, carrying up-to-date machine guns and RPGs and shooting intensively to terrorize citizens.

Armed Groups in Deir Ezzor Block Roads, Put Barriers in City Streets

The armed terrorist groups in Deir Ezzor blocked some roads and created barriers in the city streets terrorizing people.

The terrorist groups also attacked the law-enforcement forces and police headquarters and stole some weapons and ammunitions.

The law-enforcement forces confronted these groups and exchanged fire with them. The law-enforcement forces are still pursuing these armed groups and deal with the situation there with suitable ways.

Inhabitants of Deir Ezzor expressed fear of these groups’ perpetrations and stressed rejection of such acts that hurt the homeland, in general, and Deir Ezzor, in particular.

Disclaimers
Discussing anonymous fabricated Youtube videos is like building on quicksand.
Die Geschichte wiederholt sich, zuerst als Tragödie, dann als Farce.

July 31st, 2011, 10:15 am

 

aboali said:

ok that’s it, this regime has gone too far. It has declared war on Syria and Syrians. If you still support it after all this, you have blood on your hands too. This is the start of a civil war, we’re taking up arms now and fighting back, you only have yourselves to blame. The regime’s strong men have sacrificed Syria, and it’s own Alawi sect in order to stay in power. I urge all the regime supporters to switch sides now, and quicken the inevitable fall of this murderous regime, otherwise you’re accomplices to murder, and will be treated as such.

July 31st, 2011, 10:23 am

 

Aboud said:

@99 Another SANA spam-bot heard from. Amazing how the regime never discovers these armed groups except after a massive demonstration

Aboali @100 Well said. From this point on, any menhebak is a brazen supporter of blatant war crimes and murders, and will be treated as such.

July 31st, 2011, 10:27 am

 

Abughassan said:

Yes,Bashar is not in charge,I said that few weeks ago,however,he is still responsible and he will have to either reverse course or resign,I do not believe he is willing or will be allowed to reverse course.I do not know why the army has to enter Hama,I said before that the situation in Hama can not last much longer and the police and government services have to be allowed in but nobody wants to see tanks in Hama.
Security forces were told that Ramadan is the last chance to secure troubled spots and if they fail,total chaos will be the end result.Ramadan is likely to be a decisive month for all.
Politically,a meeting of the parliament will take place in a week followed by other attempts to calm the streets,the problem is that people do not trust the regime and anything that is called a “law” can be ignored at anytime by a low-ranking officer in security forces.this regime can not be trusted.
As for revlon hoping for a second army receiving help from turkey and support from the west,I say: good luck,this is a bad idea from the start and it will only make things worse if it mushrooms.more individual defections are likely but a major division is a remote possibility,however,there is a great deal of fatigue and
frustration in the army ,and if things continue to deteriorate,the army will have
to take over the government and I will support that as long as it is done for a limited period of time that is followed by elections.you can not simply bring the regime down,you need a body that can keep peace and order,and with a
fractured questionable opposition,the army is the only choice until opposition leaders can make their case that they are ready. The regime may still survive
this crisis short-term but it will not last long.

July 31st, 2011, 10:29 am

 

Revlon said:

#50 Dear majed Khaldoon,
You asked about the proportion of tribal members of the armed forces.

In this video, released in March, This Sheikh, who is a lawyer, quoted 50% figure for the proportion of tribal people in the general Syrian population (3:10 mark ).
If one to exclude the Sunnis of major cities, who are largely excluded from the army, the proportion of tribal members in the army could be higher than 50%!

By the way, the news has it that Sheikh shyook 3ashayer of Syria, S Nawwaf Al Basheer, has been arrested by security forces today.

بيان : عشائر سوريا تعلن الثورة على نظام بشار الاسد

July 31st, 2011, 10:41 am

 

Aboud said:

Angry Arab says it well, he pulls no punches

http://angryarab.blogspot.com/2011/07/bashshar-in-footsteps-of-his-murderous.html

“Bashshar: In the footsteps of his murderous father

No argument can or shall be made in favor of the lousy Syrian regime. By any measure or any criteria, this is a failed and lousy regime that does not deserve any support whatsoever. The Syrian regime has given reason for the Syrian people to revolt in any way possible to overthrow it. The only progressive argument that I can see being made is for its overthrow.

Bashshar Al-Asad is just another ugly face of an ugly regime that is rotten to the core and that deserve only overthrow. All its slogans are empty and bogus: its record against Israel is lousy: its army and intelligence services only show courage against unarmed civilians.

It is a regime that accepts humiliation by Israel at every corner. It is a regime that betrayed its own slogans on social justice, freedom, or Arab unity. It is a regime that lies as a matter of official policy.

Any support for the Syrian regime translates as support for its war crimes. It is a time for paying tribute to the innocent civilians who are being massacred by the criminal arms of the regime.”

July 31st, 2011, 10:47 am

 

Aboud said:

According to Al Arabiya, the shabiha scum are using children as human shields as they advance into the town. Shields from what? According to the menhebak scum on this forum, there was never any defections in Abukamal.

July 31st, 2011, 11:04 am

 

aboali said:

After the horrific events of today, this is my final plea to my brothers in the Alawi sect. Please look carefully and think about what this regime is doing to the country and it’s citizens, you must break with it and abandon it immediately. It is starting a civil war, which will have disastrous consequences on the entire country in general, and the Alawi sect in particular. It has no problem in sacrificing you in order for Bashar and his family to stay in power. tell me, is it worth losing your family, village, and relatives in order for this family to rule and enjoy money and privilege? It’s your choice, please choose wisely.

July 31st, 2011, 11:06 am

 

Tara said:

A baby girl was killed in Daraa by Abu Zein ( Abu Hafiz, that is) today. Aljazeera showed her devastated mother and the baby wrapped with white shroud. We should create a poster of all the children killed by Abu Hafiz and send it to his residence so Abu and Oum Hafiz enjoy.

July 31st, 2011, 11:16 am

 

Aboud said:

Memo to junior; your son will never be president. One way or another, you are the last Assad president of this country.

July 31st, 2011, 11:18 am

 

Talal said:

This is not a revolution I’m from Damascus and I know that most of the people is not supporting them because of the ciaos they are causing.
It’s easy to say freedom but that is not a reason to commits crimes in the name of freedom!!
if this is a revolution then it should win the battle long time ago but till now the majority of the Syrian people is against them and that is why they fail!

July 31st, 2011, 11:21 am

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

TARA @ 96

As usual, the spoiled intellectually challenged brats of the electronic army insist on proving their uselessness. With writers such as Louai, SNK, SYAU, and SS, among others, Syria Comment has lost what little was left of respect and credibility. It is now simply a place for a few regime agents, paid or self appointed volunteers, to show that they are dishing it out to the opposition, and to get the nods from their thuggish bosses and self congratulatory frat-boys laughs.

It is foolish of Bashar’s so-called electronic soldiers to focus their efforts on Syria Comment after they have made it completely irrelevant in policy circles with their amateurish and both covert and overt sectarian literature . Do they think that anyone interested in policy and in Syria will get anywhere near Syria Comment for inspiration given that the entirety of regime lackeys on SC consider SNK’s childish and painfully bad writings examples of eloquence and creativity.

From my tree, I have been observing real leaders of some developing countries, and the contrast between them and what the Baath in general, and the Assad family have been giving Syria for forty years is staggering, and more accurately horrific. I now understand some insiders who have observed the eternal accidental laughing dictator only to describe him simply as teenager “walad”. The sad thing is that this “walad” is now one of the world’s certified criminal villains who will be welcomed into the trash bin of history by equally repulsive villains, but who possess intellectual stamina far beyond the combined intellect of himself, his aids, and all of his lovers no matter how long the flag they manage to make while chanting his name into a self inflicted herd euphoria.

Thanks to the inept dictator and his close circle of family thugs and advisors as well as the goons and thugs on Syria Comment and in the streets of victimized Syrian cities and towns, today will most likely mark the formal transition of the uprising from an opposition uprising into an act of liberation. It could have been different and a national reconciliation, generally the case after opposition victory, was still possible. Alas, with the regime’s actions in Homs, and with today’s massacres, liberation is now the only path for Syrians, and what happens after liberation to the traitors should escape no one. There will unfortunately be no reconciliations, only long jail terms, and for some, the noose, how tragic.

History has shown us some good examples of non violent liberation movements that were successful. Syria’s liberation should remain a largely non-violent movement which, in my opinion and hopes, is a viable option to passivity and/or violence.

Long Live Free Syria, with its rat-holes, treetops, and every blood vessel and tissue where heroic germs live

July 31st, 2011, 11:25 am

 

Tara said:

I am so de- impressed with Recap Tayip Erdogan.  His anti-Israel rhetoric were only rhetoric and probably only meant to capture Arab audience in order to achieve national Turkish interests.  His heart goes for the Palestinian and not the Syrians?  Where is he now?  Killing 121 people in Hama does not warrant condemnation?

July 31st, 2011, 11:43 am

 

ss said:

Commnet#110.

Where are you Erdogan???Where are you USA???Where are you UK???Where are you France???

You know that we started all that hoping you come and invade Syria and help us establish Imara Islamia. The MBs needs your help and we are soo good now until we get what we want and then will declare JIHAD against you later. Now we are asking your help.

July 31st, 2011, 11:50 am

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: SS

RE: “…Where are you USA??? Where are you UK??? Where are you France???…”

Like I said many times before on this blog, no one cares about Syria. You’re on your own on this, Baby. Your precious Assad Mafia is paying for its 40-year foreign policy of deceit, betrayal, backstabbing and general low-rent hostility. Now that all the chickens are coming home to roost, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that the world community is turning its back on Syria.

Last chance to place a bet on which day of Ramadan Bashar and his Mafia fall. I have the 10th of August.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Dale_Andersen/post_2253_b_913417_100069345.html

July 31st, 2011, 12:00 pm

 

Badr said:

“In over four months of protests, no-one can predict with any confidence what the outcome will be.

The uprising won’t go away but has yet to engulf the two biggest cities of Damascus and Aleppo.

The protesters face a government that is talking about comprehensive reforms, but hitting back with ferocity.

The Americans have not explicitly called for President Assad to go. The international community is not united on this in the way it was on Libya. So there is not going to be any outside intervention.

It is up to the Syrians themselves, and at this stage, nobody can say how it will go.”

Jim Muir
BBC News, Beirut

July 31st, 2011, 12:02 pm

 

Tara said:

#111

Did you not read my previous posts? Tara is not interested in carrying a conversation. She is soo not impressed! Tara likes free smart minds only. Does not matter if they were pro or anti. She hates slavery of thoughts and mind. Can you please get it. Feel free to comment but do not refer to my posts by name or number.

July 31st, 2011, 12:02 pm

 

Aboud said:

Well well, look what slithered out from under a menhebak rock @111. Having fun habibi? Enjoying the smoke from Hama and Dayr el Zour? Remember that feeling in the days to come. It will be the last time you and your ilk will have occasion to smile.

A week ago, an anti junior demonstration occurred at an Alawite neighborhood in Homs. No, they weren’t calling for freedom and a “secular” society, they were denouncing what they saw as junior’s pansy response. They wanted more blood and guts. Their chant was “Bashar 3al 3eyada, wa Maher 3al qiyada”

Ladies and gentlemen (and you SS), what you are seeing now is junior trying to prove to his shabiha scum constituents that he does indeed have a pair. Without his army, junior is useless. The army is the only tool he has, and he doesn’t even know how to use it properly.

The shabiha scum think that Cro-Magnon Maher could wrap this all up before Taraweh prayers. Maher Al-Athad has the intelligence and subtlety of Fred Flinstone. He will have to put a tank on every street in Syria, the way he’s going.

From this point on, ANY response and retaliation by the revolution is warranted and justified. Sleep well scum, you don’t have many days left in Syria.

July 31st, 2011, 12:05 pm

 

N.Z. said:

This regime is brilliant. Subjugating a big chunk of Syrians to their perverted logic is to be commended. What is alarming is the higher percentage of women vs. men who had have it with this junta.

To wake up this morning, a day before the start of the holy month of Ramadan, tanks and armour surrounding all the major cities, 125 persons dead, is more than just a little worrisome.

The protesters slogan ” down with the regime/Assad” is analogous with armed gangs.

The protesters are not armed, period. Their crime, they do not want another day to do this regime. This Assadism cult is in its last days. Gone are the days that they can shut a people with all kind of Assadists brutality.

It pains me to see some still acting as cheerleaders for an entity that is similar to the Zionist entity, Americans in massacring people all in the name of armed militias/ Islamists….

July 31st, 2011, 12:11 pm

 

Tara said:

Just to be clear. I am against any physical foreign intervention in Syria period. I welcome moral support and selective sanctions against the thugs. I just dislike hypocrites. I dislike people that use the “resistance” cover to achieve their goals and agenda.

I truly have no doubt in my mind that the the people of Syria will prevail. And we will do it all
alone. We do not need you. Your silence is not going to kill us. It is morally killing you, and after all people are judged by what they stand for.

July 31st, 2011, 12:34 pm

 

Revlon said:

A List of more than 50 civilians abducted by Jr’s security forces today,
Mu3addamiyyeh, Damascus Governorate

The Syrian Revolution 2011 الثورة السورية ضد بشار الاسد
ريف دمشق :: المعضمية ::
القائمه التي تم تحديثها لأسماء المعتقلين
الذين استطعنا الحصول عليهم ::
١) الشيخ :: محمد نعيم الحريري
٢) الدكتور :: عبدو قرقورا
…٣) الأستاذ :: سعيد دوبا
٤) الشاب :: مروان أحمد بلال
٥) الشاب :: محمد علي بلال
٦) الشاب :: أبو خالد الواوي
٧) الشاب :: خالد إبراهيم
٨) الشاب:: أبو أكرم زياده
٩) أبو مظهر الخطيب ومع كل أولاده
١٠) اثنا عشر شاباً من أل قرقورا
١١) الشيخ :: محمد الواوي
١٢) الشيخ :: علي الحاج
١٣) الدكتور:: محمد خير الخطيب
١٤) الشاب :: قتبه الخطيب
١٥) المخبر:: أبو أحمد قرقورا
١٦) الشاب :: خالد الجلب
١٧) الشيخ أبو مازن الخطيب مع ابنه
١٨) الشاب :: محمود حماده
١٩) أحمد نتوف أبو غياث
٢٠) الدكتور :: عبد المهيمن الدمراني
٢١) محمد الشيخ 26 سنة
٢٢) ابو خالد الواوي 76سنة
٢٣) عبدو قرقورا 61سنة مع اولاده الاربع
٢٤) انس الرفاعي 17 سنة
٢٥) عبد العليم الرفاعي 18 سنة
٢٦) عبد الرزاق حمادة
٢٧) ابو خالد الخطيب
٢٨) نور ماجد الخطيب
٢٩) مؤيد الشيخ واخوته الثلاثة
٣٠) اولاد عبدو دلال السبعة
٣١) محمد علي جابر وحيد على تسع بنات
٣٢) الشيخ محمد نور الجلب
٣٣) مازن مصطفى الخطيب

July 31st, 2011, 12:35 pm

 

Akbar Palace said:

I am so de- impressed with Recap Tayip Erdogan. His anti-Israel rhetoric were only rhetoric and probably only meant to capture Arab audience in order to achieve national Turkish interests. His heart goes for the Palestinian and not the Syrians? Where is he now? Killing 121 people in Hama does not warrant condemnation?

Tara,

I hear your words and I sympathize with you. However, the US and Israel have been burned numerous times in the ME.

We come to help and we get burned by those we help. Or those that we help are too lazy to take the training and weapons to defend themselves. How many times has that happened? I can’t count that high.

Lastly, the Double Standard© has been unfurled and exposed for everyone to see. Turkey and the rest of the ME has one standard for Israel and another standard for themselves, and yet another for the Palestinians. Thinking people such as yourself are beginning to see the light.

The best answer is democracy, voting, and term limits.

July 31st, 2011, 12:38 pm

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

Demonstrable Intellect

To all Syria Comment Menhebbakites and war crimes accomplices, care to identify yourself in this wonderful show of brilliant class.I will not say anything to the government of Liberated Syria, but anything you say can and will be used against you in the Hague.

Congratulation Jr., these are your lovers. With lovers like these, who needs the rest of the Syrian expats community.

July 31st, 2011, 12:41 pm

 

mhd rabeesh said:

yesterday , A bus full of civilian passangers was chased and attacked by a group of “peaceful protesters” , as alawys they were using motorbikes , covering their faces and carrying firearms and long knives , after they succeeded stoping the bus they slaughtered the driver and a female passenger and took her daughter as a hostage …. The terrotery where the gang came from is known for its extremists and poorly educated habitants .. And those of this kind are mainly the fuel of this “revolution” .. Arab Media channels which probaganda is to spread the hate of Iran and “shie’a” in order to serve american interests in the region have done their job with those and they think now that they must fight the regime and other sects of syria in the name of “allah” as “mujahedeen ” .. every body knows here in syria the fact that except the islamic extrimist figures no one represent those gangs …no need to mention that the gangs belong to many nationalities / personally i witnessed the capturing of one and he was from Algeria .. There are lots of reports about capturing armed gang members from iraq ,lebanon , jordan, afghanistan , saudia arabia , libya and even turkey …/ these multi national gangs has nothing in between except “jihad” motive and they are protected by civilians living in arias where the same idiology spreads.

July 31st, 2011, 12:42 pm

 

Revlon said:

A standoff is brewing between the union of the Syrian tribes and the regime over the abduction of Sheikh Shuyookh Al3ashayer of Syria.

Shuyookh Al3ashayer are to meet in madafet AlBasheer 5:00 pm Syria time.
An Ultimatum is expected to be issued to force the release of their chief.

Sheikh Khaled AlKhalaf speakes to Al3arabiya today
لواء الضباط الاحرار الشيخ خالد الخلف يتحدث عن اختطاف الشيخ نواف
البشير ويهدد نظام الاسد في حال لم يتم طلاق سراحه

July 31st, 2011, 12:53 pm

 

Revlon said:

Armored units defected and succeeded in controlling the headquarters of security forces in Sooran, Hama Governorate.
لواء الضباط الاحرار
لواء الضباط الاحرار : حماة : صوران :
انشقاقات في صفوف الجيش بالعتاد الكامل مع وجود بعض الدبابات
حيث اشتبكو مع عناصر المخابرات وأمن الدولة و الأمن السياسي و الأمن العسكري و قاموا بالسيطرة الكاملة على المفارز الأمنية

2 hours ago ·

July 31st, 2011, 1:00 pm

 

NK said:

Dear HAMSTER

I personally know the guy to the very right of that photo. He’s Lebanese xD

July 31st, 2011, 1:05 pm

 

Ales said:

It’s a sad day for Syria, but it was expected.

People always want more and don’t know where to stop (Hitler, for example, could not stop after early success). In Syria, people demands have increased a lot from start of protests, at some point government was bound to stop negotiating. Any government in the world can’t allow Hama like situation, it shows weakness and lack of state attributes. If allowed too long, other areas would follow it (Deir el-Zour tried to follow). When today government went to remove blockades (not attack cities) in Hama and Deir el-Zour, shooting (very likely from both sides) broke out. Such blockades are stupid idea, because sooner or later they provoke blood and action.

Because of history, religion fanaticism and external support for rebels, prospects for Hama are bleak. It will take a long time, but at the end, most likely scenario is another crushed rebellion. Before that, blood spilled and hatred will increase and stop rational thinking. Some foreign countries and part of expatriate opposition want this, from safe distance.
I hope the rest of Syria will not follow Hama.

July 31st, 2011, 1:08 pm

 

Abu Umar said:

SYAU and other menhebek lunatics, is the slaughter, jailing and torture of tens of thousands of Syrians by the Asad regime so it can maintain it’s grip on power, “hateful sectarian venom”?

Don’t be so over-confident menhebek lunatics, and the Syrian Sunnis won’t be cowards like Waleed Jumblat and Sa’d al-Hariri.

July 31st, 2011, 1:09 pm

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

@ 111

You are scared little one aren’t you?. Rest assured Syrians will reject foreign interference, but they will not stand with laughing Jr’s fake resistance any more, they will work on two fronts, one against foreign intervention and another to get rid of this cancerous regime. They are smart, they can do parallel processing, something tall laughing Jr. can’t, even if he is connected to Maher in parallel mode.

Dear NK @ 123

Then, i stand corrected. The following:

Congratulation Jr., these are your lovers. With lovers like these, who needs the rest of the Syrian expats community.

Should be corrected to:

Congratulation Jr., these are your lovers. With lovers like these, who needs the rest of the Syrian expats community.

July 31st, 2011, 1:10 pm

 

Aboud said:

The sudden silence of the menhebak trumpets on this forum is deafening. Junior’s murderous bungling has scared the Alawites in Syria more than it’s scared the opposition. There will be scant few Syrian houses that look fondly on his picture this evening.

July 31st, 2011, 1:19 pm

 

Aboud said:

What’s this? Junior sends his tanks and shabiha scum in against an unarmed population center, who *STILL* won’t be subdued? In your ass Athad, IN…YOUR…ASS!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-14356722

“By early evening, activists in Hama told the BBC that the city was quiet, and that the tanks had pulled out to the city’s perimeters after failing to gain control of the centre.”

“But our correspondent says the people of Hama remain defiant, with some still out in streets shouting: “We will not be killed again,” a reference to a massacre in 1982 when tens of thousands were killed.”

July 31st, 2011, 1:42 pm

 

N.Z. said:

No wonder Assadists were helping Qaddafi during the Libyan uprising!
Same devious aspirations. Same disregard to their people. Their ending will be similar.

I cannot wait for that day, were they all disappear from our radar screens in the same manner they appeared. I cannot comprehend their savagery. They are subhuman. Anger is raging. Everyone I spoke with is more determent to bring them down.

More than 140 Syrians killed by the followers of Assadism ideology

July 31st, 2011, 2:01 pm

 

Aboud said:

Omar Habbal, an activist in Hama, just confirmed to Al-Arabiya that the scum withdrew to the outskirts of the city.

So, all that junior managed to do was to get the entire country, and the world, pissed off at him. His scum did not manage to occupy the city, and the resolve of the army has been weakened. Numerous pictures of desertions flood the satellite channels.

Obviously, for the Besho Brigades to have pulled back from Hama, the defections must have been more widespread than the mebhebaks want to admit.

July 31st, 2011, 2:14 pm

 

abughassan said:

I need an answer from a person who is objective,well-informed and able to talk without using foul language because I am receiving mixed info from Hama:
what really happened for the situation to get to this point in the last 24 hours?
The two people I spoke to today gave a different story from what is being aired on aljazeera but it seems to me that the attack on Hama with such intensity is not justified,correct if I am wrong.
August may be “the make it or break it month”,let us hope that we get to where we want with minimum casualties.
(this is not the time to use sectarian language and paint people with a wide brush because of the religion of their parents,that is retarded and does not belong to the 21st century).

July 31st, 2011, 2:21 pm

 

Aboud said:

Abughassan, do your sources claim some “special circumstances” that called for tanks and anti-aircraft vehicles to be sent into an unarmed population center? Then what about Abukamal, Dayr el Zour and the other areas?

This was junior’s last gasp attempt to subdue some major centers of demonstrations and defections. It failed. Hama, Dayr el Zour and Abukamal live another day, and will continue to be thorns in his side, and sticks up his ass.

The Besho Brigades are really proving highly unreliable.

July 31st, 2011, 2:26 pm

 

hsyrian said:

Please find a photo from Hama showing a couple of armed people on a motorcycle.
IF genuine , it may explain that is happening NOW in Hama.
http://i.imgur.com/cpO0k.jpg

Disclaimers:
Discussing anonymous fabricated Youtube videos ( and anonymous photo ) is like building on quicksand.
Die Geschichte wiederholt sich, zuerst als Tragödie, dann als Farce.

July 31st, 2011, 2:36 pm

 

abughassan said:

aboud,why does the army need anti aircraft vehicles and tanks if it operates in an area without guns and bombs?
the regime knows that the world is watching and that Syrians are fed up with the regime brutality,I did not think they will try a failed tactic again,but hey,this is the Syrian regime !!
I disagree with anybody who wants to “assure” us that there are no arms in Hama but this does not mean we that we should allow tanks in the city.
the regime is using its last card but I am still unsure about what is next,like it or not,if this regime falls,and it will, we are left with the army for a while. Bashar must have received a green light from a “higher power” outside Syria to end this uprising,I know he is unable to escalate the situation on his own. mark my word,there is a deal in the making and something major will happen in August,many thinks it is the downfall of Bashar but I am not so sure,Damascus and Aleppo are mostly watching and their fasting will prolong the life of the regime.

July 31st, 2011, 2:43 pm

 

Syrian said:

I read all the comments and i don’t believe what i am reading, nobody is objective. many lies.
We all know that the Syrian regime is dirty but for sure the protesters are criminals, and terrorists. stop giving one side of the story. The result will be a civil war because these protesters tried from the start of the events to make troubles with other sects. a lot of fake news and fake videos are published. Muslim brotherhoods are the enemies of Syrian people

July 31st, 2011, 2:45 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Abughassan,

This is what my sources told me: “The reports out of Hama are horrifying and demonstrate the true character of the Syrian regime.”

However, please forgive for not revealing names, it is extremely sensitive and way up there.

A friendly reminder, the sectarian language is used only by the Assadists to ignite a civil war. Every lay person in Syria is aware of it. You do not have to be a rocket scientist, it is the common denominator among all those who want hegemony over a people and their resources.

July 31st, 2011, 2:50 pm

 

Aboud said:

SANA Spam-bot @132, from this point on I don’t care if you show a couple of guys on a motorbike carrying nuclear-tipped-shoulder-mounted-armagedon-surface-to-surface-bazookas. You disturb the bee-hive, don’t go crying if you get stung. The Syrian people have every right to arm themselves for defense.

Abughassan, you are right, why would the Besho Brigades need something like this in Hama

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZSU-23-4

Professor Landis, at present the Syrian people *do not care* about some temporary and too-easily resolvable shortcomings in some opposition conference. *Nothing* can be worse than this regime, and it is clear that the cost to remain living under it far outweighs the costs of getting rid of it.

Hama and Dayr el Zour have not been subdued, and the rest of the country has been angered like never before. As disastrous an outcome as Syria’s intervention in Black September in 1970, and which bought Papa Assad to power. Don’t be surprised if, after this bloody fiasco, someone takes advantage of junior’s increasing weakness.

July 31st, 2011, 3:16 pm

 

SANDRO LOEWE said:

Soon the photograps of Assad Junior will suffer skyrocketing rates on E-Bay internet shop. Menhebbaks and maminhebbaks try to collect as much photographs, clock with Hafez and Bashar images inside and other regime parafernalia. I have already collected one, I sell it for 1.000 $. Perfect state of conservation. Totally unburned.

July 31st, 2011, 4:00 pm

 

Norman said:

Apparently so far Damascus and Aleppo are the adults and the mature in Syria.

July 31st, 2011, 5:40 pm

 

aboali said:

#141 guess again buddy, people in Aleppo are livid with anger. Aleppo will explode in anger against the regime in Ramadan

protests in Aleppo after Taraweeh prayers

protests in Mazeh

protests in Midan

July 31st, 2011, 6:28 pm

 

aboali said:

why does Bashar use heavy artillery and weapons against civilians? because he’s ibn Kalb that’s why. This is so twisted it’s beyond words …..well maybe one, tfooh 3lek w 3ala anyone who still supports you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1pgrLN-cOw

oh and Aleppo has ignited, a protest in the rich neighborhood of Shahba jdedieh.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faWe7VAUvjA

Bashar the imbecile has managed to turn the whole world, and what was left of his support inside Syria against him in one bloody day full of mayhem and murder. This idiot is not fit to rule a lavatory, let alone a country as great as Syria.

July 31st, 2011, 6:49 pm

 

Aboud said:

Allahi hayeeeee shabab Halaaaaaab 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

July 31st, 2011, 6:50 pm

 

MNA said:

Dear all,

It is really surprising that most people are really astonished about what happened today in Hama. The opposition and the street coordinators have been promising the regime that Ramadan will be the month of its downfall. So what do you expect of this regime? To sit and wait for that moment to come. I have expected that the regime would go on a preemptive move to destablize the opposition. Would it work? Time will tell.

July 31st, 2011, 8:47 pm

 

Adam Neira said:

Prayers for Syria !

August 1st, 2011, 4:33 am

 

Ann Syla said:

MEET WASHINGTON’S FOREIGN-POLICY HYPOCRITES and DEMAGOGUES!

http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/meet-washingtons-foreign-policy-fools-5684

August 1st, 2011, 8:49 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

The defection videos are real. Defections had started since arly June with Lt.Col. Hussein Harmoush and others. The Men7ebek terrorosts who claim “120 soldiers killed by Salafosts in Jisr” – they were all defecting soldiers who were shot by the Shabiha and 4th Div. Col. Riad Moussa is not from the Army however….he’s from the Air Force, there is a vid on AlJazeera him in his Air Force uniform declaring defection. The uniforms these guys are wearing are new ones stitched exculsively for the FSA. There are at least 20 officers and 400 soldiers with FSA, I can assure you. And yes, they are not in Syria, probaly in Turkey while some are in Iraq and Northern Lebanon. You hear the sound of babies becoz most of these defectors are lodged in refugee camps and other hideouts.

And of BASHAR thinks he can stop the revolution by killing 150 ppl, he is mistaken. 150 ppl killed means 150 ppl less for a rally. Nothing more.

August 1st, 2011, 10:34 am

 

Amal Tlass said:

So, how’s the independent islamist Jihadist state of Hama doing today?

August 1st, 2011, 11:22 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

^ Mind to elaborate how Hama is “Islamist” or “Jihadist” ?

1. Have they started to impose ‘amr bil ma’arouf wannahi anil munkar ?

2. have they threatened to deploy suicide bombers ?

3. Have they given Jihadist slogans ?

If you don’t have the answer to these questions, then please shut up for the sake of secularism and nationalism at least.

Also I love it how these guys accuse the “Muslim Brotherhood” hand. LOL. I think there haven;t ben a single statement from the Ikhwan about the Syria protests in the last 5 months.

August 1st, 2011, 9:08 pm

 

Khalid Tlass said:

On the same note, how’s the independent Islamist Jihadist state of Hizbullah Lebanon doing today ?

August 2nd, 2011, 5:23 am

 

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