Should the US Hasten Assad’s Downfall Despite Syria’s Absence of Opposition Leaders?

I wrote this post on 5 August 2011, but never finished or posted it. I have just found it in my “drafts” and thought it worth publishing as a retrospective of the deep disagreement among analysts over US policy toward Syria during the first year of the Syrian Uprising.  (Joshua 14 Oct. 2020)

Should the US Hasten Assad’s Downfall Despite Syria’s Absence of Opposition Leaders?
By Joshua Landis
Syria Comment, August 5, 2011

Rami Nakhle in Lebanon

The Lack of a united leadership

Syria’s opposition does not have leaders. Rami Nakhle, a spokesman for the Local Coordination Committees, the most well known of the groups opposing the regime, told Deb Amos of NPR, “there is no national leadership, even behind the scenes.” This is a virtue and intentional he explains, “we are doing our best not really to have leaders.” Why? Because “the Syrian regime has targeted anyone who is seen as an organizer of the protests.” That is the practical reason.

A second reason is that Syrians don’t want leaders – “Everybody really feels anger towards leadership and authority on them,” says Nakhle.

Wissam Tarif reassures us that a new leadership for Syria will eventually emerge. It will emerge out of battle. It will emerge from the street. He explains, “There is an internal process, a process that is taking place in the street, which we will have to wait to see what happens there,” he said. “No one can control that. The real show is taking place on the ground with the protesters. And they will decide. No one else.”

How Does Syria’s Lack of Leaders Complicate US Planning?

The Syrian opposition’s lack of leaders has many US policy makers scared. They don’t want to bring down the regime before there is some structure or leadership to take its place. Syria’s silent majority is worried about a power vacuum developing in Syria as well. Who wants chaos? Iraq is fresh in everyone’s minds, not least of all in American policy planners’ minds. The quick toppling of the Iraqi regime brought militias and civil war. Much of Iraq that Saddam had failed to destroy was brought down by the waring militias and criminal gangs that took the army’s place. Most devastating, was the flight of Iraq’s upper and middle classes.

Because of this fear, a number of US think tankers, most recently Michael S. Doran and Salman Shaikh of the Saban Center at Brookings, are trying to think their way around the dangers. In an article, entitled Getting Serious in Syria, they argue that the US must play a leadership role in hastening the downfall of the Syrian regime. To avoid chaos and a vacuum they council the US to train, unit, and shape the Syrian opposition. It should also preserve the army. They don’t want an Iraq redux.

The main body of the article is quite smart and nails a number of regime characteristics. It is the recommendations that give pause. The main shortcoming of the article is that it skips any discussion of the opposition’s lack of leadership.

They are convinced that the sort of regime-led dialogue that Patrick Seale recommends is fruitless. In this, they are so far correct. But they tip-toe around Seale’s central concern, that Syrians are divided. Without unity, Syria is likely to end up like Iraq and not Egypt. Seale cautions, “a sectarian civil war on the Iraqi or Lebanese model is every Syrian’s nightmare. There must surely be another way out of the crisis.” He councils dialogue because he despairs of unity emerging among Syria’s nascent opposition anytime soon. In his two magisterial works, Seale catalogs the history of Syrian divisiveness and factionalism in the 20th century. Perhaps this is why he shares little of the sunny optimism expressed by Doran and Shaykh about coordinating Syria’s opposition. He writes:

If the regime has shown itself to be weak, the opposition is weaker still. It wants to challenge the system, but it evidently does not know how to proceed. It is split in a dozen ways between secularists, civil rights activists, democrats — and Islamists; between angry unemployed youths in the street and venerable figures of the opposition, hallowed by years in prison; between the opposition in Syria and the exiles abroad; between those who call for western intervention and those who reject any form of foreign interference.

Doran and Shaikh dismiss Seale’s caution and ignore Syria’s leaderlessness. This permits them to advocate speeding up regime-change. They explain that in order to save lives and ensure “the speediest rise of a new order hospitable to the United States,” the US should organize a “contact group” of friendly nations which will help in shaping the environment such that a power vacuum does not emerge in Syria when the regime falls. They advise that “The contact group should take all available steps to starve the regime of cash and other resources, including taking a leadership role on preventing the regime from generating revenue from oil exports.” On economic sanctions, they follow the Tabler and Monajed plan.

Their addition is the notion of an official “contact group” and that idea that the US can help form a transitional government out of Syria’s divisive opposition activists.

The United States must work with other key actors to help turn the Syrian opposition into the nucleus of a transition government. As the experience with the Libyan opposition forces has shown, engagement with the Syrian opposition movement would prove invaluable to increase its effectiveness and professionalize its efforts.

As for the Syrian Army, they write:

The United States must promote defections from the Syrian security services with an eye both to convincing Assad to leave and to preserving the Syrian Armed Forces as a future national institution. In doing so, Washington must warn officers, down to the brigade level, that they are being monitored and that they will be held personally accountable for the atrocities that are committed under their command. (This should not be a bluff.)

Can the US do this? Has it learned enough from its nation-building efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq to make the third time a charm? Or should the US pay heed to Wissam Tarif’s warning that the formation of an opposition leadership is an “internal process” that “no one can control?”

Randa Slim proposes a Doran lite sanctions scenario, aimed at convincing Syria’s business elite to dump Assad and embrace the revolution. In an article, entitled, “Where’s Syria’s business community?” She insists that Turkey must lead. The US is too tainted to assume dominance in the “contact group.” A close relationship with the Washington will delegitimize Syria’s opposition leaders in the eyes of Syrians.  The US and the West in general, she cautions, must leave a “lighter footprint.”

Slim is clear about one thing. Disunity among the opposition could doom the desire for regime-change. The absence of an opposition leadership is the major stumbling block preventing the Syrian business elite from ditching the Assads, she argues. The key to success for the revolution is getting Aleppo and Damascus to rise up with the people of Deraa and Jisr ash-Shaghour.

Syria’s Sunni Capitalists

Syrian businessmen are a conservative and self-interested lot. They have a refined disdain for peasants and tribesmen alike; neither are they big on leftists, philosophers, religious fanatics, or zealots of any stripe.  Indeed, Syria’s merchants and capitalists have rather high regard for themselves and few others. In their eyes, they are the true guardians of the Syrian nation. Their wisdom and moderation guided Syria to independence in the 1940s, avoiding sectarian bloodletting or humiliating foreign treaties. They bore with the Baathist mishandling of the economy, and spurned the Brotherhoods’ Jihadist pretensions in the 1980s. The only wisdom of the Assads, according to the Sunni elite, was their willingness to temper the nationalizations of the Nasserists, cut short the communism of the Jadidists, and most importantly take Syria’s capitalists seriously.

Before they will help overthrow the Assads, they need a safe alternative. They are not going to embrace, not to mention, fund a leaderless bunch of young activists who want to smash everything that smells of Baathist privilege, corruption and cronyism. After all, who are the CEOs of Syria’s crony capitalism if not the business elites of Aleppo and Damascus?

Only a five weeks ago, the head of Aleppo’s Chamber of Commerce, Faris Al-Shihabi, decried the return of socialist and communist ideas among the opposition. He warned:

We do not want this opposition to be molded by the left, which will be accompanied by lectures, theorizing and calamity for society and the economy. Steps to bring about reconciliation must be taken with the other sectors of civil society, particularly with national capital.  “لا نريد لهذه المعارضة أن تكون لها الصبغة اليسارية، التي تأتي بالتنظير والفلسفة والكوارث على المجتمع واقتصاده، ولا بد من إجراء المصالحة الداخلية مع القوى المدنية الأخرى وخصوصاً قوى رأس المال الوطني”.

Syria’s capitalists are not suicidal. They fear having their property expropriated twice in 50 years. Furthermore, they have become inextricably linked with the regime over the last 40 years, according to a number of analysts.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is correct in pointing out that change is up to the Syrians, and that the Syrian opposition must start laying out a credible transitional plan. The traditional Syrian business community must be convinced that there is a credible and viable political alternative to Assad. All they see now is an opposition that is either too old and disorganized and has tried to effect change and failed in the past or an opposition that is too young in the form of the Local Coordinating Committees whose faces and names are unknown to most and who are organizing and documenting the street protests. Different opposition groupings including the National Democratic Grouping, the Damascus Declaration signatories, the National Salvation Council, and the local Coordinating Committee have declared themselves, solidifying the image among this community of a disjointed opposition.

The formation of a transitional political council composed of the different groups now making up the Syrian opposition, Islamists and secular, old and young, groups based in Syria and exiles, will go a long way in promoting a shift in the Syrian businessman’s calculus. This council should elect a leadership, outline a detailed transition plan, and spell out a clear vision about the new social contract for how they want Syrians to live together and the type of economic system they want to see established. The lighter the footprint the international community has in this process, the more credible the outcome will be to the majority of Syrians and especially to the traditional merchant class, a nationalistic group that is suspicious of foreign, and especially U.S., intervention. There are many skilled Syrian political scientists, lawyers, and economists to do this job well without any outside assistance.

Fast-forwarding the Revolution may create a Frankenstein

Perhaps the US would be wiser to allow Syria to fill its own power vacuum? Once a united leadership emerges in Syria, it will be able to win the confidence of the majority and topple the regime on its own. There are dangers to short-circuiting that painful process. Doran and Shaikh argue that the US should hasten both the destruction of the old regime and construction of a new one – in short that it can nation build and help guide the emergence of a new Syria. This will save Syrian lives, they project, because it will prevent a drawn out battle.

But by helping to “fast forward” the Syrian revolution, the US could be creating a Frankenstein. If the opposition doesn’t have time to produce a leadership that emerges organically out of struggle, Syria may never unite. The US may cause more destruction and death, not less. To be truly success the opposition must come together under one set of leaders who win the confidence of the people by their intelligence, canniness, and most importantly, by their success.

Syrian Must Win the Revolution on its Own

As Haytham al-Maleh, the dean of Syria’s opposition leaders, said in urging Syrians to eschew foreign intervention: “If we want to own Syria after the revolution, we must win this struggle on our own.”

____

End Landis analysis

NEWS ROUND UP

Alain Gresh, Director of Le Monde Diplomatique returns from Hama he provides a video of his observations copied below
(in french) link

Interview Summary: Syrian no longer fear. They are expressing themselves. They see the regime’s deceptions. There is no going back to what was. Assad cannot beat this. Either there will be deep and meaningful reform or a long bloody war that may go on for months and months and take on a nasty sectarian aspect.

Very interesting video of a tribal meeting in Deir Ez-Zor, where several speakers support Jihad against the Army. Speakers agree that the regime does not know the meaning of peace or dialogue. They ask to coordinate with other cities, collect money from the cities and countryside, and to take the fight to the regime. Lots of old time religion.

Syrian Uprising Expands Despite Absence Of Leaders
Wednesday, August 03, 2011 NPR By Deborah Amos

Syria’s uprising has been called the YouTube Revolution. The protest videos from cities across the country are a guide to how the movement works.

The banners and the slogans are remarkably similar, from the city of Dera’a in the south, to Hama on the central plain, to the eastern desert town of Deir Ezzor. Even in the capital of Damascus, the chants are the same: “It’s time for President Bashar al-Assad to go.”

Yet there are no leaders directing the chants at these rallies. There is no national leadership, even behind the scenes, says Rami Nakhle, a spokesman for the Local Coordination Committees, the LCC, the most well known of the groups opposing the regime.

“Actually, we are doing our best not really to have leaders, because the classic leadership concept is really not working with this uprising,” said Nakhle, who is operating from Beirut in neighboring Lebanon.

The reasons are practical. The Syrian regime has targeted anyone who is seen as an organizer of the protests.

“If we name them, we are really putting them in grave danger,” said Nakhle.

But there is something even stronger at work, said Nakhle. This Syrian generation has grown up under an authoritarian system and distrusts any kind of leadership.

“If some leader or some person starts to behave as a leader, the crowd will knock him down,” he said. “Everybody really feels anger towards leadership and authority on them.”

The result is an uprising that appears improvised, locally based, and driven by young activists who are backed by large numbers of angry citizens.

“We don’t need anyone. It’s our freedom and we have to fight for it. We are not afraid,” said Mohammed Ali, an activist in Damascus who connects with other activists through Facebook.

Another Damascus-based activist, Amer Sadeq, uses an assumed name, and communicates in code on Internet sites. “You cannot trust anybody,” he said. “If you trust anybody and he makes a mistake, then you are detained, that means almost certain possibility that you will be tortured.”

While the groups in different cities are in touch through Internet chat sites, they can take a week to decide on the Friday slogan and tend to coordinate little else. They agree on ousting the Assad regime, but so far, there is no grand structure or strategy beyond keeping up the pressure on the street.

“It is a strategy,” says Rami Nakhle, “making it look to (President) Bashar al Assad that every day is worse than that day before and to keep pushing until something cracks.”

But as the international community distances itself from the Assad regime, one question has become more urgent: Who is the opposition and can get their act together?

“I think the international community wants a list, a list of 20 people whom they can check their background, and then they can talk with,” said Wissam Tarif, head of a Syrian human rights monitoring group. “Well, there is no list and there will not be a list.”

Political organizing is new for Syria, especially under an autocratic system that prohibits any meetings not sanctioned by regime.

“There is an internal process, a process that is taking place in the street, which we will have to wait to see what happens there,” he said. “No one can control that. The real show is taking place on the ground with the protesters. And they will decide. No one else.”

Still, some activists feel they need a transition plan that answers the crucial question: What next?

At a meeting in Beirut, Nakhle, one of the founders of the LCC, opens his laptop and explains a complex chart that he’s been working on for weeks. Every city has what he calls a central committee. There is an LCC parliament, and a list of “advisers.” For the first time, the grassroots movement is reaching out to Syria’s older generation of dissidents for help to map out a transition plan should the Assad regime fall.

It may look great on the screen, but Nakhle admits that less than half of it is actually in place.

“Today we are … playing with politics, we need to be more mature,” he said.

But the Syrian government is not playing at repression. And the protest movement may need to mature quickly in a country where the violence is growing greater by the day.

In Syria, Live Fire and Dueling Narratives
By J. DAVID GOODMAN, August 5, 2011

After seeking to impose a communications blackout on the besieged city of Hama, Syrian state television aired its own footage of rubble-strewn and deserted streets as evidence, it said, of a campaign to restore “normal life.”

BBC compiled video clips from the state news report, which described the images as new….

a Swiss radio journalist, Gaëtan Vannay, spent ten days in the city, managing to escape during the military onslaught sometime early this week.

He reported that before the tanks and troops moved in, the city was calm, calling government claims that the city had been overtaken by violent chaos “pure propaganda.”

“I did not hear any gunshots before the morning of the arrival of the government forces,” Mr. Vannay said in his report. He also confirmed that in general the video reports by activists in the city were an accurate representation of what was going on there….

Russia warns Syrian ruler he may face `sad fate’
VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV – 8/4/2011 7:08:38

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said Thursday he has warned Syria’s ruler that he will face a “sad fate” if he fails to introduce reforms in his country and open a peaceful dialogue with the opposition.

In remarks carried by Russian news agencies, Medvedev said he has delivered this message to Syrian President Bashar Assad.

An offensive by Syrian forces against anti-government dissent in the city of Hama, backed by tanks and snipers, has killed scores of people since Sunday.

“Regrettably, large numbers of people are dying there. That causes us grave concern,” Medvedev was quoted as saying.

“That’s why both on a personal level and in the letters I sent to him (Assad) I have emphasized that it’s necessary to urgently conduct reforms, negotiate with the opposition, restore civil peace, and create a modern state.”

“If he fails to do that, he will face a sad fate. And in the end we will also have to make some decisions. We are watching how the situation is developing. It’s changing, and our approach is changing as well.”

Economist: Bloodier Still

AT DAWN on the eve of Ramadan, the month of fasting that began on August 1st, President Bashar Assad sent tanks into Hama, the fourth-biggest city in the country. They fired at buildings from at least four directions. Soldiers and security forces with automatic rifles mowed down protesters carrying iron bars and rocks. They cut off electricity and communications. Amateur video footage showed columns of black smoke rising from the city of 800,000 as gunfire reverberated in the background. Pictures displayed mangled bodies, including one of a man run over by a tank. At least 100 civilians are reported to have been killed since the assault began.

It was the bloodiest episode since Syrians rose up five months ago. Since then, at least 2,000 people are reckoned to have been killed across the country, including 300 or so members of the security forces, some of whom were shot for defecting. At least 12,000 protesters are behind bars. The unrest shows no sign of dying down. Yet no one can say for sure how it will end.

Hama is not alone. The army and security forces have locked down Homs, the country’s third-biggest city, and Deir ez-Zor in the east, its fifth-biggest. Deraa, in the south, where the uprising began, is still under siege. Protests, albeit generally not on a big scale, continue to erupt in Damascus, including central districts such as Midan, just south of the old city, and in most of the surrounding suburbs and villages. Of Syria’s big cities, only Aleppo has been relatively quiet. Influential merchants there are watching and waiting.

The regime now seems determined to crush the street protests at all costs, while rallying support among its most loyal constituents: the Alawite minority of 10% to which Mr Assad belongs; the Christians (another 10%); the army; and the business class of Damascus and Aleppo, which has done quite well out of the Assad regime.

Western and Arab governments have plainly failed to persuade Mr Assad to change his ways or open meaningful talks with the protesters, though he held a fruitless “dialogue” which no genuine opposition figures attended. The Russians have altered their tone since the assault on Hama, calling Mr Assad’s use of force “unacceptable”. The European Union has increased the number of Syrians under sanctions. Turkey, a vital trading partner, has been increasingly critical. President Barack Obama is expected to call for Mr Assad to step down. Italy withdrew its ambassador. The UN Security Council finally issued a “presidential statement” which condemned the Syrian regime. All such gestures have so far been in vain.

Use the interactive “carousel” to browse all our coverage of Middle Eastern unrest through graphics

International options are limited. No one is seriously recommending military intervention. Arab governments have generally been silent, though the Saudis are keen to get rid of Mr Assad, since he is the closest Arab ally of Iran, whose power the Gulf Arabs would like to trim. The Americans want to boost the Syrian opposition, some of whose members recently met Hillary Clinton, the secretary of state, in Washington, DC. Economic sanctions may start to bite, but there is no hint yet that the regime is running short of cash to pay the army and security forces.

Some protesters say they should resort to violence. In towns such as Tel Kalakh, Jisr al-Shughour, Idleb and Deir ez-Zor, which are near the border, weapons are being smuggled in. But rifles and Molotov cocktails are no match for tanks and artillery. Other protesters hope that, if the regime becomes even more brutal, chunks of the army may defect, as they did in Libya. But so far the Alawite-led army, with its array of privileges, has remained loyal to the defiant Mr Assad.

Ambassador Ford

Fox: This week, when our ambassador to Syria dutifully responded as summoned to a hearing, only one senator bothered to show up.

Kuwait calls for dialogue to end Syrian crisis
2011-08-05

KUWAIT CITY, Aug. 5 (Xinhua) — Kuwait on Friday called for dialogue and political solution to end the crisis in Syria as Russia said NATO was planning a military campaign against Syria.

“Kuwait voiced sorrow for the continued bloodshed among citizens of the brotherly Syrian people”, a statement carried by the official KUNA news agency said.

The Foreign Ministry statement urged dialogue and political settlement to achieve a practical, political solution that could meet the aspirations of the Syrian people.

Lawmakers in the Gulf emirate have called on the Kuwaiti government to condemn the alleged crackdown and expel the Syrian ambassador.

The UN Security Council Wednesday adopted a presidential statement condemning the Syrian authority’s use of force against civilians and urged all parties to stop the violence.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Thursday endorsed the multi-party and general election laws, as part of reforms announced by him of late to meet the Syrian people’s demands.

UN Security Council Condemns Syrian Violence

….The U.N.’s most powerful body expressed “grave concern” at the deteriorating situation in Syria, …It was not easy for the Council to reach consensus.

The United States and European members had pressed for a resolution, which is stronger than the presidential statement that was adopted. But their efforts were blocked by Russia, China, India, Brazil and South Africa, who feared a resolution could lead to a similar situation as the one in Libya, where the Council authorized a no-fly zone and targeted bombings to protect anti-government protesters from attack by leader Moammar Gadhafi’s security forces….

In its statement, the Security Council condemned the “widespread violations of human rights and the use of force against civilians by the Syrian authorities.” The Council also called on the Syrian authorities “to fully respect human rights and to comply with their obligations under international law,” and warns that those responsible for the violence should be held accountable.

The Security Council also demanded the immediate end to all violence and urged restraint on both sides, including attacks against state institutions – a reference to violence committed by demonstrators and included to satisfy Russia and other members who felt blaming the government alone was unfair. But Western diplomats have stressed that one cannot equate what protesters have done in self-defense to what the government has perpetrated against its own people.

The Council also stressed that the only solution to the crisis is through an inclusive and Syrian-led political process that aims to “address the legitimate aspirations and concerns” of the Syrian people. And it notes that the Assad government has promised reforms, but has failed to make progress in implementing them and urged the government to fulfill its commitments.

But after the full council adopted the statement, Syria’s close ally and neighbor, Lebanon, employed a rarely used procedural loophole and “disassociated” itself from the statement…..

“Barbarous acts must cease in Syria,” said Lyall Grant. “The country must find its way onto a path of stability. This will only be achieved through the immediate cessation of violence and the implementation without delay of profound political reforms, respect of human rights and fundamental liberties, and genuine accountability for atrocities against protesters.”

The United States and European members had pressed for a resolution, which is stronger than the presidential statement that was adopted. But their efforts were blocked by Russia, China, India, Brazil and South Africa, who feared a resolution could lead to a similar situation as the one in Libya, where the Council authorized a no-fly zone and targeted bombings to protect anti-government protesters from attack by leader Moammar Gadhafi’s security forces

The Egyptian impasse raises a sobering question: whether a revolution can succeed without violence
July 31, 2011|By Thanassis Cambanis

CAIRO – When Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak resigned after 18 days of public demonstrations here last winter, Tahrir Square instantly took its place in the world’s iconography of peaceful protest. Young men and women brandishing nothing more lethal than shoes and placards had toppled a dictator. One subversive slogan – “The people want the fall of the regime” – in the mouths of a million people overpowered a merciless police state.

It was not bloodless; some 846 people were killed by police and regime thugs, according to an Egyptian government inquiry. But for the protesters, and for people watching around the world, Egypt’s uprising appeared a heartening entry in the history of successful nonviolent movements stretching from Gandhi and Martin Luther King to the “velvet revolutions” that unraveled the Iron Curtain in 1989.

That was half a year ago. Today, Mubarak’s military council runs the country, wielding even more power than before when it had to share authority with the president’s family and civilian inner circle. The military has detained thousands of people after secret trials, accused protesters of sedition, and issued only opaque directives about the country’s path toward a constitution and a new elected civilian government.

As time passes and revolutionary momentum fades in the broader public, a new current of thought is arising among the protesters who still occupy Tahrir Square, demanding civilian rule and accountability for former regime figures. Many are now asking an unsettling question: What if nonviolence isn’t the solution? What if it’s the problem?

“We have not yet had a true revolution,” said Ayman Abouzaid, a 25-year-old cardiologist who has taken part in every stage of the revolution so far. At the start, Abouzaid wholeheartedly embraced nonviolence, but now believes that only armed vigilante attacks will force the regime to purge the secret police and other operatives who still retain their jobs from the Mubarak era. “We need to take our rights with our own hands,” he says….

Velvet Or Violent: What Makes A Successful Revolution? – NPR – Hear and Now

Many have praised the non-violent protests that pushed Egyptian Hosni Mubarak from power this year. But some activists in Cairo’s Tahrir Square say the revolution hasn’t resulted in the democracy they wanted, and violence may be needed.

Thanassis Cambanis writes in the Boston Globe: “Among the dedicated core of Egyptian street activists who have been at the forefront of the protests since the beginning, an increasing number have begun to argue that a regime steeped in violence will only respond to force.”
Guests:

* Thanassis Cambanis, journalist and author of “A Privilege to Die: Inside Hezbollah’s Legions and Their Endless War Against Israel.”
* Mahmoud Salem, blogger known as Sand Monkey

NATO is planning military campaign against Syria: Russian envoy

MOSCOW, Aug. 5 (Xinhua) — Russia’s envoy to NATO, Dmitry Rogozin, said Friday that the alliance is planning a military campaign against Syria to overthrow the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, local media reported……

Russia has learned lessons from Libya and will continue to oppose “a forcible resolution of the situation in Syria,” Rogozin said. He added that the alliance is aiming to interfere only with the regimes “whose views do not coincide with those of the West.” The diplomat also warned that the “noose around Iran is tightening,” saying Moscow is seriously concerned about “an escalation of a large-scale war in this huge region.”

Syrian regime is doomed
Aug 4, 2011 18:32 Moscow Time

Interview with Georgy Mirsky, chief research fellow at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations at the Russian Academy of Sciences:

The regime is doomed, it is in deep crisis, and it is very difficult to imagine that it will last for very long. Nevertheless, in a short-term probably it will be able to cope with the situation, for a while at least. It is the end of the regime, but the agony may last for a certain period. So, the only way out is to continue to prolong this bloodshed until somebody loses its nerve, it is a war of nerves.

Now, Bashar al-Assad is not a strong leader; maybe the opposition reckons that sooner or later he will back down, but nobody knows what is going to happen. As to the next United Nations resolution, it is very strongly hardening on the sanctions, but how effective will it be? For instance, now to prohibit Syrian officials from going abroad is not very serious; economic sanctions in the matter of time will bring very hard pressure on the Syrian government, but it will take time.
end

also: Syria: Devil you know is better than devil you don’t
Laaska News April 29,2011

Georgy Mirsky, Chief Research Fellow at the Institute of World Economy and International relations:
…Of course we do not know yet the final outcome of the events in Syria. As to me, I would rather put my money on Bashar Assad.

I think he will drown the country in blood, but he will tough it out, because you know it all depends on the decisiveness and the brutality and ruthlessness of the armed forces, now you see the revolution in Syria is much alike all the other revolutions in the Arab world, it is part of one Arab revolution from the Atlantic ocean to the Persian Gulf, which by the way they call the Arab Gulf…..

Secretive Sect of the Rulers of Syria

2011-08-05, Christopher Howse, Sacred Mysteries: the strange religion of the Assad family….

It was the bloodiest episode since Syrians rose up five months ago. Since then, at least 2,000 people are reckoned to have been killed across the country, including 300 or so members of the security forces, some of whom were shot for defecting. At least 12,000 protesters are behind bars. The unrest shows no sign of dying down. Yet no one can say for sure how it will end.

Hama is not alone. The army and security forces have locked down Homs, the country’s third-biggest city, and Deir ez-Zor in the east, its fifth-biggest. Deraa, in the south, where the uprising began, is still under siege. Protests, albeit generally not on a big scale, continue to erupt in Damascus, including central districts such as Midan, just south of the old city, and in most of the surrounding suburbs and villages. Of Syria’s big cities, only Aleppo has been relatively quiet. Influential merchants there are watching and waiting.

Comments (458)


Norman said:

Well-armed lambs in Syria
News reports from Syria have been concentrating on the significant casualties (probably as many as a thousand) inflicted by Assad’s army on the city of Hama. But look at the opposition, which has targeted government troops with anti-tank rockets, sniper fire, heavy machine guns, and an abundance of light arms. The latest reliable figure from August 1 show some 130 Syrians dead in Hama, which is a far cry from the ‘indiscriminate shelling’ depicted by Western media.

After thus arming the opposition and inciting it to fight Assad, the White House shares responsibility with Assad for the body count.

04 August 2011 Syria 0diggsdigg

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August 5th, 2011, 6:50 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

لأنهم رفضوا إطلاق النار على المتظاهرين
مفوضية الأمم المتحدة: إيران وحزب الله متورّطان في قتل الجنود السوريين
http://www.alarabiya.net/save_print.php?print=1&cont_id=160985
دبي – موسى الشريفي
أعلنت لجنة تابعة للمفوضية العليا لشؤون اللاجئين التابعة للأمم المتحدة الجمعة أن إيران وحزب الله متورّطان في قتل الجنود السوريين الرافضين لإطلاق النار على المتظاهرين، حسب ما نقلته الإذاعة الفرنسية. وأعلنت اللجنة أنها ستنشر تقريراً مفصلاً من 20 صفحة في الأيام القادمة، يشتمل على صور وشهادات لاجئين وجنود منشقين عن النظام السوري، يتواجدون الآن على الحدود التركية. ويؤكد التقرير أن الجنود السوريين الذين رفضوا إطلاق النار على المتظاهرين قتلوا بعد اعتقالهم على يد عناصر تنتمي إلى حزب الله اللبناني أو قوات إيرانية تابعة للحرس الثوري المتواجدين في سوريا لمساعدة النظام السوري في قمعه للمتظاهرين.

ويعد هذا التقرير الأول من نوعه الذي يتهم إيران وحزب الله علناً بتورطهما في إعدام الجنود السوريين، الذين يرفضون إطلاق النار على المتظاهرين من أبناء شعبهم.

وكانت مصادر غربية أكدت سابقاً تورّط إيران وحزب الله في قمع المتظاهرين السوريين ولكن حزب الله وإيران رفضا الاتهام.

يُذكر أن العلاقات بين دمشق وطهران وحزب الله تطورت خلال ثلاث عقود في كافة المجالات العسكرية والأمنية والاقتصادية، وتربط هذا الثالوث منظومة من التحالفات.
وفي ما يخص أحداث سوريا فقد كان الموقف الايراني منذ البداية منحازاً للرئيس بشار الاسد وظهر ذلك جلياً في خطاب المسؤولين الايرانيين، وعلى رأسهم المرشد الأعلى علي خامنئي الذي وصف في كلمة له في وقت سابق من الشهر الماضي الأحداث التي شهدتها البحرين في ميدان اللؤلؤة بأنها عادلة، في حين اعتبر الاحتجاجات المستمرة في سوريا ضد الرئيس بشار الأسد منحرفة، مؤكداً أن إيران لن تدافع عنها.

كما اعتبر الثورة السورية نسخة مزيفة عن الثورات في مصر وتونس واليمن وليبيا، متهماً الولايات المتحدة الأمريكية بصنع هذه النسخة بغية إيجاد خلل في “جبهة الممانعة”، حسب تعبيره، زاعماً أن فحوى أحداث سوريا تختلف عن مثيلاتها في المنطقة.

كما كان للسيد حسن نصر الله، أمين عام حزب الله، موقفاً مشابهاً لموقف خامنئي في حديثه المتلفز الذي تناول فيه الأحداث في كل من سوريا ولبنان.

August 5th, 2011, 7:00 pm

 

Tara said:

Aboud

Allah yahmikum. I heard Baba Amr Is on fire and there is a lot of defections in Homs.

August 5th, 2011, 7:08 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

“The latest reliable figure from August 1 show some 130 Syrians dead in Hama, which is a far cry from the ‘indiscriminate shelling’ depicted by Western media.”

Oh! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

130 Syrians murdered in one day by the army of “resistance” is peanuts. We should be very thankful. Obviously, the ??? of wounded and the destroyed, damaged, or stolen property is nothing to talk about. They only made one mistake. Not allowing the media to freely report the army’s invasion of Hama and prove the hypocritical Western media wrong.

August 5th, 2011, 7:09 pm

 

Aboud said:

Norman

“But look at the opposition, which has targeted government troops with anti-tank rockets, sniper fire, heavy machine guns, and an abundance of light arms”

And yet not even Al-DUHnya has provided one image of a burnt out tank or APC.

Tara, there was alot of gunfire all over Homs between 10pm and 1am. I think only Al-Wa3r was spared. Speaking of which, how come Syrian State TV and Al-DUHnya haven’t shown us the military academy there yet.

August 5th, 2011, 7:33 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

ضربتان موجعتان للنظام السوري
رأي القدس
2011-08-05

ضربتان موجعتان جرى توجيههما بالامس الى الرئيس السوري بشار الاسد الاولى من رئيس الوزراء الروسي فلاديمير بوتين والثانية من الشاعر السوري المعروف ادونيس، وكل منهما له اهمية خاصة ليس من حيث التأثير وانما ايضا من حيث النظرة الى تطورات الاوضاع في سورية.
الرئيس بوتين الذي تقيم بلاده علاقات وثيقة مع النظام السوري، وتحتفظ بقاعدة عسكرية ضخمة في ميناء طرطوس هي الاضخم في المنطقة، قال ان الرئيس بشار باستخدامه المفرط للقوة لقمع المظاهرات الاحتجاجية يسير في طريق محفوف بالمخاطر. اما الشاعر ادونيس الذي اتخذ موقفاً متحفظاً في الاشهر الاولى من انفجار الاحتجاجات المطالبة بالتغيير فقد خرج عن تحفظه هذا وطالب الرئيس بشار الاسد بالاستقالة، وذلك في حديث ادلى به الى صحيفة ‘الرأي’ الكويتية.
واللافت ان موقف رئيس الوزراء الروسي الانتقادي للرئيس السوري يأتي بعد موافقة بلاده على بيان اصدره مجلس الامن الدولي يدين بشدة القمع الدموي للمتظاهرين السوريين، مما يعني ان اقرب حلفائه باتوا يشعرون بالحرج الكبير من جراء هذا القمع، والاصرار على الحلول الامنية.
لا نعتقد ان النظام يعير اي اهتمام لمثل هذه الانتقادات او غيرها مهما كان مصدرها، ويتضح ذلك من خلال ازدياد وتيرة القتل يوماً بعد يوم، فقد سقط بالامس عشرة اشخاص على الاقل برصاص قوات الامن التي اطلقت النار على المتظاهرين في ريف دمشق ومدينةي حماة وحمص، بينما نزح الآلاف من مدينة دير الزور تحسباً لوقوع هجوم للجيش السوري على غرار ما حدث في مدينة حماة من مجازر نتيجة هجوم مماثل اوقع اكثر من مئة شهيد في يوم واحد الاسبوع الماضي.
من الواضح ان هناك اصراراً على التمسك بخيار القوة الامنية كمخرج من هذه الازمة مهما بلغ عدد الضحايا في اوساط المحتجين. فالنظام في سورية لا يريد ان يتخيل ان هناك معارضة لسياساته وطريقة ادارته للبلاد، لانه لم يتعود على وجود مثل هذه المعارضة، وان وجدت فعلا فان مكانها اما القبور او اقبية زنازين التعذيب في المعتقلات.
النظام السوري لا يريد تقديم تنازلات لشعبه، ربما لانه لا يعترف بحقه في الديمقراطية والعدالة والعيــــش الكريم، ويريد ان تستمر الامور كما سارت عليه طوال الاعوام الاربعين الماضية، اي تغول من قبل النظام واجهزته الامنية وخنوع كامل للمواطنين.
معادلة الخنوع هذه انهارت في اليوم الاول الذي كسر فيه ابناء مدينة درعا حاجز الخوف، واطلقوا شرارة الانتفاضة قبل ستة اشهر تقريباً، لتنتشر في مختلف محافظات البلاد طولاً وعرضاً. ولكن النظام، وبعض رجالاته البارزين، خاصة في الحلقة الامنية الضيقة، لا يريد ان يسلم بهذا الانهيار، ويتصرف كما لو انه غير موجود على الاطلاق.
صرخة الشاعر ادونيس لها مدلولات كبيرة لما يتمتع به الرجل من مكانة ادبية رفيعة ومصداقية كبيرة داخل سورية وفي اوساط النخبة المثقفة في الوطن العربي، ولذلك ما كان ليطلقها، وبمثل هذا الوضوح، لولا انه لم يعد يتحمل ممارسات النظام الدموية في حق شعبه.
فالرئيس بشار الاسد الذي يقف على رأس النظام هو الذي يتحمل المسؤولية الاكبر عما يجري في البلاد من سفك للدماء وبصورة يومية، ولهذا طالبه الشاعر الكبير بالاستقالة طالما انه لا يستطيع ان يقدم الاصلاحات التي يطالب بها الشعب السوري.
النظام السوري لا يستطيع تأكيد هيبته بالقتل والمزيد منه وانما من خلال نيل احترام شعبه او الغالبية العظمى منه، والامر المؤكد ان التغول في سفك الدماء سيفقده الكثير من هذا الاحترام، الى جانب الكثير من الحلفاء داخل سورية وخارجها.
http://www.alquds.co.uk/index.asp?fname=today5qpt999.htm&arc=data\201188-055qpt999.htm

August 5th, 2011, 7:34 pm

 

uzair8 said:

Aboud and co. keep up the good work. Much appreciated.

To my point. Did the Bahrain government miss a trick by not using the ‘armed gang’ story? Gaddafi had his own story. ‘Drug induced youth’, Nescafe etc.

The Syrian regime had its story prepared. However the people and the world havent fallen for the lies as they had seen how Mubarak, Gaddafi and co lied about events.

August 5th, 2011, 8:39 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Adonis,or Ali Ahmad Sa’eed Isber, is a prominent figure in philosophy and literature as most of you know. The guy,from a known alawi family in Jabla-Latakia,was always opposed to albaath and Islamist political movements. He called on Alasad to resign but added that he is opposed to an Islamist regime replacing the one syria has now and admitted that the leftist and secular movements in Syria are weak and disorganized. The second part of Adonis opinion mysteriously disappeared from al-quds article.

August 5th, 2011, 9:02 pm

 

beaware said:

Turkey urges Syria to heed advice and stop violence
Friday, August 5, 2011
ANKARA- Hürriyet Daily News
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=turkey-urges-syria-to-heed-advice-and-stop-violence-2011-08-05
Syria should heed the advice given by Ankara and other members of the international community and stop committing violence against its own people, Turkey said Friday.

“The method [in responding to protests] and its timing are wrong,” Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu told reporters Friday, underlining that military operations in the Syrian city of Hama were illegitimate.

Syrian security forces have reportedly killed dozens of people in Hama and residential areas on the Lebanese border since the beginning of Ramadan on Monday.

Turkey’s reaction against Syria, which had been a close regional ally, has been harsh and included heavy-worded statements describing the operations as atrocities.

“We are monitoring [the developments] very closely and working on steps to be taken [by Syria],” Davutoğlu said, urging Syria’s leadership to cease its violence against protesters and heed messages from the international community more seriously.

Despite growing concerns of instability in the country, Davutoğlu said Turkey would not shut down or evacuate its embassy in Damascus.

The uprising, which began in mid-March, was inspired by the revolutions sweeping the Arab world. Reform steps taken by the administration of President Bashar al-Assad have not been seen as sufficient by either protesters or the international community.

August 5th, 2011, 9:16 pm

 

Jad said:

متى ستتحول حركة الاحتجاجات الى ثورة حقيقية؟
George Zeitoun 
تحية طيبة وبعد،
قبل أن ابدأ الحديث وقبل أن يأخذ اي شخص أي توجه من مقالتي اريد التنويه الى ما اقوم بنشره ليس فقط وجهة نظري الشخصية بل أيضا مجموعة من الأفكار التي اقتبستها عبر تواصلي المستمر مع اصدقاء واشخاص من مختلف الإتجاهات، وحيث اني قمت ببلورة هذه الأفكار وطرحها بأقصى حدود الموضوعية الممكنة.
 
بداية يوجد دائما سؤال يجول فضاء اذهان شريحة كبيرة الا هو هل ما يحصل في سوريا هو ثورة ؟
في مناسبات سابقة ذكرت ضمن احدى مقالاتي وجهة نظري حول هذه النقطة وسأختصر المسافات واسرد ملخص الموضوع، ان كنا نريد ان نقارن ما يحصل في سوريا اليوم وما حصل من ثورات عبر التاريخ فنحن سنجد اختلافات شاسعة وتباين من حيث الفكر الثوري، والايدولوجيات والمقومات للثورة فيما يحصل في سوريا الان و ما حصل في التاريخ، لا يمكن من هذا المنطلق ان تجد الثورة الحالية اي موقع لها تحت بنود الثورات ولكن أيضا لا يمكننا ان ننكر ما حصل في سوريا هو ثورة على أفكارنا بالحد الأدنى لنتغير بشكل جوهري وننتقل الى مراحل جديدة في حياتنا، فإذا ما يحصل في سوريا الان ليس ثورة بالمعنى الكامل وانما ثورة من نوع جديد.
 
ولكن المشكلة الحقيقية هي عدم انضمام الشريحة الأكبر من الشعب وانا من ضمنهم لهذا الحراك لكم هائل من الأسباب اهمها لا وجود لقيادات عامة توجه الثورة ضمن اتجاه واحد، البعض سيقول الان ان السبب هو الامن وقمعه للمظاهرات…..4 اشهر من الاحتجاجات وحتى ضمن القمع كافية لتكوين قيادة للمتظاهرين في سوريا وتوجد في الحقيقية قيادات ولكن على مستوى المدن أو الأحياء ولكنها لا تعبر بشكل كامل عن كافة اراء الشريحة المتظاهرة، ان كنتم لا تريدون اظهار هذه القيادات خوفا من الاعتقال اذن اين هو نضالكم؟ هل تنتظرون ان يستسلم النظام فقط لخروجكم ببعض المظاهرات المبعثرة ؟، من يختبئ خلف اللثام وهو يعتبر نفس مناضلا ليس قائدا شجاعا ان كنت تؤمن بقضيتك فعلا وتريد اسقاط النظام وهو الشعار الأكثر توحدا بين المتظاهرين فعليك ان تثبت وجودك بقوة على الأرض بشكل منسق وسلمي حقيقي ولا تدع  لأي متطرف ان يمثلك وان يكون هو مثالك في التظاهر.
 
وبمناسبة الحديث عن الشعارات وهو مأخذي الثاني انتم تجعلون الأقليات تنفر منكم وتضعونها بخانة الأعداء، حراككم يخيف افراد الشعب ولا يشعرهم بالطمئنينة، كيف ستكسبون الشعب وهناك تشرذم في افكاركم وطرحكم؟ وخاصة بطرح عدد من الشعارات الطائفية والسباب، اين هي اسماء الجمع الوطنية؟ متى ستخرجون من امام السرايا؟ لا تريدون اي معارضة لتمثلكم وانتم لا تمثلون انفسكم، لا يمكن للنظام ان يعترف بكم وانتم بهذه الحالة، اين هو المستقبل من بعد حكمكم؟ اين هي البدائل الوطنية المطروحة؟ اين هو برنامجكم؟
 
ثم من قال ان اقتصاد سوريا هو اقتصاد النظام؟ ان اضراب المحلات يعود بالضرر بالدرجة الأولى على الشعب وبالدرجة الثانية على النظام الذي سيحكم بعد اسقاط النظام ان حصل، كم من الوقت والمجهود تحتاجه وكم من الديون عليك اخدها الى العودة الى ما قبل 15 اذار ان سقط النظام اقتصاديا؟  انت تسحب اموالك من البنوك الحتى غير حكومية، تحول عملة بلدك الى الدولار، من المتئذي المباشر الأول غير المؤوسسات واصحاب الشركات؟ عدم دفع الفواتير والضرائب وان تضع الدولة وكل شعبها بحافة انهيار اقتصادي يزيد من حالة الفقر في سوريا الى نسب عالية، ان النظام لديه امواله ويستطيع الهروب الى الخارج في اي لحظة ويمكنه العيش مئات السنين هناك، من يفكر لحظة ان هذا من صالح البلد فهو مخطئ جدا.
 
دعوني ارى النور في ثورتكم حتى اتبعكم وحتى يتبعكم باقي الشعب، دعونا نسقط النظام سويا بشكل حقيقي وديمقراطي واهلي سلمي حتى ننتقل بشكل صحيح الى سوريا حرة ديمقراطية موحدّة لا سوريا مشرذمة ساقطة منهارة.

August 5th, 2011, 9:22 pm

 

Gus said:

It does not look like the USA are going to learn from their mistakes. The Syrians are paying the price from all sides and we might end up with a much worst regime run by terrorists and fanatics.
Whoever support outside interferences is a traitor and he has deficit in his morals, intelligence or both.

August 5th, 2011, 9:24 pm

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: NORMAN

RE: “…the White House shares responsibility with Assad for the body count…”

Good one, Norm. The blame game continues. Sorry to disappoint you, but the USA is not arming the protestors. Certainly, when a protestor falls down, we help him up, dust him off and wish him “Godspeed,” but he has to find his own gun. Which isn’t hard. There’s a Lebanese fellow named Hariri whose fondest wish is to see Besho dead. I understand Saad’s a billionaire and rumor has it he’s shipping guns to anyone in Syria who wants them.

Saad Hariri is just one of many. The Assads over the past 40 years have been particularly adept at making enemies. I’m sure there’s a slew of people throughout the Middle East who’ve been holding grudges and waiting their chance to even the score.

Sure, it’s convenient to blame the CIA and the Mossad. It’s also a lazy man’s easy way out. Because the real dangers are a lot closer to home.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Dale_Andersen/syrian-protests-hama-bombed_n_919147_101174988.html

August 5th, 2011, 9:30 pm

 

majedkhaldoon said:

How could the syrian revolution get one leader, Syria is made of different sects, Sunni leader may not be accepted by Alawite,kurdish leader may not be accepted by arab,and so on, during 1925 revolution we had several leaders, but we are bound to have raw Bands, each with a leader.
The longer this revolution takes the more likely there will be secret groups, who will get arms and will engage in assasination of people in power.
I do not think Russia can afford to be completely on Bashar side, if the regime changed Russia stands to loose a lot.in the post assad period,Syria will be in grave financial situation,they will need Saudia Arabia help.power vaccum can not be avoided in Syria.

August 5th, 2011, 9:35 pm

 

beaware said:

Syrian struggle: view from the ground
Published: 03 August, 2011, 12:52 Edited: 04 August, 2011, 15:14
http://rt.com/news/syria-hama-struggle-interview/

While world powers are split on whether to support the Syrian government or the opposition, RT’s sister channel Rusiya Al-Yaum’s correspondent Marianna Belenkaya traveled to Syria to see what is happening in the protest-torn country.
At some point, one can easily lose track amid the news from Syria – what to believe, what is right, and what is not. The Syrian Diaspora in Moscow (and perhaps not just in Moscow alone) was split apart; so in order to understand what really was going on, we went to the scene.

But once you get to Syria, it does not get any easier – all stories are very subjective, and depend on who you talk to at the moment. All people share their own truths, their beliefs, and their impressions.

I do not claim to be objective. This text is my impressions from the trip, and from meeting the people that the circumstances brought to me. Perhaps, had there been different people, my impressions would have been different.

I changed or left out their names for safety reasons. In a country where the word “freedom” has no meaning anymore, the army is not the only one that kills – so do those who call themselves the opposition. They kill those who dare to think and act differently from everyone around them.
Story one
Salam, 41 (journalist, Damascus)

“I was unable to reach my mother and brother in Daraa by phone for three weeks. A military operation was deployed there, so telephones were out of service. Then I managed to call them and to travel there. Eventually I learned that the first person killed in Daraa was my best friend. He worked as a night guard at a store. When servicemen entered the city they told him: ‘You’ll be the first one who we kill in Daraa.’ His body was lying in the store for several days. People were unable to leave their homes to bury their dead. My brother will remember for the rest of his life seeing two old ladies dragging a stiffened corpse. They were walking slowly carrying a broom with a while cloth over it, from one checkpoint to another.”
­Story two

­Hasan, 31 (doctor, Damascus)

“You should’ve seen the wounds of those brought to the hospital – snipers’ bullets, and grenade shrapnel. Don’t believe those who say that the army shoots the unarmed. Also, they brought wounded protestors, including a large number of young, 15-16-year-old boys. When you try giving them painkillers, they struggle in your arms and just scream ‘Allah akbar’ or ‘They’re killing us’. When you try talking to them, telling them ‘I’m your older brother’, they don’t want to listen. What alternative to Assad does the opposition propose? So far they can only propose a civil war. Is it really a democracy when servicemen’s bodies get cut into pieces and then put into bags with words ‘Alawi meat – dog food’ on them? Is this really a democracy, with slogans ‘Christians to Beirut, Alawis to graves’?”
­Story three

­Hisam, 30 (director, lives in a small town 10 minutes’ drive from Damascus)

“I was among the first ones to go to rallies, and I welcomed the reforms. But when shooting started in my town (and it wasn’t the army shooting but rather the oppositionists and Assad’s supporters shooting each other). I left the streets. Let the tanks raze to the ground those who stir up inter-religious strife whoever they may be, oppositionists or regime supporters. The events in Syria are a performance in which each party is wearing a mask and playing a rehearsed role. People don’t understand what freedom is. For them, freedom means doing whatever they want at any time.”
­Story four

Michel, 20 (internet café worker, Lattakia)

“We don’t believe media anymore. They all take just one side of the conflict. We established our own news network on Facebook. In each city, voluntary reporters tell about the local situations. They report whether there are rallies and clashes, they post their videos, and organize campaigns to support the president. But people don’t want to hear us, or rather, they believe we’re forced to do this. It’s not true. See, the guys in Homs just posted a video on YouTube showing a town welcoming the tanks with flowers. But it’s unlikely that large media will show this.”
­Story five

­Ahmed, 65 (owner of a café in the mountains, near Jisr ash-Shugur)

“It’s easy to stir religious strife even in places where it has never happened before. Not far from here, three villages are located, a Christian one, a Sunni one, and an Alawi one. In the Sunni village, a guy and a girl were killed. The bodies were left lying in the streets. And then they started calling the village residents saying, ‘Aren’t you men? Why don’t you avenge the murders?’ The locals say the callers sounded like residents of Hama, the heart of the opposition. And not a word was said, whether to confirm or deny – who called, and who murdered.”
­Hama

­In Hama itself, and not just there, they state that the opposition has nothing to do with the escalation of the inter-religious conflict, and that all provocations are initiated by the regime which would benefit from showing that there is no alternative to it.

“We really don’t hate people of other faiths! The other day, our Christian neighbors came over to check whether their property was safe. We invited them over for tea and chat,” say residents of a Hama district, pointing at a nailed-up house nearby.

They promise to vote for an Alawi at the upcoming election in Syria, provided his program is more sensible than that of a Sunni candidate. They are even willing to vote for President Assad if he proves to be a real reformer.

For these people in the streets, the regime primarily means a large Syrian “war machine”, or the internal structures that prevent them from breathing freely, rather than Assad himself.

But there are those in Hama who support Assad in spite of the threat of losing their jobs or even lives. “I am for reforms, but along with President Assad,” says a young Christian lady with tears in her eyes. And there is so much despair and anguish in her eyes that I just feel like taking her away from Hama.

She cannot leave the city by herself, as the public transport does not operate there anymore; what is more, she has to care for her parents, and she still has a job. Many Christians and Alawis have left the city. Entire districts have been deserted.

Hama, the island of “freedom”

We arrived at Hama several days before the servicemen’s entry to the city. The city had lived on its own for about a month – no army, no police, no representatives of the authorities. Such a peculiar island of freedom where nobody knew what would happen next. But everyone realized that this status quo could not last forever. Hama’s residents were preparing to fight till the very last drop of their blood. Most of them had nothing to lose. The Syrian security force had a list of the unrest instigators, about 4,000 people. The locals later said over the phone that these people were the ones they chased after. But that was two days later, when we had left.

Imagine a city where buyers in the streets set their own prices for goods, and dictate their own conditions to sellers. When shop owners disagree, they burn down their shops, or give away all goods to the locals. Other words, they rob in the name of freedom and justice. A city where citizens refuse to pay taxes and utilities, or to repay debts for goods to their trade partners who support the regime. They give weird looks to those who try supporting a different view, or burn their cars; as a result, people do not dare speak up anymore. Freedom should only meet the demands of those in charge of one district or another.

It is easy to get to the city by public transport, whereas traveling inside it is difficult. They immediately spot strangers in Hama. You cannot openly see weapons in the streets, except for perhaps knives of checkpoint guards. But they do not conceal the fact that they do have means of resistance.

The city is divided into districts, and one cannot drive from one district to another at night. However one cannot reach some districts even at daytime, as roads are blocked off, and the locals do not advise walking there either. In particular, the district under control of Salafi Sheikh al-Aroor, who promotes massacre and whose slogans are compared to those of Bin Laden.

“With me you’re safe,” Abu Nidal, a city local who was accompanying us kept saying. But then he would immediately correct himself that he would not speak for the entire district.

Abu Nidal is a bank executive, far from being a lowly figure in Hama. He admits that he could have waited out the unrest at home smoking his water pipe. But he still decided to actively participate in the life of his home city. He said that the permanent humiliation of human dignity on the part of the authorities pushed him toward the opposition. He believes that the authorities do not need smart independent people; to the contrary, they try to get rid of them as soon as they reach a certain level in their career. Whereas the true owner of the country is the mechanism of force, which is allowed to do everything.

Abu Nidal’s brother, also a banker, shares the same opinion. He worked abroad for a long time, but then he returned “to serve his country”.

Our conversation with them leaves an impression that both brothers are willing to look for a compromise with the authorities, but they are staying in the city in order to preserve everything they own, and to try and find common ground with those of extreme positions among the “revolutionaries”. However, these attempts have not been successful at street level (they burned out the car of one of the brothers following his attempts to persuade the citizens to improve the life of the city and to look for compromise), as well as the higher level of the city elite. During the month of freedom, those in charge of Hama’s life never managed to agree on what to do and where to go, as each of them had their own limit line that they could not cross. And Assad did not manage to agree with Hama either – several times, the city’s “respected individuals” came over to see him, but a solution was never found.

Perhaps, had the president and his ministers visited Hama themselves and met the people on the streets, the situation would have changed. Those citizens who agreed to talk to us were hurt that they, unlike the local elite, were not invited to join the dialogue. “Nobody is still willing to talk to commoners! What reforms can Assad talk about then?” they complained. And immediately, they asked: “Look at us, do we look like criminals the way we’re portrayed on official TV?” No, they do not. They rather look like hostages. Hostage to this situation.

“We cannot see any light at the end of the tunnel,” said Abu Nidal as a good-bye.

­Marianna Belenkaya, RT

August 5th, 2011, 9:38 pm

 

Tara said:

Dale

You accused Syrians of hating everybody. Not exactly correct. We like the Egyptians. They marched today in support of the Arab spring and in particular in support of the Syrian people struggle against the dictator. They started their march in front of the Syrian embassy in Cairo. I always liked Egyptians…

August 5th, 2011, 9:41 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Since I talked enough and was bruised enough,it is time for me to learn more from you. This forum is by far the most influential and looked-at blog on Syria today,excluding Facebook which is a unique animal with more users but less depth. Asad may or may not resign,my guess is that he will not. The army may or may not get divided,my guess again is that it will not.
Foreign intervention is possible but unlikely.
Support from minorities and business class to this uprising may emerge but that is a “big may” (some suggested that this support is not needed).
How do you think this crisis will end without a civil war? And when are we likely to start seeing a unifying opposition figure or an organized movement that can force a political change in Syria aside from Islamist parties? Again,some indicated that an Islamic political party is the only viable alternative today,but how the hundred of thousands of army officers and security officers will respond?
The situation today may offer more questions than answers,and I am eager to hear your voice before I pack and go to do what I do best: give and learn..

August 5th, 2011, 9:59 pm

 

Sheila said:

Yeah… The Russians are very well known for their independent media.!!!!!!!!!!!!
Remember the reporter who was killed mafia style becuase she was investigating the Chenchneya fiasco?????

August 5th, 2011, 10:07 pm

 

Haytham Khoury said:

We should finish from this story that the Syrians hate every one. This is not true. I live in Canada. I love this country very much. I am physician. I always think about my patients day and night. I love my patient. What is amazing that my patients are from more than 15 different nationalities. one day I wrote to a friend of mine:

“The second rule here is that we all serve the system that we work in. For example, for me I have two main systems that I should serve: the hospital that I work in (Princess Margaret) and the Country that I live in (Canada). If anybody does not serve that system that he or she is in, that person isolate himself or self systematically. The person that does not serve the system will be slowly slowly pushed out. (By the way, I am citizen of three countries: France, Canada and Syria). I am very active in the Canadian political life and I am still relatively active in the French one.”

August 5th, 2011, 10:13 pm

 

Sheila said:

# 16
No one really has the answer to your question. All we can do is speculate.
I think that this government will crack. It is under so much pressure. The families of these thugs are worried and uncomfortable. They are not used to this. Plus, they can not go out of the country anymore.
I think the crack will happen all of a sudden and will come as a surprise to all of us. And then ” akel alhawa” starts. Now we are in the honeymoon period. When the regime collapses, it will be hell. Unfortunately, Syria has no other options. This cancer has to be removed for the rest of the body to survive. We have to go through Chimo and radation therapies and wish we still had the cancer because it was more comfortable back then, until we hopefully, fully recover and are back to being a normal nation.
Abughassan, let us all pray for Syria.

August 5th, 2011, 10:18 pm

 

beaware said:

Bashar Assad maneuvers to avoid sanctions
Aug 5, 2011 15:20 Moscow Time
http://english.ruvr.ru/2011/08/05/54241955.html
The Syrian President continues to maneuver to keep the reins of power and avoid international sanctions. With Syria balancing on the brink of civil, there is hardly anything else he can do. The country desperately needs reforms. Yesterday, President Assad decreed a multi-party system, and earlier he allowed to issue passports to Kurds and carried out a cabinet reshuffle.

The time to begin reforms is long overdue. Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said as much in his Wednesday’s interview for the Russia Today television, the Ekho Moskvy radio and the First Caucasian News Channel. He said that in his personal letters to President Assad, he repeatedly urged him to launch reforms, reconcile with the opposition, restore civil peace and build a modern state. If he fails to do this, he is doomed, the Russian leader said.

Naturally, it takes time to effect reforms. Yet, despite the urgency of the matter, Bashar Assad has been too slow to make decisions. What’s more, some of the changes that have already been announced are ambiguous and largely declarative in nature. While on the one hand, President Assad’s multi-party decree ends the power monopoly of the ruling Arab Socialist Rebirth Party (BAAS), on the other hand, the 1963 constitutional clause guaranteeing BAAS the right to rule is still in force. About a dozen smaller parties that have always been inextricably allied with BAAS can now function on their own. It’s unclear, however, who will finance them and how, and whether serious political forces, whose supporters keep flooding the streets of major cities to press Mr. Assad to step down, will agree to withdraw into party offices.

Russian analyst Vladimir Akhmedov gives his view:

“This is, of course, a tactical move, an attempt to remove people from the streets and steer the conflict into a political channel. In my opinion, this should have been done three months before. Actually, the aim of the multi-party tactics is to conduct a pre-emptive referendum on the re-election of the head of state in line with the new law on elections. There will be a semblance of party plurality, which would enable Bashar Assad to hold an early presidential election without losing his face. True, Mr. Assad is in a dire situation. The authorities need to do something if they want to rescue themselves and their president.”

Most of the analysts asked by the Voice of Russia to comment on the developments in Syria agree that Bashar Assad’s latest cabinet reshuffle was a cosmetic renovation of the political façade of the Syrian establishment. Opposition demands have actually been ignored. No political dialogue has in fact been launched.

There still is hope that common sense will prevail and that both side will refrain from violence and sort out their arguments at the negotiating table. But time is running out.

August 5th, 2011, 10:20 pm

 

Haytham Khoury said:

The Islamist is by no way the main force in the Syrian opposition or the Syrian streets. It is possible to divide the Syrian opposition into 4 groups. The Muslim Brotherhood, the center right (moderate Islamists and are businessmen), the center left (secular independent) and the extreme left. The Muslim Brotherhood does not constitute more than 10%. The extreme left are old parties that do not have real support among the people. The majority of the Syrian people will go with the center left or the center right.

August 5th, 2011, 10:23 pm

 

beaware said:

Clinton: Syria Death Toll Exceeds 2,000
Friday, 5 August 2011
http://www.turkishweekly.net/news/121005/clinton-syria-death-toll-exceeds-2-000-.html
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Thursday that U.S. officials believe more than 2,000 people have been killed in the Syrian government’s months-long crackdown on dissent. Meeting her Canadian counterpart, Clinton appealed for a “louder, more effective” international response to the violence.

Clinton said the U.N. Security Council’s presidential statement late Wednesday condemning Syrian human rights violations reflects a growing international consensus against the violence, which she said has claimed more than 2,000 lives.

But she said it will take more to stop the killing and that European and Arab countries need to join the United States in imposing tougher sanctions and other penalties against the Damascus government of President Bashar al-Assad.

Clinton met with Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird after the U.S. Treasury Department added another prominent Syrian businessman and Assad associate, Muhammad Hamsho, to its list of Syrians facing a U.S. asset freeze and business blacklist.

Clinton said the United States is committed to doing all it can, including additional sanctions, to curb the abuses. But she said the U.S. effort needs help from countries with broader business dealings with Syria.

“But not just U.S. sanctions because, frankly, we do not have lot of business with Syria,” said Secretary Clinton. “We need to get Europeans and others [involved]. We need to get the Arab states. We need to get a much louder, more effective chorus of voices that are putting pressure on the Assad regime, and we’re working to obtain that.”

Canadian Foreign Minister Baird said the international response on Syria has been hampered by the lack of the kind of mandate in the United Nations that authorized military action against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

“The situation in Syria, the actions of the Assad regime, are obviously abhorrent,” said Baird. “The way they’ve acted in recent weeks, months, even in the last 48 hours in Hama, is absolutely disgraceful. Regrettably, we don’t have the same amount of international support at the U.N. for this. So I think in the absence of that, what we’ve got to continue to do is to work with like-minded allies. There’s no country who can single-handedly tackle this challenge.”

Suggesting that international outrage on Syria is growing, Clinton said the consensus in the U.N. Security Council for the statement approved on Wednesday could not have been achieved just a week ago.

“The step that we did see made last night in the Security Council was the first step in what we hope will be continuing steps to try to unite the world in both rhetorical outrage, but in actions that will send a very clear message to the Assad regime, the insiders there, that there’s a price to pay for this kind of abuse and attacks on their own people,” said Clinton.

Earlier, the State Department dismissed as “empty rhetoric” an announcement by the Syrian leader that he would allow reforms — including letting opposition parties operate for the first time.

It said U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford, who is in Washington this week for his Senate confirmation hearing, will return to his post on Friday, despite Congressional calls that he be withdrawn to protest Syria’s actions.

Friday, 5 August 2011

August 5th, 2011, 10:25 pm

 

Norman said:

The problem in Syria can be solved, I saw one of the opposition on BBC and if he means what he said, he said that the opposition will be happy if the president and the government will do the following,

1) Cancel article 8
2) Multi party system
3) election law
4) Set time table for election for parliament in like 6 months
5) Announce that president Assad will not run in 2014

I personally think that these requests are reasonable and the president, The Baath party and the army will be advised on these reforms as soon as possible to save Syria and her people,

If they do all these and the opposition do not cooperate then they will be on a solid ground to move forward without them,

August 5th, 2011, 10:53 pm

 

jad said:

Dear Abughassan,
“How do you think this crisis will end without a civil war?”
It’s going that way, the superior ‘Caucasian’ godly almighty west with its lovely hypocrisy of the two head policies is back to its colonial roots especially with the self-made financial trouble it’s in and it needs to create some huge international crises to get back on the track of using the sub-human colored bunch suffering as token for its own future survivor.
-In the short term, (this month), I think we will read about few massacres similar to Jisr Ashghour to be committed against the army and probably against some Alawite villages by some armed militias consist of thugs, it will be followed by regime retaliation similar to Hama1982 style massacre, that will be used by the Caucasian west for step 2,
– Western intervention and strikes similar to Iraq war 1 that will lead to a very weak Syrian regime with sanctions that may kill thousands of Syrians and defiantly the collapse of the Syrian regime that again will be followed by step 3,
-A photocopy of Iraq after gulf war 2, a country with civil war in every city, very poor nation and maybe facing another Sykes–Picot agreement that will split Syria into pieces as suggested couple years ago by the Americans where Turkey will get the upper hand ruling over what used to be called Syria, it will become an Afghanistan like piece of land since no oil or anything worth fighting for to keep or help.
Welcome to the future and sorry for this bright picture I’m drawing for you my friend but that is where things are heading at the moment.
Syrians will prove again that they are not worth to form a state, to develop themselves or to do anything but destroy everything they touch, keep in mind that the middle ages came after the collapse of Rome.

August 5th, 2011, 10:56 pm

 

Majed97 said:

Failure of the Syrian government is not and should not be an option, at least not now.

I’m not sure why it is so hard for some people to see how a sudden collapse of the Syrian government is almost certain to ignite a full scale civil war, to be followed by a breakup of the country based on sectarian divide. Evidence of such outcome is all around us, inside and outside Syria. Without a strong central government to preserve the country’s unity, Syria as we know it will be lost forever. A fragmented Syria is nothing short of a failed state to be run by renegades and destined to be carved up by its stronger neighbors; mainly Turkey and Israel. The Assad family is not responsible for Syria’s sectarian and ethnic makeup; so their departure will not heal that ancient rift embedded deep into Syria’s history. Fantasizing about a rosy outcome following a quick toppling of Bashar’s regime is nothing less than an immature romance that will end up with many broken hearts. Be very careful of what you wish for because you just might get it; just ask any Iraqi.

August 5th, 2011, 11:13 pm

 

Abughasan said:

Majed97,
Thank you. That was a very good post,however,what do you think is possible as a way out when the regime has so much blood on its hands and when Bashar,in my opinion,has failed as a leader?

August 5th, 2011, 11:24 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Thanks,majed97. That was a well-written post.
What do you think is possible as a way out when Bashar failed as a leader and the regime has so much blood on its hands?

August 5th, 2011, 11:27 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Jad,I hope you are wrong.
Who was that opposition figure on BBC ?

August 5th, 2011, 11:33 pm

 

velvet said:

Abughassan

I think that once Hama and Deir el Zor are somehow ‘pacified’, these are the scenarios:

1- The army make a coup (maybe all arranged) and depose Bashar al Al Assad into exile or Bashar Al Assad may announce his resignation and self-exile.
The army would then control the country. Then we are in the Egyptian scenario: Elections etc…. It does not mean it will work as we see how difficult it is in Egypt but that will garantee some kind of stability or continuity and prevent extremists groups to take over. Emergeny law and curfew will be imposed.

2- Bashar al Assad may cancel article 8 and announces a presidential election before 2014, maybe in 3-6 months with observers from Turkey, India and South Africa (Brics). That would force the opposition to nominate leaders. Bashar may or may not be a candidate. New faces will emerge, demonstrations may stop.

3- Bashar al Assad does nothing hoping to have the upper hand in a elusive dialog with an unexistent opposition leadership, then the country would falls into a continuous violence, action-retributions until both sides are exhausted and call for external help.

In my view the opposition will not be satisfied without a scapegoat as we have seen in Egypt. They want Bashar Al Assad out, either in exile or on trial, trying to ignore that the army is much more then Bashar himself, the regime they hate. There will be, like in Egypt, a military authoritarian regime that will present itself as a “transition” to an promised democracy.

August 5th, 2011, 11:36 pm

 

jad said:

I hope that too, but this is the only scenario I can think of at the moment.
Which opposition figure you are referring to and what did he say?

August 5th, 2011, 11:46 pm

 

Majed97 said:

I think the current government should work with the oppositions on a timetable to transition Syria into a secular democracy, and set a timetable for free elections. Of course that means the oppositions need to come to the table first.

Removing Bashar through a free election is the best way out of this mess, and most acceptable scenario for his supporters. Like him or not, he does have significant support in the country, and his supporters should not be disenfranchised.

August 5th, 2011, 11:50 pm

 

N.Z. said:

“-In the short term, (this month), I think we will read about few massacres similar to Jisr Ashghour to be committed against the army and probably against some Alawite villages by some armed militias consist of thugs, it will be followed by regime retaliation similar to Hama1982 style massacre, that will be used by the Caucasian west for step 2,”

If this is how someone, somehow, summarizes the situation in Syria and does not see himself as someone prostrating himself to the untouchable, ya haif!

Abughassan’s second question deserves a follow up answer: What do you think is possible as a way out when Bashar failed as a leader and the regime has so much blood on its hands?

What a

August 5th, 2011, 11:51 pm

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Abugassan
What do you mean and define “when Bashar failed as a leader “

August 5th, 2011, 11:52 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Bashar,according to a number of “connected” Syrians may be just the head of the regime but not the ultimate decider,he lacks the charisma and the experience his father had. A friend of his assured me that he did not want to be president,and now even if he wants out,he may not be able to do so. Another friend firmly believes that the regime is willing to sacrify him if needed,he used the outrageous absence of Bashar from the national media as an example after everybody was expecting him to make clear announcement about article 8,his intention not to run again,and the plan for new elections. This is why I believe he is not the key.his departure must be negotiated with the group that appoints him president. I want him out but only as part of a bigger settlement.
The army is the key,not bloggers here,me included,pony tailers or islamists.
Many will ridicule this post,I am used to that by now,but those “informants” may not be entirely wrong..

August 6th, 2011, 12:11 am

 

Abughassan said:

Majedkhaldoun,
Bashar did not handle this crisis well and did not keep his early promises. He is surrounded by hawks and corrupt officials and his political life will be short.
This is not 1982,he may survive this crisis short term but very few want him to stay.
One prominent general expressed his wish that the opposition agrees to sit down with the regime heads,even outside Syria,to draft a plan that stops the bloodshed,avoids future revenge and gives reasonable assurances to the regime heads instead of cornering the regime from all directions and force a civil war. That guy is not powerful enough to make a difference but he is not alone. Dehumanizing your political enemies only serve to ignite more extreme measures from both sides. Those who ordered the incusion in Hama and those who refuse to talk are not doing syria a favor.The voice of reason is quickly being muted by the sound of guns,and the smell of roses is being replaced by the smell of blood.

August 6th, 2011, 12:26 am

 

ss said:

1. I think Assad has the army, the minorities, and part of the conservative at his side. I don’t understand why he should resign if there is no upscale demonstration against him including an uprise all over Damascus and Aleppo. Just because it happened that you don’t like him, that not sufficient reason to step down.

2. The idea of international intervention in Syria is an idea and not reality. There are many players in the region. The international intervention in Libya has been a total failure. HA in Lebanon will attack Israel. Iran will target US bases in Iraq and Afghanistan. Syria is weakened by the internal unrest but the regime may use what it has as a last measure before falling. This is too much a sacrifice that the west can afford now. Moreover another war will really bring the US economy into further depression more than what we already have.

August 6th, 2011, 1:00 am

 

ss said:

3. The west is watching the videos posted here and there. Just look at the video posted in this post where it sows radical islamists, and one of them looks exactly like bin laden, shouting Allah wa Akbar, calling for Jihad. Threatening minorities. Why in the world would anybody want to bring a secular regime down and replace it by radical one?

5. Many videos have emerged as a proof of the criminal acts and radical behavior of the armed thugs and gangs in the streets of Syria. We are seeing people shouting Allah wa Akbar, and hungry for more blood shed. These retarded radical islamist should not determine the future of secular Syria.

6. The united nation and the international community will most likely accuse Assad as a war criminal and bring him to international court……lol….well let them come to Syria and take him out. The same thing happened to Omar Bashir of Sudan and they were not able to drag him to that court. I believe the west is mounting pressure and Assad knows that well.

August 6th, 2011, 1:06 am

 

NK said:

Norman

طلع على لساننا شعر و نحن نعيد نفس الكلام
We’ve been asking for those things for 5 months now, the Assad is not interested in any solution that includes him leaving office. This was made clear by all his speeches and it’s also rejected by all the menhebakites including those on this blog, do you remember how many times someone would say “Assad will leave office eventually” and somebody will insult him for talking non sense and follow with “الى الأبد الى الأبد” Bashar should rule forever! ?

Have you seen the new party law ? after all this fuss about reforms and a new law that will allow to move the country towards democracy, and be an example for other nations, look what we got
http://sns.sy/sns/?path=news/read/38804
and look at the lovely comments of Syrian Electronic Shabeeha

من قبل احمد في 04/08/2011 20:30:48
أبناء الأسد وأحفاد الخالد حافظ الأسد
نحن نريد لهذا البلد الأزدهار و التقدم بقيادة الرئيس بشار الأسد و نحن نفديه بدمائنا وأرواحنا فدى ألأسد
ونرجو من السيد الرئيس بشار الأسد أن يبقى حزب البعث العربي الأشتراكي قائد للدولة و الشعب لأه علمنا معنى القومية العربية
ونرجو بأن لا تقوم أحزاب جديدة مرتبطة بأجندات اجنبية وتكون عميلة للدول الأستعمارية
ونرجو عدم الموافقة على تأسيس أحزاب للذين يسوون أنفسهم معارضة لأنهم أبواق للدول الغربية وشكرا سيدي رئيس الجمهورية الدكتور بشار الأسد لهذه العطاءات للشعب الشريف

Same with the new media law, they are scrapping the National Media Council and putting the media under the minister of information, in other words nothing is being changed and the media will remain a hostage of this regime

http://www.syria-news.com/readnews.php?sy_seq=135834

Of course we all remember the new demonstration law, which should really be named the demonstration-prevention law.

and the new election law which puts elections under the supervision of an judicial committee to be named by the supreme judicial council (headed by non other than Bashar himself), of course judges in Syria and the judicial branch in general are not independent, it’s actually quite powerless and the lowest mukhabarat agent can drag the highest ranking judge, throw him in a cell and throw away the key (prime example Haytham al Maleh), in conclusion this law did not disappoint, it is a joke.

So as you see my dearest Norman, this regime will NEVER reform, it’s as one U.S official said, unwilling and incapable of reform. Don’t get me wrong, is Bashar announces tomorrow he’s willing to do the above I will give him the benefit of the doubt, although I’m sure he never will, you’ll see.

As for you Mr Majed97

“The Assad family is not responsible for Syria’s sectarian and ethnic makeup; so their departure will not heal that ancient rift embedded deep into Syria’s history.”
What ancient deeply embedded rift are you talking about, those who read this statement might think Syrians were knee deep in each others blood before the Baath/Assad took over. There was no sectarian struggle in Syria before the Assads. I like to remind you and those who love to ignore history, Hafez himself attended the Homs military academy in 52 and was a minister from 61-63 before the Baath took power. There are many good books about Syrian history, I suggest you read a couple before you spread such misinformation.

August 6th, 2011, 1:12 am

 

jad said:

Aboughassan, I wished I was wrong, but here you go the first step from the ‘Caucasian’ west as I told you about, we are heading Iraqi road and those wannabe something, Dr. Boring and his traitor friends are getting what they are asking for, destroying Syria:

“أنباء موسكو”: كلينتون للمعارضة السورية “النظام بات ضعيفا”.. وواشنطن تحذر من السفر الى سورية

نقلت وكالة “أنباء موسكو” عن مصادر موثوقة قولها إن هيلاري كلينتون، وزيرة الخارجية الأمريكية اعتبرت خلال اجتماعها بوفد المعارضة السورية في واشنطن يوم 3 أغسطس/آب أن النظام السوري “بات ضعيفا والاحتجاجات تتصاعد كل يوم”.

وبحسب المصادر فأن كلينتون أعربت في الوقت ذاته عن خشية واشنطن من اندلاع حرب أهلية في سورية.

ورأت المصادر أن الوزيرة أوحت بأن أفضل سيناريو لتجنيب البلاد مخاطر الحرب الداخلية أن تقوم المؤسسة العسكرية بالسيطرة على الموقف والامساك بمقاليد الأمور. في الوقت ذاته أبلغت كلينتون المعارضة أن المعطيات المتوافرة لدى الإدارة الأمريكية تشير إلى تماسك المؤسسة العسكرية في سورية، بفضل سيطرة مقربين من عائلة الرئيس السوري بشار الأسد على أبرز المفاصل فيها.

في هذا الاطار لفت المعارضون السوريون إلى “نفوذ قوي لدى روسيا وتركيا في أوساط الجيش” في إشارة إلى أن البلدين، أو أحدهما، يمكن أن يلعب دورا مهما في هذا الاتجاه، وتطرق المجتمعون إلى ضرورة الحصول على موقف روسي “أفضل تجاه الأزمة”.

في غضون ذلك أشارت مصادر “أنباء موسكو” إلى ما وصف بأنه “خطوات قوية” تقوم بها واشنطن بينها السماح للمعارضين السوريين المتواجدين في واشنطن بعقد لقاءات مع كل الوزراء الأجانب الذين يزورون الولايات المتحدة، وأشار المصدر إلى أن أول هؤلاء هو وزير الخارجية الكندي جون بايرد الذي يلتقي اليوم مع المعارضة السورية في واشنطن، ولفت المصدر إلى أن التسهيلات التي منحتها واشنطن للمعارضين السوريين باتت أقرب إلى الإعتراف بوجود مكتب تمثيلي دائم لهم ينشط في العاصمة الأميركية، ولفت إلى أن هذا الوضع شديد الشبه بالوضع الذي كانت تتمتع به المعارضة العراقية في واشنطن في الفترة الأخيرة من حكم الرئيس الراحل صدام حسين.

الخارجية الأمريكية تحث رعاياها على مغادرة سورية

في سياق آخر حثت وزارة الخارجية الامريكية رعاياها مجددا على مغادرة سورية وضرورة تأجيل السفر الى هذا البلد.

وحذرت الخارجية في بيان صدر لها يوم 5 أغسطس/آب انه في ضوء “الغموض والتقلب المستمر يتم حث الرعايا الامريكيين على المغادرة فورا، في الوقت الذي ما زالت فيه وسائل النقل متاحة”. كما نصح البيان الامريكيين بعدم القيام باي تنقلات غير ضرورية داخل سورية.

وكانت واشنطن قد طلبت في اواخر ابريل/نيسان الماضي من افراد عائلات موظفي البعثة الامريكية وموظفين محددين غير ضروريين مغادرة سورية.

August 6th, 2011, 1:15 am

 

Alescander said:

A lot of reasonable thinking tonight, syrians are sick of bloodshed,
Norman I like what you said, but do you really think the opposition would accept ? Every time a demand of the opposition has been satisfied , the opposition redicules it
I understand that opposition wants the dissolution of the security system first, but the negative of that will be a possibility of thugs dominating the streets,
The Syrian army and security forces are the only reason why Syria is not divided, call them criminals , thugs , shabbiha , they will keep us afloat until a democratic system kicks in, then the accountability will make them phase out,
Again I see the items Norman mentioning very reasonable , if done in a stepwise fashion lives will be saved
It is sickening hearing the monotone of just toppling the regime, but what is the plan after ?
None ,
This is just irresponsible
Most of us hate to admit it but the main player here is the تخلف
On both sides
The backwardness ” on the opposition side is their refusal to take measures that can shorten the suffering , the are not agreeing on a leadership
It was said the Shukry al kwatly the first Syrian president told Jamal Abdul Nasser upon reliquinshing his position to the state of union with Egypt :
” I give you a country of two million , one and a half million of them are leaders ” زعماء ”
We have not rid ourselves of backwardness … Government and people alike
And please don’t miss the fact that armed people ( read al akhbar today about arms smuggling from Lebanon ) , fanatics complicate matters

Please put Syria first an let’s move on beyond our egos
In doing so we may create the best country ever…..intact

This may be very late but Mr AB accusing Joshua of ” connections with the regime ” is not fair
I was a neighbor of his in laws in lattakia for 14 years , mr kash’ur and his wife focused on their children’s education , mr kash’ur was humble despite being the head of the navy academy ,
This family is far from being interested in kissing up to the regime
Goooooood night

August 6th, 2011, 2:06 am

 

Dale Andersen said:

LAST FRIDAY’S BEIRUT BOMBING WAS AN ATTEMPTED HIT ON NASRALLAH

Report: A Kuwaiti newspaper says last Friday’s explosion in southern Beirut was an attempt to assassinate Hassan Nasrallah. However, Hezbollah leaders say blast was result of technical problem. The report claimed that Israel had received information that Nasrallah was to meet senior Hezbollah officials in Beirut’s southern suburbs on Friday, among them Samir Kuntar – a Lebanese terrorist freed in a Hezbollah-Israel prisoner swap.The report said that there are no known details testifying that Nasrallah was hurt, but it is known that several Hezbollah members were wounded. It is believed that the blast hurt Mustafa Badr al-Din, the main suspect in the murder of Former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri and one of the successors of Hezbollah’s late military leader Imad Mughniyeh, who was assassinated in 2008. Various rumors were circulated in Lebanon regarding the explosion, and Hezbollah issued an official announcement claiming the blast was a result of a technical problem with a gas tank, and that there were no casualties. However, Hezbollah forces closed off the scene and did not allow Lebanese police or army forces to enter – a move which raised suspicions that the explosion was a more significant event than Hezbollah leaders let on. Meanwhile, the Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Siasa reported on Tuesday that Hezbollah has arrested more than 50 members of the organization on suspicion they were involved in the assassination of Imad Mughniyeh and for backing opposition movements in Iran and Syria. The report quotes foreign diplomats saying that there are feelings of uncertainty (i.e., paranoia??) in Hezbollah since the assassination of Mughniyeh, and in particular due to the recent instability in Syria and Iran…

I think this is Saad Hariri settling a score, yes?

http://drybonesblog.blogspot.com/2006/08/hezbollahs-nasrallah.html

August 6th, 2011, 2:55 am

 

Nour said:

I have a question to participants here. Does anyone know of any Syrian group in Boston? I am planning an event there around the situation in Syria and wanted to see if there is any group that would host it. Thanks.

August 6th, 2011, 2:56 am

 

Rasmus said:

In every single Arab uprising this year observers have again and again argued that the lack of leadership is the big weakness for the opposition. I think this is very questionable.

The one thing we know for sure is that the lack of leadership is an important reason behind the success of the protest movements. It makes them open for any one to join and the regimes doesn’t know how to handle them (the snake doesn’t have a head they can cut off). If someone tried to claim leadership, groups of people might refuse to take part in the uprising and the leadership would be very vulnerable to attacks – verbal and physical – from the regime.

So I believe you are wrong when you write that:

“Once a united leadership emerges in Syria, it will be able to win the confidence of the majority and topple the regime on its own.”

First of all, a united leadership cannot emerge in Syria unless the repression was drastically reduced. At the moment the flat structure of the local committees is the only way they can survive and prevent being infiltrated and arrested. Only in the ‘liberated’ cities would it perhaps be possible to build a hierarchy, but how could such leaders ever claim to represent the whole country?

Secondly, how can it even be possible for any leaders “to win the confidence of the majority”? What could such a leadership possibly base their legitimacy on? Political legitimacy, when it can’t be based on ethnic or religious ties, has to be based on performance. But who in Syria could ever have had the opportunity to prove him or herself to the wider public? In Egypt and Tunisia there still does not seem to be any leadership figure capable of uniting the country, so how could this be possible in Syria?

You seem to base your arguments on the idea that only if the protest movement wins support of the majority will it be able to topple the regime. I don’t think this is the case. Only one in four Egyptians participated in the revolution and many people were not supporting it until Mubarak had left and the state media propaganda ended. Most people will understandably be sceptical towards protest movements and wont dare to join them until they become victorious. In fact you could ask: are revolutions ever accomplished by majorities?

August 6th, 2011, 3:35 am

 

haz said:

Why the concern about leaders? Are you really saying that the problem in Iraq and Lebanon was that they didn’t/don’t have enough leaders? The fewer leaders, and the longer it takes them to emerge, the better, I say.

August 6th, 2011, 3:45 am

 

hsyrian said:

Q: Does anyone know of any Syrian group in Boston ?
A: You should contact the Syrian embassy in your country and submit your project. We may be able to help you.
A: Buy an advertising page in your local newspaper.

Disclaimers

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius — and a lot of courage — to move in the opposite direction.” Einstein

August 6th, 2011, 4:28 am

 

N.Z. said:

Colonial mentality concept essentially refers to the acceptance, by the colonized, of the culture or doctrines of the colonizer as intrinsically more worthy or superior. The colonial mentality seems to be engraved in those so called “supporters” who cannot see beyond Assads’ rule.

“In the short term, (this month), I think we will read about few massacres similar to Jisr Ashghour to be committed against the army and probably against some Alawite villages by some armed militias consist of thugs, it will be followed by regime retaliation similar to Hama1982 style massacre, that will be used by the Caucasian west for step 2,”

It is precisely the mindset in this quoted comment that encourages a civil war consciously or unconsciously. He has the audacity to ignore the 2000+ Syrians dead, and 5000 missing, and the thousands apprehended, tortured and maimed. An unbiased comment, will include all loss of lives. Regardless. Such comments are designed to encompass civil strife.

Then Majed97, said “I’m not sure why it is so hard for some people to see how a sudden collapse of the Syrian government is almost certain to ignite a full scale civil war”

Is what’s happening now not a full scale war with tanks and heavy artillery by this despicable regime on its people?

If this regime was truly concerned about the state of its people, it will have acted completely differently. The opposition is not to be blamed. It was clear from the beginning that the regime was acting foolishly, they dig their graves solely. Their demise is a matter of time. We are at a stage were the protesters together with the opposition will not give up.

As such, wisdom dictates that we support the eternal, namely, the Syrians.

August 6th, 2011, 4:36 am

 

N.Z. said:

Such comments are designed to encompass a civil strife.

August 6th, 2011, 4:39 am

 

hsyrian said:

False Claims from typical Muslim Brothers:

“There was no sectarian struggle in Syria before the Assads. I like to remind you and those who love to ignore history, Hafez himself attended the Homs military academy in 52 and was a minister from 61-63 before the Baath took power.”

Claims from ????

“Many Jews fled from Syria to Palestine during the anti-Jewish riots of 1947”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Jews

Disclaimers
When two propaganda collide , the truth is not the result.

August 6th, 2011, 4:40 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ revlon
i’ve been going to various mosques, like the hassan mosque. right after there was a demonstration there in abu remaneh, i visited that mosque. it was completely surrounded by thugs standing in 4s and 3s.
il try my luck with another mosque today. the thing is, im pretty sure alot of people praying want to demonstrate but the site of the shabeeha discourages them.
the shamsiye mosque is about a 5 minute walk from the presidential residence in malki.
@ at all
yesterday sana broadcast an sms ,informing us that they were going to display their latest “proof”
, the mutilation of a corpse in Deir il Zor. it is gruesome, its is followed by chants declaring the people of deir il zor are slaughterers.
im just wondering, is the regime getting so desperate that it needs to advertise it’s latest “scoop”???

August 6th, 2011, 5:17 am

 

hsyrian said:

Two opposing “opposition” claims

” he [ President ] may survive this crisis short term but very few want him to stay.”

“One of the opposition said that the opposition will be happy if the President Assad will announce that he will not run in 2014”

My question:

Why forbid an alleged “unpopular” candidate to run in a democratic free election ?

Disclaimer

“Two intelligent fools [Muslim Brothers] in the opposition can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius — and a lot of courage — from any government to move in the opposite direction.” Syrian version adapted from Einstein .

August 6th, 2011, 5:17 am

 

hsyrian said:

About peaceful protests

The US concept of free speech does not allow a group of people to assemble on any public space [ on federal properties , it is completely forbidden ] and to block the streets without a proper permit has been issued by the local authorities.

Usually the local authority will require a liability insurance before a permit or permission will be granted for a protest or demonstration

Disclaimers
I challenge any Syrian opposition supporter in the US to go in front of the White House and shouts for hours ” We want to execute the US President ”
or to shout in an airplane ” I like to trigger a bomb ” even if he is seated next to Marylin Monroe.

August 6th, 2011, 6:00 am

 

Mr.president said:

AbuGassan,
I do not see any immediate solution to the current conditions in Syria. I suspect that we are moving into a low level civil war that is similar to Iraq”s civil war. The Islamists did not win the civil war in Iraq even when Iraq did not even have an army. So why should one expect them to win it in Syria? The Turks were able to manage a civil war with the local kurds..Unless an outside power invests in removing the current Syrian government I suspect that you and I will be talking about the same thing next Ramadan. However, the current Syrian government has too many cards when it comes to the international theatre. I guess that was why Erdogan, the PM of Turkey, pulled back big time.

August 6th, 2011, 6:09 am

 

AB said:

43. hsyrian, you are missing the point. If an American is against the president or any other politician, they can exercise their right to vote in the ballot box.

Syrian citizens are not afforded that right thanks to the Assad’s. The only way they can get their point across is by demonstrating against the regime even if that action endangers their lives.

August 6th, 2011, 6:19 am

 

darryl said:

12. Dale Andersen

You probably may know of one Murphys laws which says:
“Friends come and go but enemies accumulate!”

August 6th, 2011, 6:25 am

 

Aboud said:

HSyrian is suddenly enamored with the American system, which for months the Baathists on this forum kept telling us was a fake democracy.

If the American president had ordered half the number of killings as junior has, there wouldn’t be any need for people to go into the streets to call for his death. He would have been impeached and jailed.

The American constitution guarantees the right to bear arms, and for the populace to form lawful militias to protect themselves against an oppressive state. Butå I guess that’s one part of the American system that HSyrian won’t be telling us about.

In the west, there is due process of law through which people can have their grievances addressed. It isn’t perfect, but it’s a hell of alot more preferable to the Baathist system where everything ends up in Makhlouf’s pockets.

August 6th, 2011, 7:04 am

 

Aboud said:

Well said AB. When people are denied due process and a legal framework through which to have their grievances addressed, they will take up what ever other means are available to get their rights. Syrians are dying and risking life and limb for rights that other people can obtain through elections or referendums.

August 6th, 2011, 7:59 am

 

Majed97 said:

Denying the existence of sectarian and ethnic division in Syria prior to the Assad family rule is like denying the existence of the sun on a cloudy day. The reason for the apparent lack of sectarian struggle in Syria before the French, Baath and Assads is because the Ottoman had complete control over the minorities and kept boxed in their little corners, mostly in the mountains. And you can thank the French for setting up a system/process that allows Hafez and other Alawis to join the military academy. If the Islamists had any say in it, they will never allow them to leave their homes, let along hold positions of power. Little knowledge is a dangerous thing…

August 6th, 2011, 8:45 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Mr. President #44 said:
“I guess that was why Erdogan, the PM of Turkey, pulled back big time. ”
Mr. Erdogan is busy with the military shuffle,for him Turkey has priority, once this is done and completed, he will issue statement about Syria. Further his foreign minister has just condemned syrian goverment action, and confiscated weapons sent from Iran to Syria.

August 6th, 2011, 8:53 am

 

hsyrian said:

About US Presidents and impeachment

I must remind that :
Some US presidents has sent troops in Vietnam :
The war exacted a huge human cost in terms of fatalities :
Vietnamese soldiers and civilians killed vary from less than one million[29] to more than three million.
Some 200,000–300,000 Cambodians,
20,000–200,000 Laotians,
and
58,220 U.S. service members .

None of these president could have been impeached because they acted as a result of the Case–Church Amendment passed by the U.S. Congress.

Disclaimers:
A President becomes illegitimate after ???? fatalities.

August 6th, 2011, 9:04 am

 

Tara said:

Can the Syrian Alawis agree among each other whether they were particularly persecuted in Syria or not in the past and give us their final answer/perception. I vividly remember Habib’ post where he said they weren’t. He sounded very knowledgeable. Who should we believe?

August 6th, 2011, 9:09 am

 

Norman said:

NK,

don’t you think that the opposition deserve some blame for not talking to government when it asked for a dialogue to set up these laws, when they did not come fearing each other, the government had to move alone, and like in Iraq, when the Sunni boycotted the political system that was set up by the Americans and the election, they found themselves disfranchised with no power, and they moved after AL Qaeda lost and the Shia fought back and went on the attack, they became the friends of the American as they felt safer with them there,
The opposition should come to the table and plan the future of Syria where everybody can be all what he wants to be with equal opportunities ,

About the reason why president Assad did not move faster, It is very clear that the president is not the dictator that many thinks , he is the face of the powerful Baath party and there are many hawks in the Baath party that feel the the Baath party is secular and anybody can join the Baath party so it is more representative of the whole Syrian people than any party and fighting corruption in the party and redistribution of wealth that they failed to do would be enough to correct Syria and save the people,

About the chance of a civil war in Syria,

As long as the government and the army is willing to fight to protect the Syrians from each other and secure the peace and their safety , The Syrians will not arm themselves and fight each other but if the army fails in his mission then will see (( The Christian to Beirut and the Alawat to the Taboot))

It is sad but i have relatives in Homs who just preparing for this possibility.

August 6th, 2011, 9:28 am

 

Haytham Khoury said:

Dear Dr. Landis:
You pointed out to an interesting dilemma. Should the US accelerate the demise of the regime or should the US wait till the Syrian opposition mature and select a viable leadership. It is true that we hope to find an opposition that can fill up the vacuum when the regime falls; however, the the more this unrest lingers, the more armed groups we will see on the streets. That will make the potential transition lawless with security in streets hard to control. Further, from my experience with the opposition outside the country, I have found that the opposition immature, lacks the organized mind and the sense of responsibility. For this reason, it is a real dilemma. Personally, I will continue working to bring the opposition together. This is my dream. Indeed, “I have a dream”

August 6th, 2011, 9:39 am

 

Observer said:

I do not believe that the US can exert significantly more pressure on Syria. Even with the cooperation and coordination with the EU it will not be possible to have such pressure as to destroy the regime. We are in a multiple polar world. The regime still benefits from regional passive support and from active Iranian support.

The people will topple the regime and the wall of fear has been broken. The courage of the Syrian people who continue to protest despite the repression in Hama and Homs and Idlib and Deir and Damascus and elsewhere is awe inspiring. The brutality of the regime is proof of desperation. I am stunned at the extent and size of the protests yesterday despite the huge security presence. This is real courage for you.

The regime is cornered psychologically and the major motivating factor in its response is now pure fear. I do not sense that there is any short term or long term strategy. It is beset by fear for they are seeing all around them the demise of dictators.

Cracks within the regime are appearing and there are defections with significant objections to the role that the brother is playing.

The break in the silence of the regional players indicates that the supporters of the status quo ( with reforms within the regime ) such as Turkey or UAE are having second thoughts about the regime’s response, its survival, and its ability to stabilize the situation. The inability of the regime to completely destroy dissent in the week before and after the start of Ramadan is giving all of those regional players pause.

One measure of the desperation of the regime is the persistent refrain of the presence of armed gangs and on this forum the persistence of the supporters in labeling others and pigeon hole them into categories of dissent such as MB and the like. It really is weird to read and listen to such comments as if the regime and its supporters live in a parallel world. Whether it is on TV or here or elsewhere it portends to one world view as if they do not want to believe their eyes and do not want to see that the regime is the source of instability corruption nepotism sectarianism graft brutality destroyer of men and earth and beasts alike.

As for the opposition not having a leadership I think that this is only a result of the repression of the regime. They have exiled active opposition members and killed others and imprisoned others and there are millions of Syrians with self imposed exile simply because life in Syria has become unbearable to them and opportunities are the exclusive domain of a few.

One final thought: it is clear that Junior has only a very thin veneer of modernity, his image with his first lady as modern secular forward looking and of this world turned out to be nothing more than a veneer; a mirage. He reverted to his father’s ilk very quickly. As a matter of fact proof of his treachery lies in the fact that for the last 10 years he did not exclude the very brutal brother that he has from position of leadership in the security state. He remains an ignorant brutal dictator. If at least he were smart or eloquent; one could stomach his nonsense for more than 30 seconds.

August 6th, 2011, 9:42 am

 

Haytham Khoury said:

I wrote on a day a blog with the title “The Illusion of Dialogue”:

The dialogue that took place on July 10 &11, 2011 between representatives of the Syrian government, independent personalities, “visitors from abroad” and some members the opposition will lead to nothing. This is simply because the opposition figures who participated in this dialogue (and of course the other participants, too) have not understood the demands of the Syrian people. The Syrians have taken the decision to close a page in their history and open a new one. The Syrian people correctly have understood that “No one puts a piece of new cloth on an old garment.” It seems that these opposition figures have not felt well the pulse of the Syrian street. In other words, these figures have no sense of reality. With these words, I am not trying to judge them personally or judge the manner in which they make their decisions in general, but it is an opinion on certain decisions and particular political choices.

In fact, this lack of sense of reality is not unusual and is not particular for a small group of people, but it is indeed the fundamental challenge for all humanity. For that history is full of sad stories and disappointing events. This is why Edward Gibbon wrote: “History is indeed little more than the register of the crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind “. However, I am confident that the Syrian people will prove that the sentence of Edward Gibbon mentioned-above is not relevant to its revolution. In addition, I hope that the rest of the opposition will continue to work to unite in one front to bring the regime down without being affected by this dialogue, because dialogue is just “much ado about nothing.”
http://haytham-khoury2.blogspot.com/2011/07/illusion-of-dialogue.html

August 6th, 2011, 9:51 am

 

mjabali said:

المعارضة السورية متشرذمة ولايمكنها البقاء هكذا اذا ارادت ان تفرض التغيير في سوريا.

المعارضة الموجودة في الخارج ضعيفة إجمالاً، والوحيدون ذوو التأثير هم الاخونجية والباقي امثال عبد الرزاق عيد وكومباني لااهمية لهم علي ارض الواقع. إنهم ظاهرة صوتية لاأكثر ولاأقل.
معارضو الانترنت إجمالاً ظاهرة صوتية لأن معظمهم موتورن غير عقلانيون عاطفيون لايرون بعيداً يصرخون ويشتمون ويخونون ويهددون من دون تفكير.

مشكلة المعارضة الكبرى هي فراغها من الاقليات وحتى الان لم تعمل المعارضة على تطمين الاقليات ابداً. على العكس من هذا، يقوم البعض بالتحريض الطائفي علناً مما يخلق حالة متوترة مخيفة يستغلها الكثير من الاطراف المتنازعة.

المعارضة الداخلية نوعان: المتظاهرون وهم لاتأثير عليهم من قبل اي احد سوى من بعض المشايخ . يوجد مسلحين بين هؤلاء ولكنهم يجابهون بقوة من قبل القوات الموالية للأسد. يقتل العديد من هؤلاء ويقتلو العديد من الامن والجيش كمارأينا. بالطبع اذا لم يتم فرض النظام سيستمر مسلسل القتل من الجانبين مؤديا بالطبع الى الحرب الاهلية من دون شك.

المعارضة الداخلية السلمية امثال كيلو وكومباني فهؤلاء مع ضعفهم فإنهم يتقدمون ببطء شديد ولاسند لهم حقيقي حتى الان لأنهم ليس عندهم احزاب.

الحل الوحيد للمعارضة هو تشكيل الاحزاب فوراً ومن دون تلكأ وتعتعة .

إذا لم تتشكل الاحزاب وبسرعة فالمصائب اتية.

August 6th, 2011, 10:02 am

 

Mango said:

Mr. Landis:
imagine that an exchange of roles between the forces working to control security in the cities to be replaced by forces of United States of America!!! what do you think?

August 6th, 2011, 10:02 am

 

Observer said:

I do not think the US and/or the EU can topple the regime. We live in a multiple polarity world. The geography does not allow for an armed quarantine of Syria. The people of Syria will topple the regime. The leaderless opposition is great, for it is a genuine popular democratic movement and it will mature over time with learning on the go and hardships driving tactics and strategy. If only free expression and open forums were allowed by this stupid clique we would have a real debate about Syria.

The courage of the people is awe inspiring.
I am stunned at the extent and size of the protests yesterday despite the huge security presence. This is real courage for you.

The regime has no strategy. It is now beset by fear; fear of the demise of the regime and is acting like a cornered animal. Lashing out. The regime and its supporters here and elsewhere is quite amazing to observe as if they live in a parallel world where they are the target of armed gangs and hateful people that they pigeonhole into categories of MB and this and that. The slogan Bashar wa bas is also telling of a lack of any alternative world view to that of the adulation of the man. They cannot and do not want to believe their eyes that the regime is responsible for the instability brutality graft corruption nepotism sectarianism and is the destroyer of man beast and earth alike and is the source of the exile and death of hundreds of thousands of Syrians.

Regional passive support is showing signs of second thoughts. Those that are supportive of change within the regime without toppling it are speaking out slowly and timidly but they are looking at the situation and seeing a weakened regime, a lashing out regime, and they are hedging their bets as we have seen with Turkey and the Emirates and Kuwait. The inability of the regime to quell the dissent before and after the start of Ramadan is giving them pause. The fact that demonstrations have continued despite the huge brutal machine unleashed is absolutely stunning to me. It must have shown others that there is no turning back. Yet the only vision that the regime and its supporters have for Syria is that of 3.14.2011 when all was hunky dory for the eternal leader and his family.

As for junior, his thin veneer with his modern first lady has melted away. His image of a modern secular reforming man of this world and a player with other world leaders is nothing more than a mirage. He is of the same ilk as his father, brutal dictatorial; if only he has the intelligence of the father and his political acumen . If only he had any intelligence or eloquence one could at least tolerate listening to his garbage for more than 30 seconds.

August 6th, 2011, 10:03 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Tara @60 –

Even if the ‘Alawis were repressed in times gone by, the present generation of Syrian Sunnis should not bear responsibility for that, an act for the most part perpetrated by the reactionary and feudal Ottoman authorities. Its like punishing 18-yr old South African Whites for apartheid.

August 6th, 2011, 10:07 am

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

Hsyrian is annoying.
.

August 6th, 2011, 10:07 am

 

Ss said:

1. I think Assad has the army, the minorities, and part of the conservative at his side. I dont understand why he should resign if there is no upscale demonstration against him including an uprise all over Damascus and Aleppo. Just because it happend that you dont like him, thats not sufficient reason to step down.

2. The idea of international intervention in Syria is an idea and not reality. There are many players in the region. The international intervention in Lybia has been a total failure. HA in lebanon will attack Israel. iran will target US bases in Iraq and Afghanestan. Syria is weakened by the internal unrest but the regime may use what it has as a last measure befoe falling. This is too much a sacrifice that the west can afford now. Moreover another war will really bring the US economy into further depression more than what we already have.

3. The west is watching the videos posted here and there. Just look at the video posted in this post where it sows radical islamists, and one of them looks exactly like bin laden, shouting alah wa akbar, calling for Jihad. Threatening minorities. Why in the world would anybody want to bring a secular regime down and replace it by radical one.

5. Many videos has emerged as a proof of the criminal acts and radical behavior of the armed thugs and gangs in the streets of Syria. We are seeing people shouting alah wa akbar, and hungry for more blood shed. These retarded radical islamist shoul not determine the future of secular syria.

6. The united nation and the international community will most likely accuse Assad as a war criminal and bring him to international court……lol….well let them come to Syria and take him out. The same thing happened to Omar Bashir of Sudan and they were not able to drag him to that court. I believe the west is mounting pressure and Assad knows that well.

August 6th, 2011, 10:08 am

 

Sheila said:

To #50. Majed97,
“Little knowledge is a dangerous thing…” and I am sorry to say that this is exactly what you are displaying. Ethnic strife in Syria was created by the Ottomans and the French and not subdued by them. The Ottomans did not “box” the monorities in “their little corners” as you claim, on the contrary, they discriminated against them horribly. The Christians in particular were targeted. The dicrimination and the targeted groups changed with the change of the Sultans in Istanbul.
The French did the same. Under divide and conquer, they made sure the Syrian society was divided along ethnic and religious lines to create allies for themselves. During the French mandate almost all government officials had to be christian. And the system that you are thanking the French for creating was another dicriminatory one, Of course unless you were directly benefiting from it.
Yes, we do have episodes in our history that are shameful. But, who doesn’t??? Overall Syria does not have deep ethnic and religious strife. There are many cross-ethnic and cross-religious marriages. As we can recount the bad history, we can also recount the wonderful stories of unity. It seems that we always concentrate on the bad and forget the good.
And finally, how do you know what the Islamists might do? And why are we lumping all the Islamist in one group?. I would like to point at the great things that Erdogan was able to accomplish in Turkey. He is an Islamist, right?
Believe me Majed, most of us are against an Islamist regime at all and in particular one that looks like Saudi Arabia or Iran.

August 6th, 2011, 10:10 am

 

hsyrian said:


The American constitution guarantees the right to bear arms, and for the populace to form lawful militias to protect themselves against an oppressive state

The text of the US constitution is :

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

In 2008 and 2010, the Supreme Court issued two Second Amendment decisions. In District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), the Court ruled that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm, unconnected to service in a militia and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.
Additionally, the Court enumerated several longstanding prohibitions and restrictions on firearms possession that it found were consistent with the Second Amendment

No other country with a modern constitution has included the US concept of right to bear arms .

In Syria , intelligent people would never equate the Muslim Brothers to a well regulated militia.

Disclaimers

“A intelligent fool [Muslim Brothers] in the opposition can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius — and a lot of courage — from a government to move in the opposite direction.” Syrian version adapted from Einstein .

August 6th, 2011, 10:19 am

 

jad said:

خبراء في الاتحاد الأوروبي اتفقوا على توسيع العقوبات ضد سورية ليشمل قطاعات النفط والغاز والقطاع المصرفي

الخارجية الاميركية توسع تحذيرها من السفر لسورية ..

بروكسل – واشنطن ..
نقلت صحيفة “الحياة” اللندنية عن مصادر مطلعة، قولها إن “خبراء من أعضاء اللجنة السياسية والأمنية في الاتحاد الأوروبي اتفقوا على توسيع قوائم العقوبات ضد سوريا، واستهداف المزيد من المسؤولين السوريين في غضون الأسابيع القليلة”، لافتةً الى أنه “هذا الإجراء لا يقتضي موافقة سياسية، ويتوقع أن يتم توسيع القوائم في غضون شهر آب الجاري”.
وأوضحت المصادر، أن “بعض الأطراف الأوروبية اقترحت توسيع العقوبات كي تشمل قطاعات النفط والغاز والقطاع المصرفي”، معتبرةً أن “مثل هذا الاقتراح يقتضي موافقة سياسية لن تتوافر قبل نهاية العطلة الصيفية لمؤسسات الاتحاد الأوروبي.
وفي هذا السياق، كشف مصدر مطلع، للصحيفة عينها، أن “غالبية الدول الأوروبية تريد الحفاظ على سفاراتها في سوريا من أجل متابعة الوضع عن كثب”.
الى ذلك وفي سياق تكثيف الضغوط على سورية , اعلنت وزارة الخارجية الاميركية انه “يتم تشجيع الاميركيين الموجودين في سوريا على المغادرة وضرورة تأجيل السفر الى هذا البلد في اعقاب اعمال العنف التي شهدتها بعض المدن السورية “.
وحذرت وزارة الخارجية انه في ضوء “الغموض والتقلب المستمر” يتم “حث الرعايا الاميركيين على المغادرة فورا في الوقت الذي ما زالت فيه وسائل النقل متاحة”. وشجعت النصيحة ايضا الاميركيين على “الاستمرار في الحد من اي عمليات تنقل غير ضرورية داخل هذا البلد”.

شام برس
————

التلفزيون الإيراني ::
تعلـــن الجمهورية الإسلامية الإيرانية عن تفعيل إتفاقية الدفاع المشترك للمرة الثالثة: و أن اي هجوم على سورية هو هجوم على طهران وسنرد مع سورية على اي ضربة عسكرية تستهدف سيادة أراضيها و مرمى نيراننا سيطال الخيلج حتى تل أبيب.
La télévision officile iranienne annonce ce soir que n’importe qu’elle attaque de l’otan contre la syrie sera considéré comme une attaque contre l’iran et le réponse sera UN BOMBARDEMAN DE TOUT LE GOLF JUSQU A TEL AVIV !!!
———-

امريكا تطلب من رعاياها مغادرة سورية بالسرعة القصوى قبل انقطاع خطوط السفر …. الناتو يباشر بوضع خطة لضرب مواقع سورية استراتيجية
———————————————–

وذكرت وكالة (سانا) للأنباء أن “المعلم أكد المعلم إصرار القيادة السورية على السير في طريق الإصلاح وإنجاز الخطوات التي سبق أن أعلن عنها الرئيس الأسد، ذاكرا أن الانتخابات العامة سوف تجري قبل نهاية هذا العام وسوف يكون صندوق الانتخاب هو الفيصل ويترك لمجلس الشعب الذي سيتم انتخابه أن يراجع القوانين التي اعتمدت ليقرر ما يراه بشأنها”.
http://syria-news.com/readnews.php?sy_seq=135882
————-

أجرى الأمين العام للأمم المتحدة بان كي مون اتصالات بمسؤولين سوريين على أكثر من مستوى وفق ما أوردت صحيفة الحياة، لافتةً إلى أن الأمين العام لم يتلق رداً من أي منهم حتى مساء أمس الجمعة.
ولفتت الصحيفة إلى أن محاولة إجراء اتصالات بمسؤولين سوريين تأتي بعد تبني مجلس الأمن بياناً دعا فيه الأمين العام للأمم المتحدة الى إطلاع مجلس الأمن على المستجدات عن الوضع في سوريا خلال سبعة أيام أي الأربعاء المقبل.
—————————————————

قامت عناصر من التنظيمات الإرهابية المسلحة بهجوم مسلح على مطار ناحية “تفتناز” العسكري التابع لمحافظة إدلب والذي يبعد عنها حوالي 15 كلم، في محاولة منهم لاقتحامه، ما استوجب التصدي لهذا الاعتداء من قبل العناصر الأمنية التي كانت متواجدة حيث سمع دوي إطلاق الرصاص بين الجانبين.
يذكر أن محافظة إدلب باتت مرتعاً لعناصر التنظيمات الإرهابية المسلحة التي تمارس عمليات السطو والنهب والقتل والتي كثرت مؤخراً خاصة في مناطق (خان شيخون – سنجار – معرة النعمان – تفتناز).
————————————————-

أدونيس: أنا عمري ما قلت “أدباً” على الرئيس أن يستقيل
جهينة نيوز- خاص:

نفى الشاعر العربي السوري أدونيس ما تناقلته بعض وكالات الأنباء والقنوات الفضائية أمس عن مطالبته الرئيس بشار الأسد بالاستقالة.

ففي اتصال هاتفي خاص أجري معه مساء الجمعة 5-8-2011 في مقر إقامته في بيروت قال أدونيس موضحاً: أنا تحدثت مع جريدة الرأي الكويتية عن الوضع في سورية، ولكن لم أقل على الرئيس الأسد أن يستقيل.. مستحيل أن أقول ذلك بهذه اللهجة، ومن هنا يجب قراءة التصريح في سياق الحديث، لأن انتزاعه من سياقه يعطيه معنى آخر، وتحريف الكلمة وأخذها من سياقها يغيّر معناها.

وأضاف أدونيس: بجميع الأحوال أنا عمري ما قلت “أدباً” على الرئيس أن يستقيل.. أنا لا أقول ذلك ولا يمكن “من باب التأدب” أن أقول ذلك، أنا قلت: في سياق الوضع المتأزم لو كنت مكان الرئيس لكنت استقلت من باب إذا لم أحل المشكلة أو ليس بمقدوري أن أحل المشكلة.

وقال أدونيس حول كون الخبر نشرته قناة الجزيرة المغرضة: أنا شخصياً لم أتكلم مع قناة الجزيرة ولا أتكلم إطلاقاً وبحياتي ما حكيت معاها!!!.
http://www.jpnews-sy.com/ar/news.php?id=29456

August 6th, 2011, 10:23 am

 

Tara said:

Jad

Kindly provide source of Nato “alleged” plan against Syria. Some Russian news agency “connected” to the Nato? How exactly ” close” is this connection?

August 6th, 2011, 10:40 am

 

jad said:

Leader! no worries, the Syrians are happy to have a Turkish leader for their cause:

إدلب – معرة النعمان||صحفي تركي في مظاهرات معرة النعمان5-8
http://youtu.be/zcjDgQTkUv8

Tara,
here you go:

الناتو يعكف على اعداد خطة عملية عسكرية في سورية

اعرب دميتري روغوزين، مندوب روسيا الدائم لدى حلف شمال الاطلسي، عن اعتقاده بان الحلف يعكف على اعداد خطة للقيام بعملية عسكرية ضد سورية. جاء ذلك في مقابلة اجرتها معه صحيفة “ايزفيستيا” عشية اصدار مجلس الامن الدولي بيانه الرئاسي بصدد سورية في 3 اغسطس/آب، ونشرت الصحيفة تفاصيلها اليوم 5 اغسطس.

س: اعلن اندريس فوغ راسموسين، سكرتير عام الناتو، انه “لم تنشأ في سورية بعد الظروف ليبدأ الناتو عملية عسكرية”، فما معنى هذا؟
يعني انه يجري التخطيط للعملية. ومن شأن هذه العملية أن تكون نهاية منطقية للعمليات العسكرية والاعلامية، التى قامت بها بعض الدول الغربية في شمال افريقيا. وخاصة هناك، حيث تمسك القيادة نخبة لا تتطابق وجهات نظرها مع تصورات الغرب. ففي قطر، حيث توجد قواعد امريكية، على سبيل المثال، لن تحدث مثل هذه التطورات.
ولم يستبعد ابدا التدخل العسكري الانكلوسكسوني في سورية. ولكن روسيا بتوقعها ان التطورات اللاحقة هناك ستشهد قراءة خاطئة لقرار مجلس الامن الدولي (المتشدد في حالة تبنيه) كما في حالة ليبيا، ستعيق تطور الاحداث باستخدام القوة.

س: يرى الخبراء ان سورية ومن ثم اليمن تشكلان المرحلة الاخيرة قبل ايران. فما مدى صحة هذا؟
اخذ الطوق حول ايران يضيق. ويجري التخطيط لعملية عسكرية ضد طهران. وشن حرب واسعة الابعاد في هذه المنطقة الكبيرة لا يروق لنا ابدا. وستكون العواقب بالنسبة لاوروبا وخيمة، وهناك الكثيرون يستوعبون هذا.

س: لأي عدد من الجبهات تكفي قوى الناتو؟ فهو يشارك في عدة نزاعات.
تفترض استراتيجية الناتو امكانية شن حربين كبيرتين ضد دول من المستوى العالي والمتوسط. ويجري وقف الحرب في افغانستان بهدوء دون اي نتائج ملموسة. والاروبيون يفرون من هناك. كما عرضت العملية في ليبيا ان عددا من حلفاء الولايات المتحدة الهامين، مثل النرويج وايطاليا، يعتزمون انهاء مشاركتهم.
ولا يمكن القول انه تتوفر لدى اوروبا موارد اضافية معينة ( سياسية وعسكرية ومادية وبشرية) لشن الحروب. ولا تود اوروبا شن حروب. باستثناء بعض البلدان مثل فرنسا، التي تحاول قيادتها حل مهمات اخرى ـ السياسية الداخلية او الحملة الانتخابية، من خلال المشاركة في الحروب.

وامريكا التي تسدد 75 % من ميزانية الحلف، من المستبعد ان تتحمل المشاركة في حل كافة نزاعات الشرق الاوسط وشمال افريقيا. وكيف سيبدو هذا اذا علمنا ان رئيس البيت الابيض الحالي حائز جائزة نوبل للسلام؟

س: لماذا يسارع الاتحاد الاوروبي في السير في مقدمة الركب في قضية فرض عقوبات ضد سورية، ويبدي نشاطا ملموسا في مجلس الامن؟
ماذا نقصد بالركب؟ اذا كنا نقصد الامم المتحدة، فانها المنظمة الوحيدة التي من حقها البت في قضايا الحرب والسلام. وفيما يتعلق بالاتحاد الاوروبي، فانه يحاول في كل مرة، اثبات انه ليس ضعيفا، ولديه قدراته الحربية. وهذا ليس صحيحا على الاطلاق. فحلف شمال الاطلسي اثبت حاليا، انه اداة الغرب الحربية دون بديل. ولكن المفوضية الاوروبية لا تتفق مع هذا كما يبدو.

http://arabic.rt.com/news_all_news/analytics/68467

August 6th, 2011, 10:40 am

 

Aboud said:

“In 2008 and 2010, the Supreme Court issued two Second Amendment decisions. In District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), the Court ruled that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm, unconnected to service in a militia and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.”

Dude, do you even read what you post? You just weakened your own argument. What that piece says is that a person can own firearms, even if the purpose of owning such firearms isn’t something as noble as protecting the republic from the King of England. Defending one’s family from shabiha scum definitely falls under the definition of self defense.

“Additionally, the Court enumerated several longstanding prohibitions and restrictions on firearms possession that it found were consistent with the Second Amendment”

Kindly enumerate those restrictions for us, instead of just thoughtlessly cutting and pasting the first thing you come across.

“No other country with a modern constitution has included the US concept of right to bear arms .”

What did I say about these Baathists? They cherry pick and choose the parts of Western democracy that they like, and ignore the rest. Of course, they will be the first to tell you what the punishment is for threatening the life of the president, but ignore the fact that people don’t have to resort to such methods when there is an abundance of measures available to limit a bad president’s powers, and remove him when the occasion calls for it.

What other country except Syria has to put up with someone like junior, a little boy playing at president. Husni Mubarak stepped down and saved his country alot of grief and lost lives. Junior is so inept, he makes Husni Mubarak look like a statesman.

“In Syria , intelligent people would never equate the Muslim Brothers to a well regulated militia.”

In Syria, intelligent people know it’s called the Muslim Brotherhood. Intelligent people know that the MB have not had any significant role in this revolution. Intelligent people know that the regime is desperate to blame everything and anything under the sun for its problems. And intelligent people know that no group is as irresponsible with firearms as the shabiha scum. Just ask the Alawi traders whose stores were trashed in Al-Hadara by the shabiha scum, angry over the killing of three other shabiha scum shits, may they roast in hell.

August 6th, 2011, 10:45 am

 

hsyrian said:

Claim typical from Muslim Brothers

“””
I would like to point at the great things that Erdogan was able to accomplish in Turkey. He is an Islamist, right?
“””

Reality

Erdogan is an Islamist and he has done nothing great
but he is trying very hard to change the Turkish secular constitution for an Islamist one.

He is sending his “veiled ” daughter to a foreign school instead of a secular Turkish school.
He is “dismissing” officers in the Turkish Army , the last secular state organization.
….

Disclaimers

Lie travels at the speed of light until it hits the mirror of truth.

August 6th, 2011, 10:46 am

 

Aboud said:

Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/bashar-al-assad-must-step-down/2011/08/05/gIQAS5oFxI_story.html

Bashar al-Assad must step down

Scores have been killed in Hama, Syria, in recent days. Despite a sustained assault by government forces, Syrians continue to demonstrate in the thousands a testament to their courage, their cause, and their desire for the most basic elements of human rights and human dignity. The horror taking place in Syria has led me and others in the Senate to conclude that this regime is not capable of real reform. It has lost all legitimacy. We must be direct and unequivocal in our message to the dictator of Damascus: Bashar al-Assad must step down. The Syrian people should not have to bear the brutality of this regime any longer.

Nor should Syrians outside that country suffer from the terrible reach of this regime. Sakher Hallak visited the United States in May to attend a medical conference. Sakher, the brother of a naturalized American citizen from Syria who is a respected oncology researcher, disappeared upon his return. His wife contacted authorities, who confirmed that he was in their custody and said that he would be released shortly. The next day, Sakher’s wife and daughter were interviewed by authorities, who again said that he would be released.

Two days later, Sakher’s mutilated body was discovered in a village about 12 miles south of Aleppo, the city in northern Syria where he was from. Several bones were broken. Syrian authorities have denied Sakher was ever in their custody and said they found his body in a ditch by the side of a road.

Sakher was not a political activist. He was not involved in the demonstrations. His sole “offense” appears to be that he attended a conference and visited his brother in the United States.

Assad has ruled Syria by force and repression since 2000, following the precedent set by his father. Syrians have been protesting the regime since March, when government authorities arrested 15 schoolchildren in the city of Daraa for spray painting anti-government slogans. These children were reportedly tortured while in custody, and authorities resorted to force when their parents and others in their community called for their release. Within a week, police had killed 55 people.

The world has watched as the violence has mounted through the spring and summer, as Assad’s government tries to hold on to power by force.

Amid Assad’s campaign of terror, we cannot forget his support for terrorism abroad. Assad’s fall could have significant ramifications across the region: It would weaken Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps, which would no longer have a foothold in Damascus. It would reduce the strength of Hezbollah in Lebanon, which continues to stockpile weapons that it receives from Syria. And it would limit Hamas’s ability to conduct terrorist operations in Gaza.

Our allies in the Arab League and in Turkey could play a critical role in pressuring Assad — they have economic and diplomatic ties with Syria that the United States does not. Congress and the administration should make efforts to leverage these relationships for a comprehensive regional approach to the crisis in Syria. We should also applaud our allies who have rejected the Assad regime.

Meanwhile, the United States should continue to pursue a resolution at the U.N. Security Council condemning the Syrian government’s behavior. Last week’s statement by the council was a positive step but should be bolstered by a strong resolution.

We must also continue to pursue efforts that constrict the regime’s ability to conduct business abroad. The European Union announced a freeze on Syrian assets last week and travel bans on five more military and government officials. The international community must also be willing to examine expanded sanctions on the banking and energy sectors.

Our diplomats, led by Ambassador Robert Ford, have pursued American interests and values abroad. Ford’s recent trip to Hama, in which he met with Syrian citizens and expressed support for their right to peacefully demonstrate, underscored that the most basic American value, the right of democratic representation, is at stake in Syria.

The number of Syrians killed in pursuit of democratic government and basic human dignities since this spring has by some estimates reached 2,000. This does not include those who have been tortured and survived. We honor the memory of Sakher Hallek and hundreds of others by supporting democratic change in Syria.

The writer, a Democrat from Pennsylvania, is chair of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian affairs.

August 6th, 2011, 10:49 am

 

jad said:

Nour,
Try to contact this group, they are very active in the east coast, NY, DC, they might be able to help you:
Syrianemigrants_America at yahoo dot com

August 6th, 2011, 10:55 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Is the syrian currency printed in Syria or in Austria?

August 6th, 2011, 10:55 am

 

Aboud said:

Angry Arab

“Mubarak in the cage: not on Syrian TV

It was noteworthy that Syrian regime TV did not show the scene of Mubarak in the cage. And the Syrian newspapers played down the story.”

August 6th, 2011, 10:56 am

 

EHSANI2 said:

The Syrian currency is printed in Austria

August 6th, 2011, 11:04 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Hizbullah and Iran will try everything in their power. They are scum. Their intention is not to fight Zionism, their only intention is to increase their regional geopolitical power at the cost of ordinary people in Syria and Lebanon.

August 6th, 2011, 11:33 am

 

beaware said:

Syria’s general elections to take place by end of 2011: FM
2011-08-06
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-08/06/c_131033563.htm
DAMASCUS, Aug. 6 (Xinhua) — Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al- Moallem said Saturday that the country’s general elections will take place by the end of this year, adding that it would be “free and fair.”

Al-Moallem made the statement during his meeting with foreign ambassadors in capital Damascus, in which he said the new parliament will represent the aspirations of the Syrian people.

The current parliament’s four-year term has expired earlier this year, and President Bashar al-Assad will set a date for new legislative elections before the end of 2011.

The Syrian leadership is going on with the process of reform, al-Moallem said, adding that all the reform steps announced by the president will be implemented soon.

He voiced the Syrian leadership’s keenness to maintain the security and stability of the country and to put an end to the sabotaging acts.

The Syrian leadership is still affirming that the only way out of the current ordeal is through a national dialogue, Al-Moallem told the ambassadors, adding that in the absence of the national dialogue “because of the negativity of the opposition,” the leadership has to move on with the reform.

The foreign minister’s remarks came as his country is facing an international outcry over the alleged crackdown on anti-government protestors. According to activists, more than 1,700 civilians have been killed since the crisis began in mid-March.

The U.S. State Department on Friday issued a new travel warning for U.S. citizens traveling in Syria, citing the deteriorating situation there due to the escalation of violent clashes between government forces and opposition militants.

The travel warning came one day after the U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton accused the Syrian government of killing more than 2,000 of its own citizens during its alleged ” ongoing brutal crackdown against opposition protesters.”

“We think, to date, the government is responsible for the deaths of more than 2,000 people of all ages,” Clinton said, repeating the U.S. administration’s position that “Assad has lost his legitimacy to govern the Syrian people.”

Activists said some 25 people were killed Friday, while the official media said two police officers were killed by armed men, as thousands of anti-government protestors took to the streets across Syria calling for the downfall of the leadership and demonstrating solidarity with the city of Hama, which has been under military siege since last week.

The Syrian authorities repeatedly brushed off the international pressures as “interference in the country’s affairs” and blamed the violent acts on armed thugs and ultraconservative Muslims who want to establish Islamic emirates nationwide. The authorities pledged that there would be no letup in its crackdown on the gunmen to restore stability and security to the country.

August 6th, 2011, 11:40 am

 

Aboud said:

Washington Post:”Bashar al-Assad must step down”

By Robert P. Casey Jr, chair of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian affairs.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/bashar-al-assad-must-step-down/2011/08/05/gIQAS5oFxI_story.html

August 6th, 2011, 11:41 am

 

hsyrian said:

Another claim by the Muslim Brothers
“”””
Intelligent people know that the MB have not had any significant role in this revolution.
“”””

Certainly Brother ,

I accept your words

Hama is not ( or has never been ) filled with Muslim Brothers.

‘Isam al-‘Attar the founder of the Syrian branch of (Hizb al-Ikhwan al-Muslimun) never set a foot in Hama.

Disclaimers

My ( academic ) question still unanswered :
How many INNOCENT people have been killed by the Terrorists ( Muslim Brothers ) between 1976 and 1982 in Syria.

August 6th, 2011, 11:45 am

 

Aboud said:

@82 I’m not part of the Muslim Brotherhood 🙂

But if you have proof that the MB have been running about Hama, then kindly forward it to Al-DUHnya and Syrian TV. I’m sure junior will reward you in being able to do what his other menhebak trumpets haven’t.

And I’d like to ask the few remaining menhebaks here (the ones who do more than just post newspaper articles, hoping professor Landis will pick them up)

Why is Najati Tayara in jail?

August 6th, 2011, 11:50 am

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

I’m going now to the mother of all demonstrations in Habima Ta7rir Square. Stay tuned. I’m so glad we don’t have Israeli shabbi7a to harass us. Ashaab yurid social justice !
.

August 6th, 2011, 12:04 pm

 

Khalid Tlass said:

@Aboud – When will the ‘Arsaat in the Chambers of Commerce move their pathetic asses ? Their silence is outrageous.

As far as general elections go, any election held will result in a 99.5 % vote in favour of Besho.

August 6th, 2011, 12:17 pm

 

Akbar Palace said:

Amir,

What is the definition of “affordable housing” in most “social justice” circles?

August 6th, 2011, 12:31 pm

 

5 dancing shlomos said:

should syria hasten the downfall of the zionized american regime despite the absence of any real opposition?

any new syrian reforms should include laws such as the patriot act 1 & 2, the military commissions act, the antiterrorism and effective death penalty act.

the syrian govt should have massive spying, evesdropping, wire tapping, and security letters all on the model of great america. not the piddly sort of activity it now has.

syria should introduce laws allowing the govt to invade and destroy any other nation on earth.

the syrian govt, copying the democratic and humane west, should have a world wide gulag of torture and death prisons.

the syrian govt should pass reform laws that legalize the massive, obscene theft of a nation’s wealth by a small percent of bloodsuckers.

the syrian govt needs to enact, not just promise, such laws to emulate the democratic west.

August 6th, 2011, 12:45 pm

 

Majed97 said:

“The Ottomans did not “box” the monorities in “their little corners” as you claim, on the contrary, they discriminated against them horribly. The Christians in particular were targeted. The dicrimination and the targeted groups changed with the change of the Sultans in Istanbul. The French did the same. Under divide and conquer, they made sure the Syrian society was divided along ethnic and religious lines to create allies for themselves.”

No argument there, but that was not the topic de jour. I was addressing how Alawis and other minorities got into positions of power in Syria, specifically the military academy. The French, under their strategy of divide and conquer cited above, are to be credited with that in the early stages following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

“And finally, how do you know what the Islamists might do? And why are we lumping all the Islamist in one group?. I would like to point at the great things that Erdogan was able to accomplish in Turkey. He is an Islamist, right?”

If Erdogan is an Islamist, then he’s a lousy one. Islamists, the way the rest of the world define them, are those who want to impose Islamic laws and culture (Shariaa) on a country. Being a Moslem is not the same as being an Islamist. If Erdogan is a true Islamist, then his Islamic agenda is in its infancy, currently being restricted by the Turkish SECULAR constitution, evidenced by his ongoing confrontation with the Turkish military, the protector of that constitution (a task that was assigned to it by Ataturk). For his vision of an Islamic state to be realized, it will take a long and hard fight with the military and Turkish secularist. In the mean time, his moderate appearance is due to the secular nature of Turkish law, not his Islamic programs. I am not aware of any Shariaa laws being introduced in Turkey, yet.

August 6th, 2011, 12:46 pm

 

5 dancing shlomos said:

testing

August 6th, 2011, 12:46 pm

 

Real Syrian said:

What is happening in Syria is a copy of what had happened in the eightieth of the last century…..
*Al-Assad is alone in his war against Islamic radicals who are making a political striptease to make US invades Syria ….
*False and fake media which broadcast lies against Syria…..
*Arabs are investing their money to create a civil war in Syria…
*Iran supports Al-Assad and Lebanon is under control…..
*Most Syrian including moderate Sunni people support the president and afraid from outsiders who will bring killing and blood not reforms and prosperity.
*Syrian army is united and strong and using a very limited power to eradicate the armed gangs….
To these rebels…. you should know that Hafez Al-Assad is the builder of the strong Syria which was unstable country before his role…..It is a poor thinking for these terrorists to believe that they can destroy what has been built for 40 years …Get up from your dreams as the regime is strong and has many cards to play……

August 6th, 2011, 1:02 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

Thanks Jad,

Coming from the Russian representative at the Nato, it appears to me that it is a way for the Russians to put a bit more pressure on Bashar especially after what we heard from the Russian president calling on Besho to reform or to risk a “sad fate”.

August 6th, 2011, 1:05 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Bashar has been president for 11 years which is more than the two terms suggested by the new draft of the constitution. Even if he is popular,he needs to allow Syrians to choose another president. This obsession with a person does not inspire confidence at all.
I was among the firsts to admit that discounting the Asad and albaath era as a total failure is unfair,but young Syrians want more freedom and the right to choose their leaders.

August 6th, 2011, 1:07 pm

 

Tara said:

Abughassan

Any meaningful reform that does not have term limit is not meaningful. I am sure that will break the heart of mnhebaks but like anything in life, they need to get over it. There is no reform without term limit.

August 6th, 2011, 1:13 pm

 

5 dancing shlomos said:

from angry arab:

arms smuggling to Syria (from Lebanon)
This is a major story in Al-Akhbar and As-Safir. Of course, it is not a story for March 14 (Hariri) media because the men involved are allegedly active with the Hariri political movement. Lebanese Army intelligence uncovers a major smuggling operation from Beirut to Syria. No reference to it in the Western press.

arms to lebanon from ????

August 6th, 2011, 1:15 pm

 

Haytham Khoury said:

We are not talking about reform. We are talking about change

August 6th, 2011, 1:16 pm

 

Abughassan said:

I am the product of a mixed marriage,one parent is a sunni and the other is an alawi,and we happen to have more than 1/2 dozen mixed marriages in our extended family.
I am privileged enough to know quite a bit about Alawis and Sunnis . Habib’s claim that Alawis did not suffer from poor treatment and discrimination is not supported by numerous testimonies I collected from Alawi elders and even some Sunnis,however,this is not an excuse to practice reverse discrimination especially when it comes to appointing top leaders in the army and security forces. What I personally would like to see is a new system where minorities are fairly represented in the government and a new set of laws that protect minority rights. I could not care less if the new president is alawi,Sunni or Christian but we need to end the era of absolute power and start holding officials accountable.
(until the 60s,some simple-minded urban Syrians believed that alawis are savage mountain people who would eat anything including human flesh,this is not a joke,it is a fact that I personally verified)..

August 6th, 2011, 1:21 pm

 

Aboud said:

Al-Jazeera interview with the Swiss journalist who was in Hama during the army’s invasion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0Euag_8CuU&feature=player_embedded

He was in Hama for ten days before the invasion. He says there were no gangs or armed groups.

And people wonder why junior will never allow free and fair media in the country.

August 6th, 2011, 1:23 pm

 

Tara said:

Abughassan,

I could not care less either . A Mickey mouse would cut it for me. The president could be of any religion as long he does not hold absolute power and as long as he is changed by the constituion after 2 terms.

August 6th, 2011, 1:31 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Alwatan newspaper,owned by Rami I believe,has not been accessible online for the last 2 days.

August 6th, 2011, 1:36 pm

 

Revlon said:

Dear Joshua,
The videoclip that you posted is a cut of the original. It shows proceedings of the tribal meeting that came on the heel of the abduction of Sheikh Shuyookh Syrian tribes Sheikh nawaf AlBasheer.
بيان العشائر في دير الزور ‫29721474

Aug 3, 2011

Here is a transcription of some of the speakers statements
Young tribal member (5 minutes)
– No regime will sign to its surrender.
– Th soldiers, shabbeha and foreign merceneries besieging our city are terrified of us. They think of us as cannibals. This plays into our hands!
– The city of deirAlZor did not have and now does not have arms, as they claim.
– We will be open to negotiating with the regime (About the Sheikh’s arrest). We will extend one hand and guard ourselves with a stick in the other.
– The regime have succeded in subjugating us because we lost faith in God and Jihad. We have regaind them back. There is no going back
– Our elements are urged to head to our strategic points in the city. We have selected them so as our spies can provide advance warning for any impending threat from the regime forces.

Sheikh
– A couiple of days ago a group of us, including lawyers and Doctors met with a delegation from the Army
– Our demands were as follows:
o The release of all political prisnors, prior to the arrest of Sheikh Nawaf
o The withdrawal of Army and security forces from the city.
– The army negotiator replied that they agreed with some tribal benefactors on granting the tribes 20 license plates for automobiles and 5000 job opportunities.
– We rejected their offer as silly.
– The negotiating officer telephoned Officer Riadh Shaleesh and informed him of the tribal meeting demands.
– Shaleesh’s response: The army is in a mission and shall not withdraw.
– The Sheikh concluded by saying: By tomorrow, if our demands are not met we will bring our arms and go down to the city.

A religious tribal member:
– A religious prelude
– Jihad is part of the heritage of the Islamic Umma
– Our Sunni brothers make up the majority of the army; We want them out of the army.
– The regime are forcing our Sunni brothers to kill each other by sending Homsi’s to Kill Deiri’s and Hasakawi’s to kill in dar3awi’s. This should stop.
– We want peace. But if Jihad is forced on us so be it!

Sheikh conclusion remarks
– We welcome and respect the statements of the members
– This regime does not appreciate our peaceful stance and is not serious about dialogue.
– We have been pleading for dialogue for the last 5 months! Alas this regime is bent on staying in power.
– Frankly, as for 3alawis, the mind set of their professors and shepards in this conflict are one and the same.
– Notwithstanding, we have a committee to keep the channel of dialogue, while we stay alert with our guns to defend ourselves.
– We either live proud or die martyrs defending our honour and territories.
– We are proud tribes; when dar3a pleaded for help they addressed the tribes of our city first!
– I ask the able to donate for our cause.

Personal impressions:
– This is a prototypical example of a form of collective councel that is thousands of years old.
– Nowhere in any city in Syria a pre-announced, and organised gatherings can take place under the watchful eyes of the regime.
– It was attended by over a hundred members
– The speakers were representative of the young revolutionists, religious members, and the the tribal chief.
– One of the members had a machine gun strapped to his shoulder. This is nothing recent and has nothing to do with the revolution . They have always been armed.
It is part of their way of life.
– The speech of all members was defiant, with tribal and religious undertones.
This does not represent a intercurrent Salafi trend or infiltration.
It is a true reflection of the conservative mindset of the tribes of Syria.
– The decision is a declaration of rebellion until the approval of the demands of the tribes.

August 6th, 2011, 1:41 pm

 

Abughaasan said:

Aboud,my hot-blooded witty friend,let us not dwell on this issue since the truth is not exclusively owned by either side.the regime carries most of the blame but there is a lot of weapons in Syria,we both know that.we do not need a Swiss guy to inform us about Syria.
The regime intentionally banned foreign press, and most of us know why.

August 6th, 2011, 1:42 pm

 

Tara said:

Aboud@101

Thanks for the link. Shortly will hear that Switzerlans Is part of the western conspiracy against Besho. The answer to prohibiting free press from entering Syria is clear: the regime is simply hiding the truth.

Additionally, if the \” armed gangs\” are present, how come we hear nothing about their activities except when the regime is invading a town?

August 6th, 2011, 1:47 pm

 

Haytham Khoury said:

Dear Dr. Landis:

You are completely right as regard to the importance of establishment of a transition council in Syria. Please find below an excerpt of a paper sent to the Antalya Conference on may 29th, 2011 with title “The Urgency for a Transition Council in Syria”. Unfortunately, the Conference was not able to adopt it because of the lack of preparations and the lack of high-caliber attendees.

[Thus, to reduce the death toll among the Syrian people, it is imperative to accelerate the regime demise. In my opinion, the best way to reach this goal is by forming a “transition council” that can lead the political fight against the regime inside the country and at the international scene. One may ask: “how this transition council would help accelerate the end of this regime?”.

First, this “transition council” will help formulate concrete political objectives for the popular uprising. This formulation will further ignite this uprising and provide the demonstrators with additional courage and persistence. The demonstrators will feel that they are making history and a positive outcome for their sacrifices is looming.

Second, there is still a sizable portion of the Syrian people that wishes the end of the regime, but it is not participating in this popular uprising. This hesitation is mainly because this portion feels that the revolution if “faceless” and wonders concerning the political alternative that would replace the Assad regime. The presence of a thoughtful political face for the combative body that can lay out a clear perspective regarding the future of the country may encourage this segment of the Syrian people to at least align with, or fully join, the revolution against the vicious regime.

Third, the formation of a “transition council” will increase the regime panic, leading it to commit more mistakes and to further exhaustion of its energy, which, consequently, will accelerate of its demise. We saw such panic with every political move carried out by the opposition, as it happened during the Damascus Spring and after the formation of “The Damascus declaration for Democratic Change in Syria”. Despite is panic the regime was able to curb the first by closing its political forums and to impede the second by persecuting most of its leaders living inside Syria. What differs this time is that the council will be formed outside the country, thus beyond the regime’s reach. Further, the regime is already overwhelmed by the demonstrations taking place almost in all Syrian cities, making this council a heavy burden that could break the regime’s back.

Fourth, the formation of such council will address many of the international community worries and concerns. This council will have the diplomatic mission to visit many countries in the world, including Russia and China, to convey the aspirations of the Syrian people and explain the opposition political vision as how it will work to fulfill these aspirations and to build a country that is respected and has good standing in the international arena. If this mission is successful, that would answer many of the international community questions regarding the future of Syria post Bashar al-Assd and would put the last nail in the regime’s coffin.

Undoubtedly, the end of the Assad regime is approaching. But, the faster the regime dies, the less suffering the Syrian people will experience. For this reason, all efforts should be committed to accelerate regime’s demise and it is upon the Syrian opposition to make a historic decision.]

http://haytham-khoury2.blogspot.com/2011/07/urgency-for-transition-council-in-syria_14.html

http://haytham-khoury.blogspot.com/2011/07/lurgence-dun-conseil-de-transition-en.html

August 6th, 2011, 1:53 pm

 

Revlon said:

Ayman 3ilwani and Qutayba Qabbesh fell martyrs to Jr’s brutality.
Ayman was shot while trying to rescue an injured

Al Fati7a upon their soul,
May God bless their families with solace, and empoer them with patience.

حماة الأبية – الشهيدين أيمن علواني وقتيبة قبش
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsZZQwWpfmY&feature=player_embedded
Uploaded by OmawiTV on Aug 6, 2011

August 6th, 2011, 2:09 pm

 

ss said:

Assad still strong, supported by army and significant chunk of the syrian people. Oppositions with no leadership, fragmented, and lost. The streets are controlled by gangs, mostly radicals who are armed. Assad does not have to step down for bunch of terrorists. The opposition has to accept that restoring order and moving in negotiations and talks is the only way to get us all out of this mess. The oppositions should aknowledge the fact of the armed rebels

August 6th, 2011, 2:12 pm

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Thank you Ehsani2
The reason I asked this question is because there are reports that Syria ordered the printing of 100 billion Lira,using bills 1000 denomination, how much this will devalue the Lira?, if any?
it is supposed to be delivered on 27th of august.is the new prints will look the same as the old,will it worth different?would the old bill worth different?
I assume that the lira will drop

August 6th, 2011, 2:12 pm

 

ss said:

President Assad has the army, the minorities, and part of the conservative at his side. I don’t understand why he should resign if there is no upscale demonstration against him including an uprise all over Damascus and Aleppo. Just because it happened that you don’t like him, that not sufficient reason to step down.

The idea of international intervention in Syria is an idea and not reality. There are many players in the region. The international intervention in Libya has been a total failure. HA in Lebanon will attack Israel. Iran will target US bases in Iraq and Afghanistan. Syria is weakened by the internal unrest but the regime may use what it has as a last measure before falling. This is too much a sacrifice that the west can afford now. Moreover another war will really bring the US economy into further depression more than what we already have.

The west is watching the videos posted here and there. Just look at the video posted in this post where it sows radical islamists, and one of them looks exactly like bin laden, shouting Allah wa Akbar, calling for Jihad. Threatening minorities. Why in the world would anybody want to bring a secular regime down and replace it by radical one?

Many videos have emerged as a proof of the criminal acts and radical behavior of the armed thugs and gangs in the streets of Syria. We are seeing people shouting Allah wa Akbar, and hungry for more blood shed. These retarded radical islamist should not determine the future of secular Syria.

The united nation and the international community will most likely accuse Assad as a war criminal and bring him to international court……lol….well let them come to Syria and take him out. The same thing happened to Omar Bashir of Sudan and they were not able to drag him to that court. I believe the west is mounting pressure and Assad knows that well.

August 6th, 2011, 2:14 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

This site has become Aboud comment.he is on day and night,I don’t even think he goes to the bathroom.he is being assisted by Ubo umer the terrorist,who wished that the soldiers would have been eaten by fish in alassi,his other commander is Aboali .why in the world would any one waste a minute talking to such a crew?.you get 0% knowledge from them,you get 100% chance of getting insulted by them,nothing personal but I hate all of them,they are all mean people,if that is being Syrian,then thank god I have another citizenship.Joshua treats Aboud as his spoiled child,he lets him get away with insulting every one even god and Jesus (remember his famous statement:Jesus f..k god),I really think that he is his friend,and just analyzing Aboud language and stupidity pattern I think he could very likely be Ammar.Any way this site is a wast of time.
Abughassan Cont to be a class and one of the only real syrians on this site,I will
Vote him for a president if he choose to be.Revlon is typical manipulative Islamic wolf,trying to cover himself in nice sheep dress.Tara is willing to accept that Bashar was behind killing 31special force soldiers in Afghanstan,but when it comes to crimes committed by her terrorists friends she wants no doubt evidence.
Any one who has a life don’t waste your time here.

August 6th, 2011, 2:16 pm

 

Revlon said:

Defection of an army unit in Rastan to Join the FSA
انشقاق الملازم الأول عمر أحمد الشمسي و عناصر من الجيش

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZMNOPPtkGo&feature=player_embedded
Uploaded by a198123 on Aug 5, 2011

August 6th, 2011, 2:17 pm

 

ss said:

Many videos have emerged as a proof of the criminal acts and radical behavior of the armed thugs and gangs in the streets of Syria. We are seeing people shouting Allah wa Akbar, and hungry for more blood shed. These retarded radical islamist should not determine the future of secular Syria.

President Assad has the army, the minorities, and part of the conservative at his side. I don’t understand why he should resign if there is no upscale demonstration against him including an uprise all over Damascus and Aleppo. Just because it happened that you don’t like him, that not sufficient reason to step down

The west is watching the videos posted here and there. Just look at the video posted in this post where it sows radical islamists, and one of them looks exactly like bin laden, shouting Allah wa Akbar, calling for Jihad. Threatening minorities. Why in the world would anybody want to bring a secular regime down and replace it by radical one?

International intervention in Syria is an idea and not reality. There are many players in the region. The international intervention in Libya has been a total failure. HA in Lebanon will attack Israel. Iran will target US bases in Iraq and Afghanistan. Syria is weakened by the internal unrest but the regime may use what it has as a last measure before falling. This is too much a sacrifice that the west can afford now. Moreover another war will really bring the US economy into further depression more than what we already have.

The united nation and the international community will most likely accuse Assad as a war criminal and bring him to international court……lol….well let them come to Syria and take him out. The same thing happened to Omar Bashir of Sudan and they were not able to drag him to that court. I believe the west is mounting pressure and Assad knows that well.

August 6th, 2011, 2:17 pm

 

Revlon said:

Defiant Iman AlBaghdadi addresses the Syrian ambassador in Stockholm

August 6th, 2011, 2:26 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Iman comes out as an articulate defiant woman,most Syrians especially women would look favorably at her style even if they disagree with her politics.She presents a positive image of educated modern Syrian women,an image that is not liked by militant islamists who want women to be covered and stay home. Do you think Iman stands a chance if islamists emerge as the leaders in a new Syria?
Overall,I liked the link,thanks revlon,but I am not sure where ladies like her will fit if we fail to come up with a progressive tolerant post Asad system. Iman is a threat ,not just to the regime but to militant islamists too.

August 6th, 2011, 2:44 pm

 

Revlon said:

Confessions of reserve soldiers
They were ordered bny colonel Mohammad Dandan to carry arms and infiltrate a demonstration.
– The acting reservists are three
– The film shooter is an army personnel driving a taxi
– The clip would be provided to AlDunia TV as evidence of existance of armed infiltrators.

When one soldier was asked whether he really knows what is going on; He answered yes.
He said they are in touch by virtue of their mobiles, as they have no access to TV or radio in their units!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKAaEZznVSM&feature=player_embedded#at=147
القبض على مجموعة تحمل السلاح من أجل تصويرهم بديرالزور

August 6th, 2011, 2:51 pm

 

N.Z. said:

How brainy some of the comments are, specifically those that foresee chaos and destruction once this ruling family disappear from the Syrian radar. Well get informed.

This is a full scale civil war by Assad and his supporters on the people who took to the streets demanding for a Syria, free of tyranny. The two sides are armed and dangerous. The opposition and protesters are armed with chanters, these are explosives, pianist parents are a ticking danger, artists, cartoonists and freelance own pens of mass destruction. Innocent teenagers will grow guns on trees, eventually they will threat Syria’s gods, the Assads’.

One major difference between the two. The peoples’ power is a legitimate force, their demands are legitimate, and their bravery is legendary. The government power is illegitimate and their demands are dull and null.

Time to think outside the assad box, you’ve been trapped for so long. It is time to move on.

August 6th, 2011, 2:54 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Salamiah, an Ismaili Syrian city, are demanding for their freedom. Oooops they are a minority, no?

Agha Khan is anti Assad. This is a heavy international weight behind this legitimate Revolution. Yes. Syrians are revolting. It is no longer an uprising.

August 6th, 2011, 3:01 pm

 

Tara said:

Kandahar

Kindly give me your opinion in regard to Iman baghdadi.

Most SC pro regime accuse all anti regime to be MB/salafist. I was once accused of not only being an MB but even a CHIEF MB. Why is it so unfathomable to understand that you can dress and behave similar to Iman and be anti regime?
Why is it so difficult for Mnhebsks to accept the legitimacy of this revolution? I always said sinister elements, people who take up arms to defend themselves, as well as people who will kill to excute revenge are inevitable in any revolution, but why is it so hard for someone like yourself who witnessed the oppression just from the mere fact of having lived in Syria to acknowledge that a revolution is a natural consequence of 40years old brutal oppression? Calling for “Jihad” scares me as much as it scare you. Why is one man worth a country?

August 6th, 2011, 3:09 pm

 

Revlon said:

#116 Dear Abughassan,
You said:
“I am not sure where ladies like her will fit if we fail to come up with a progressive tolerant post Asad system. Iman is a threat ,not just to the regime but to militant islamists too”

I share your high regard for this young lady.

Iman is a liberal and outspoken lady. She and her likes appeal to those who share her views and like her style.
On the other hand, conservative activists will appeal to those who share their views.

Diversity ought to be viewed as a guaranteur instead of threat to harmony.

Activism shall not cease with the departure of this regime.
It will be empowered by a new consitution that guarantees basic human rights and freedoms and protected by an able justice system.

Young activists , like pro-change on this blog, dedicate their time and efforts to achieve freedom for themselves, their loved ones and all Syrian citizens.

They are not seeking guarantees to be selected as political representatives in Post-Asad Syria.
Such shall be decided later by the free choice of the electorate.

August 6th, 2011, 3:26 pm

 

N.Z. said:

From Twitter:

Dr. Waleed Al Bunni & his 2 sons (18 & 14) were arrested @ 7 p.m Damas time by #Syria|n Sec. Forces. I plead with the gov: ENOUGH REFORMS!

August 6th, 2011, 3:28 pm

 

Mango said:

73. JAD
خبراء في الاتحاد الأوروبي اتفقوا على توسيع العقوبات ضد سورية ليشمل قطاعات النفط والغاز والقطاع المصرفي.
خليهم يشربوا البحر ! أولى بهم أن ينتشلوا أنفسهم من الغرق الاقتصادي !

August 6th, 2011, 3:56 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Tara
I don’t think that iman represents what this is about.you have been watching events,women have not been involved or barely involved,usually with carbage bag uniforms.if you talk about Stockholm 99%of syrians in swelled support the government,actually 150 of them travelled to kamishli in support of Syria recently.
You can’t cover the sun with your fingers, you know very well that this is Islamic revolution:it has Islamic mind,Islamic heart,Islamic uniform,Islamic gun,Islamic swords and Islamic chants.you and your friend terrorists know very well that you are way from taking over Syria,your double standards are so obvious:crimes committed by your terrorists friends,you need a DNA evidence,other crimes you don’t need evidence,even Americans killed in afghans tan today you will by assad responsibility.This site is not for intellectuals,it is for deintellectualing people and turn them into fried brainless hateful dummies like Aboud,Ubo umber or Aboalli.it is very clear that dr landis supports this chemical reaction.
As far as Revlon and NZ they are basically willing to do any thing to get them into Syria destruction ,no wonder if ther masters were friends of kadam,Refat…and ther bus is a star on isreali TV.
If you have any forms of life,don’t wast your time here.

August 6th, 2011, 4:04 pm

 

N.Z. said:

From Twitter:

فقط في سوريا جماعات مسلحة أصولية, لا إسم لها, و لا تخرج ببيانات, و تحفر قبور جماعية.

-نصيحة للشبيحة وعبيد بشورة من النبيحة شو رأيكن تمرقوا شي نهار بلا ما تعبدوا الحمار وتجربوا تكونوا أحرار كانت النصيحة بجمل وهلأ ببشار #Syria

Al Assad fortune reaches $70 billions!! من عرق جبينه youtube.com/watch?v=ro4QHS

دمشق|| انطلاق مظاهرة في شارع الثورة وانتشار كثيف للامن في ساحة

ما الذي فعله حزب البعث بسوريا والسوريين والجيش السوري؟ عنصرية البعث وطائفيته، عبدالناصر يتحدث http://bit.ly/qek7Tj #Syria

كيف باع حافظ الأسد الجولان مقابل حكم سوريا http://t.co/gtVzVIh”

السيد الرئيس : الدولة تقوم بدورها من خلال الإصلاح و الخدمات
lak tuz feek ya bashar

أظهرت هذه الثورة أجمل وأطهر وأروع ما في الشعب السوري وأظهرت إيمانه لكنها كشفت عن أحقر وأنذل وأفظع ما في نظام العمالة ومرتزقته وأعوانه

ياجماعة اهالي الجولان المحتل يطلبون تدخل الجيش العربي السوري – ريتويت لو سمحتم

عاجل /العربيه/20 الف متظاهر في سراقب في ادلب بعد التراويح

شكرأ تونس لأنك علمتينا أن الإيمان ليس جنوناً أو غباء وشكراً مصر لأنك نبهتينا بأن تونس ليست استثناء

النظام السوري: نستطيع تأجيج الشيعه في دول الخليج ضد دولهم التعليق: وهل الشيعه لعبه بايدك عشان يتبعونك يابشار الجحش

Next time you hear a world leader talking about freedom & democracy or asking Assad to reform, just shove your shoe into
their mouth.

اكيد ان الله معهم وانتم معكم الشيطان واعوانه من بشار الكلب واخوه

August 6th, 2011, 4:05 pm

 

N.Z. said:

“خليهم يشربوا البحر !” or they can drink mango(juice) it is more exotic

August 6th, 2011, 4:07 pm

 

jad said:

الإرهابيون في دير الزور يريدون تفجير خطوط النفط
http://youtu.be/hJc8xNHARSQ

August 6th, 2011, 4:16 pm

 

jad said:

تعذيب و إكراه عنصر أمن على الاعتراف بوجود إيرانين
http://youtu.be/qBOb_f7rfPA

August 6th, 2011, 4:18 pm

 

Abughassan said:

The time for reform has passed. If Turkey wants to help it can mediate an exit for the regime heads instead of waiting for them to do something they can not do: reform
The time also has come for the army chiefs and all minorities and supporters of Asad to formulate a peaceful exit from this mess. Enough blood shed.

August 6th, 2011, 4:33 pm

 

jad said:

مصادرة شحنة أسلحة قادمة من لبنان بمركز الدبوسية الحدودي

تمكن عناصر الجمارك بمركز الدبوسية الحدودي يوم السبت من مصادرة شحنة أسلحة قادمة بسيارة شحن كبيرة قادمة للقطر من لبنان.

وقال مدير جمارك حمص لسيريانيوز انه “نتيجة للاشتباه بالبيان والتدقيق والفحص الدقيق لكل السيارات القادمة والمغادرة للقطر على مدار الساعة وليقظة عناصر الجمارك والعناصر الأخرى بالمركز المذكور تم الاشتباه بسيارة محملة بقطع مستعملة للسيارات بشكل عبور ترانزيت حيث عثر تحت صناديق قطع السيارات كميات كبيره من الأسلحة مخبأه بشكل متقن من الإخفاء”.
وتبين أن الأسلحة عبارة عن قناصات متطورة جدا وأسلحة وبنادق لإطلاق قنابل مسيله للدموع تجاوز عددها الـ 250 قطعه أسلحة مختلفة الأنواع والأحجام والاستعمال.
واضاف مدير جمارك حمص انه “تم أيضا مصادرة أنواع كبيرة من الأدوية للهلوسة والحبوب المخدرة من ضمن الشحنة إضافة إلى عجين صواعق وفتيل لإعداد التفجير والسيارة لبنانيه والسائق لباني الجنسية”.
وأجريت أعمال الضبط اللازم للشاحنة وصولا لإعداد الملف اللازم ومصادرتها واستكمال التحقيقات مع السائق.
يشار الى ان سورية شهدت في الاشهر الاخيرة ضبط العديد من شحنات الاسلحة المهربة للداخل من العراق ولبنان.
هيثم يوسف- سيريانيوز

http://syria-news.com/readnews.php?sy_seq=135892

August 6th, 2011, 4:33 pm

 

Aboud said:

YES! Wohooo! Aboud Comment! #112

(edited for name calling) would you like some cheese with that epic whine? 🙂

Majedkhaldoon, as much as I’d love to say that the printing of new money means the regime has run out of cash, the printing was planned months ago to replace the 1000 and 500 lira bills with new ones. We already have nice shiny new 50,100 and 200 bills, but they only just got around to printing the 500 and 1000 denominations.

When the old currency is withdrawn, the amount of paper in circulation is *supposed* to stay the same.

Abughassan “Iman is a threat ,not just to the regime but to militant islamists too. ”

Agree, but the young people out in the streets are not risking their lives for an Iran style theocracy, where “Economics is for donkeys” as the head donkey once said. Of the 1,600 victims of the regime, I want the menhebaks to name me some who had MB or militant Islamist background. Otherwise, kindly shut your traps about this being an MB plot (not you Abu Ghassan, you’re cool).

“,and just analyzing Aboud language and stupidity pattern I think he could very likely be Ammar”

Who the heck is Ammar? If my IP is within 500 km of this Ammar, then I invite Joshua to say so 🙂

August 6th, 2011, 4:35 pm

 

beaware said:

Ankara must lead the pressure against Damascus
Friday, August 5, 2011
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=ankara-must-lead-the-pressure-against-damascus-2011-08-05
Washington’s ineffective Syrian policy once more displays how much weaker the U.S. has gotten since its occupation of Iraq in 2003. Then, the mighty U.S. military deposed a strong dictator within weeks. Eight years later, the same Washington now is feeling a great pressure from within and out to do anything meaningful to prevent the Bashar al-Assad regime to stop killing its own people to little avail.

Only a few months earlier, during the beginning of the Libya uprising, things were simpler for Washington. The Franco/British axis led the European coalition; the Arab League extended an unprecedented back up for NATO to intervene in a Muslim country. Moammar Gadhafi further helped international consciousness to be garnered when he threatened publicly to wipe out rebels in Benghazi and consequently assured a rapid United Nations Security Council resolution to be passed to legitimize the military action.

Syria has proved to be a much bigger challenge. First off, the Libyan intervention did not go as well as many hoped it would. Despite heavy NATO bombardment for months, the civil war has dragged into its fourth month, while Gaddafi is still clinging to power with every possible means in his disposal. On Wednesday, even though Chris Stevens, U.S. representative to the Transitional National Council, or TNC, drew a rosier picture for Libya during his briefing at the State Department, extending warfare makes it much harder for the West to have a stronger leverage against Damascus. Responding to my question, Stevens cited Qatar, United Arab Emirates, and Turkey as fellow Muslim majority countries, whose support TNC is very pleased with. Stevens did not mention the Arab League, neither whether the League is doing anything to change its image or to pressure the Assad regime to stop its carnage.

One senior State Department official argued this week that the reason U.S. still does not call Assad to step down openly is because it is not sure if such a call would make any difference on the ground. Simply, it appears from these background talks that the current U.S. administration cares more about the U.S.’ own reputation than supporting the legitimate demands of Syrian people.

In reality, in the face of its dismal economic numbers, scratched military sources around the world and very much dysfunctional government with its endless fights, even the most hawkish American experts dare to advocate for any military action for Syria. Sanctions to isolate the Syrian regime seem to be the only policy option, at least for the foreseeable future. The Assad regime, on the other hand, as if they all are very much aware of the grim fiscal and political situation of both European Union and U.S., is taking the advantage to continue crashing peaceful protesters.

Senator Lindsey Graham, during an interview this week, stated that Turkey should lead the international coalition of pressure on Syrian regime, since the U.S. is in no position to hurt Syria by sanctions, which is the argument U.S. Ambassador to Damascus Robert Ford also essentially backed up during his Senate hearing confirmation. The spokesperson of the senator did not seem to have anything else to add when I contacted, so I asked both White House Spokesman Jay Carney and the State Department Spokesman Mark Toner whether U.S. sees Turkey leading such pressure against Syrian regime as Graham described. Both Carney and Toner praised the Turkish role and cooperation towards Syria, though fell short elaborating senator’s argument further.

Economically sound, politically stable Turkey which receives one of the highest approval ratings from Arab people in terms of its leadership, is uniquely positioned to do much to isolate Assad and even to lead such coalition of pressure against him.

Syria is a case for Turkey to assert its moral leadership in the region which was tainted badly earlier in the decade with its close comradeship with many of the region’s dictators.

Otherwise, in all seriousness, this time Washington seems to have nothing to offer for stopping a massacre.

August 6th, 2011, 4:38 pm

 

Sheila said:

To my very dear #77. hsyrian,
Thank you for making me laugh. If you ever met me, you would laugh too for calling me a ” Muslim Brothers”.
Back to the important point: Have you been to Turkey lately?. If you have, you would know what I am talking about. I have been to Turkey many, many times over the years. The change in Turkey is incredible. When I was a little girl living in Aleppo, the Turks used to come to my home town to buy the stuff that we Syrians put in the garbage. They literally had nothing. Thanks to our wonderful Assad Regime, Syrians now go to Turkey to buy what the Turks put in the garbage. Since Erdogan took power, Turkey moved forward by leaps and bounds. Go see for your self and then talk to me to say you are sorry.

Claim typical from Muslim Brothers

“””
I would like to point at the great things that Erdogan was able to accomplish in Turkey. He is an Islamist, right?
“””

Reality

Erdogan is an Islamist and he has done nothing great
but he is trying very hard to change the Turkish secular constitution for an Islamist one.

He is sending his “veiled ” daughter to a foreign school instead of a secular Turkish school.
He is “dismissing” officers in the Turkish Army , the last secular state organization.
….

Disclaimers

Lie travels at the speed of light until it hits the mirror of truth.

August 6th, 2011, 4:39 pm

 

beaware said:

Dubious portrayal of Syrian events
Friday, August 5, 2011
Bahadır Dinçer

The biased media coverage of the events in Syria seems to intentionally downplay the real issues at stake by focusing on the claims of conflict between the Shiite and Sunni population.

The military and regime are depicted as the saviors of the people. On the other hand, the Syrian people who have deployed peaceful means of protest with no reference to sectarian ideology are shown as armed gangs. However, the current situation is actually an issue of “victimization.” In reality, the scenario of “sectarian conflict” reflects the attempts to legitimize certain interests rooted in the status quo. The winners and rewards of such a scenario must be analyzed. First and foremost, if a sectarian conflict erupts, the center of the struggle will shift. This will allow time for the Syrian regime to relax.

Moreover, the possibility of a sectarian conflict doesn’t only serve the regional powers, but also certain global ones. When their inaction is questioned, they can justify it by saying “they are struggling with primordial religious problems, they have no legitimate demands.” Furthermore, the rhetoric of “sectarian conflict” that fragments the Middle East can also please those that don’t want the Muslim world to unite. In this sense, the expansionary policies of the Iranian regime can indirectly aid those that have certain interests in the region.

The latest coverage of the situation is trying to build the grounds for the intensification of a sectarian conflict. Those that aren’t comfortable with the regime’s current situation are trying to change the agenda and spark an actual sectarian conflict.

Time is not on Turkey’s side

A stronger Turkish position seems to be blocked intentionally. Certain factors are influencing the Turkish decision-making process: the indecisiveness of the international community, the negative scenarios about the future of change in Syria and expectations that Bashar al-Assad’s regime can survive the current crisis.

The situation in Syria is at a critical point for Turkey. The international community has remained silent to this day, giving tacit consent to Assad’s actions, thus increasing the possibility of sectarian conflict. As each day passes, the risks of taking firm action are increasing immensely. Now, our attempts to sympathize with the Syrian victims may be interpreted as a preference for a certain sect. This increases our possibility of being isolated from the international community in regards to the Syrian issue, and thus increases the vulnerability of our foreign relations. For example, we may face a direct conflict with Iran. It must be asked whether the United States had anticipated this while it remained uninvolved by saying “there is nothing to do; we do not know what to do” which also puzzled Turkey.

We must also remember that the events in Hama are not new. There have been similar operations in and attacks on many other cities, thought they haven’t received such attention in the media. Yet, the events in Hama have found large coverage in the international media. It is not difficult to understand that the Baath Party’s main aim in Hama is to spark further sectarian conflict. The fact that they have tried to provoke the Sunnis on the eve of Ramadan is in accordance with such a policy.

At this point, we can only hope that Turkey increases its efforts in bringing the “real” issues to the world’s agenda, and that the people of Syria don’t fall for the ugly games of the Baath regime.

*Bahadır Dinçer is currently a researcher in International Strategic Research Organization, or USAK, Center for Middle East Studies.

August 6th, 2011, 4:41 pm

 

Abughassan said:

I do not buy the rumors that hizbullah and Iranian fighters shot on syrian protestors,not because I trust the regime but because Syria has enough shooters and thugs and does not need help. The charges circulated yesterday are politically motivated,a lot of people outside Syria support this uprising because they want Iran’s influence to be reduced and hizbullah to be weakened. Syrians for the most part are revolting for internal reasons. Foreign meddling in Syria’s affair is a fact that does not negate another fact: this is a bad regime and it must go.

August 6th, 2011, 4:44 pm

 

hsyrian said:

False claim from the Muslim Brother on SC
“”””
Al-Jazeera interview with the Swiss journalist who was in Hama during the army’s invasion.

He was in Hama for ten days before the invasion. He says there were no gangs or armed groups.
“”””

It is fairly obvious that Gaetan Vannay (Swiss journalist from Geneva ) has been sponsored by the Muslim Brothers in Syria.
They have shown him that and who they wanted and they have told him many tales.

http://info.tsr.ch/rsr/pdf/Carnet_de_route_Gaetan_Vannay.pdf

For obvious reasons , they did not show him the arms and the armed gangs and they did not bring him into Homs.

Disclaimers

Anonymous people claiming that I am a member of the Baath Party ( traitor , sha.., men.. ) when I disagree with them , cannot be called anything else than Muslim Brothers.

August 6th, 2011, 4:49 pm

 

Aboud said:

JAD,you and the other Baathists, stop insulting our intelligence. Do you have any idea how many holes the Syrian-Lebanese border has? How do you think foreign reporters are consistently able to slip in and out of Syria. What idiot would bring in weapons through a customs border when there are so many smuggling routes available?

Oh, and they carried “hallucinogenic” pills as well *facepalm*

August 6th, 2011, 4:50 pm

 

hsyrian said:

False claim from one of the Muslim Brothers on SC
\”\”\”\”
Al-Jazeera interview with the Swiss journalist who was in Hama during the army’s invasion.

He was in Hama for ten days before the invasion. He says there were no gangs or armed groups.
\”\”\”\”

It is fairly obvious that Gaetan Vannay (Swiss journalist from Geneva ) has been sponsored by the Muslim Brothers in Syria.
They have shown him that and who they wanted and they have told him many tales.

http://info.tsr.ch/rsr/pdf/Carnet_de_route_Gaetan_Vannay.pdf

For obvious reasons , they did not show him the arms and the armed gangs and they did not bring him into Homs.

Disclaimers

Anonymous people claiming that I am a member of the Baath Party ( traitor , sha.., men.. ) when I disagree with them , cannot be called anything else than Muslim Brothers.

August 6th, 2011, 4:58 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Tara,this is the most critical time in Syria’s modern history. Many people,me included,could not quite understand what is going on and where to go,I am glad I finally found peace.
If you think Syria’s problems will be finished when the regime is changed,think again.
You can not move a third world country that lived under dictatorship for 48 years to the club of democratic and civilized nations by just removing the president. Many serious challenges are coming: economic hardship,Islamist threat,political divisions and revenge attacks by both sides. The future is uncertain if the regime is changed but at least we will have a chance,but without a regime change,the future is bleak and bloody.

August 6th, 2011, 4:59 pm

 

Sheila said:

#100 Abughassan,
I want to thank you for being one of the few people on this blog who are trying real hard to be impartial and open minded.
I wanted to address Tara’s question about discrimination. I agree with you Abughassan, there was discrmination agaist Alawiis, but in my view, it had more to do with social status and education than with religion. The poor sunnis, Kurds and christians were subjected to the same types of discrimination. At one point, most maids in Aleppo were poor Alawii girls “bought” from the mountains. It is so hard for me to say this or even believe it, but it is true. In the turn of the 20th century, people in Syria bought girls to work as maids in homes. Not all were Alawiis, but most were. It was poverty that pushed these people back then to sell their own flesh and blood. If there is one good thing about the Assad regime, it is that it brought prosperity and most importantly, education to the Alawii community. Today, along with the thugs and Shabiha, we have a sizable number of highly educated and respectable Alawiis. There is always a silver lining.

August 6th, 2011, 5:03 pm

 

Aboud said:

@136 Oh dear God above. You link to a PDF of Vannay’s journals, and then say something absurd like “It is fairly obvious that Gaetan Vannay (Swiss journalist from Geneva ) has been sponsored by the Muslim Brothers in Syria.”

Seriously? I mean, who exactly has been taking hallucinogenic pills here? You can’t respond to a Swiss…a Swiss journalist’s first hand testimony on the atrocities he saw, so you claim he is sponsored by the “Muslim [sic] Brothers”?

You know, in Switzerland, they don’t go and buy trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim (who on Al-Arabiya this evening came waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down from his self righteous mountain. Someone can smell the winds of chang methinks).

From Vannay’s notes:

“Officially, the authorities are fighting against armed gangs. A week of here, every night of protests, the only weapons were seen between hands of soldiers and security forces. ”

Typical Baathist menhebak retorts. The tragedy is, they are completely oblivious to how idiotic they appear to the 99.999999% of the world who aren’t menhebak scum.

August 6th, 2011, 5:15 pm

 

Abughassan said:

That was very good,Sheila ,but not all of that shameful behavior was due to poverty.
Even in 2011,there are Syrians who consider alawis to be a religionless group of heretic people. I like to believe that most Syrians do not subscribe to this criminal ideology.
BTW,there are some militant alawis today who consider Sunnis as sinners who deviated from the original teachings of Muhammad (pbuh),both groups are wrong. From my personal interactions with alawi and Sunni relatives,I believe the size of militant religious Sunnis to be much bigger,and I am not here referring to peaceful conservative Sunnis but political militant islamists.
لو كان الفقر رجلا لقتلته
I am not worried about a return to those dark days. No future regime will be able to marginalize alawis or any other group, this is 2011

August 6th, 2011, 5:19 pm

 

jad said:

#0
“stop insulting our intelligence.” As if you have any MB scum.

August 6th, 2011, 5:22 pm

 

Sheila said:

# 140 Jad,
I thought we were having a conversation not a swearing match. What did you accomplish by calling Aboud names? This is insulting to all of us contributing to this blog. Please try to respect other people’s opinion. I am certainly tryig very hard to respect yours.

August 6th, 2011, 5:26 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Jad
This is ikwan house.Aboud is ikwanjiبس بلاادب.don’t wast your time with him.

August 6th, 2011, 5:37 pm

 

Abughassan said:

لو كان الفقر رجلا لقتلته
Sheila,Social class was certainly a major factor but it was not the only factor.
Even in 2011,there are militant Sunnis who consider alawis to be a heretic religionless group. There is also a group of alawis,a much smaller one than the Sunni counterpart,who think of Sunnis as a lost group that deviated from the original teachings of Muhammad (pbuh). Both are wrong ,and the militant wahabis are not just wrong,they are more dangerous too. Syrians,in my opinion,will not follow any group that aims to discriminate against other Syrians because of their religious beliefs. The regime did not help reduce the divisions inside Syria,it actually increases those divisions. The immediate result will be a stiff resistance by many Sunni Syrians against any effort to keep the domination of alawis over the army and security apparatus,however,no swift radical change can be achieved in that venue without violence,this is why I favor a gradual change in these two important segments of the government.

August 6th, 2011, 5:37 pm

 

hsyrian said:

False claim by Muslim Brothers
The “miracle” of Turkey by the Islamist Erdogan.

1) Erdogan’ AKP was governing since 2002 only.
2) Turkey was more developed than Syria largely before Erdogan.
3) Turkey deprived Syria from the water of many rivers.
4) The comparison with the Syrian economy is unfair :
Turkey largely benefited from the European Union , Otan , US subventions when
Syria was under embargo from the US and the European Union.
5) …

99) I knows Turkey from long time.

Disclaimer
Anonymous people claiming that I am a member of the Baath Party ( traitor , sha.., men.. ) when I disagree with them , cannot be called anything else than Muslim Brothers.
Anonymous people with Muslim Brothers claims are Muslim Brothers.

August 6th, 2011, 5:37 pm

 

jad said:

الجيش اللبناني يلقي القبض على شخصين هربا أسلحة لسوريا ( 30 )مرة وتصادر مركب محمل بالسلاح إلى بانياس قبل أيام

معلومات عن مصادرة مركب محمل بالسلاح إلى بانياس السورية قبل أيام و توقيف صاحبيه و تحذير من لفلفة القضية أو تمييعها و الشبكة نفذت أكثر من ثلاثين عملية تهريب أسلحة مماثلة إلى الساحل السوري
كشفت مصادر لبنانية واسعة الاطلاع معلومات عن قيام الجيش اللبناني ليل الثلاثين من الشهر الماضي بتوقيف مركب سياحي كان يخرج من مرفأ سوليدير متجها من بيروت إلى بانياس على الساحل السوري ناقلا كمية كبيرة من الأسلحة تضم رشاشات و ذخائر و مسدسات حربية ، و تضيف المصادر ان الجيش اللبناني صادر المركب و الأسلحة و اوقف الشخصين اللذين كانا على متنه و هما ( و. ت ) و ( س.ت ) من طرابلس ، و تردد حسب المصادر ان الموقوفين على صلة بأحد نواب طرابلس و بعدد من قيادات تيار المستقبل و قد اعترفا بأنهما شاركا في تهريب السلاح إلى سوريا على متن المركب لأكثر من ثلاثين شحنة سلاح تم إفراغها على الساحل السوري .
و قد أكدت المصادر ان الموقوفين و المحاضر باتوا في عهدة القضاء بينما أحيطت القضية بتكتم شديد و حذرت المصادر من قيام جهات نافذة قضائيا و امنيا محسوبة على تيار المستقبل بالتدخل للفلفة القضية و طمس الحقائق التي يمكن ان يقود إليها التوسع في التحقيق الذي قد يطال عندها نوابا و قيادات سياسية في الشمال و العاصمة سبق لها ان تورطت بدعوات معلنة للتدخل في سوريا و تقود تحركات لدعم المعارضة السورية سياسيا و إعلاميا و تردد انها تقدم مقرات و تجهيزات تقنية لغرف عمليات مستخدمة من قبل جماعات سورية متورطة في الاضطرابات ، بينما لاحت شبهات سابقة عن تورط الجهات نفسها في تهريب الأسلحة و الأموال لحساب جماعة عبد الحليم خدام و تنظيم الأخوان المسلمين في العديد من المناطق السورية و خصوصا خلال احداث بانياس و تل كلخ و دوما و درعا .
و في ضوء هذه المعلومات تدعو وكالة اخبار الشرق الجديد الحكومة و وزيري العدل و الدفاع إلى كشف الحقائق امام اللبنانيين و فضح الجهات اللبنانية المتورطة في مخطط دموي يستهدف الأمن السوري و ينعكس بالتالي على امن لبنان و هو ما يدعو إلى التوسع في التحقيق فورا و منع أي حماية أو تدخلات قضائية و امنية لحماية الموقوفين أو تحوير الاعترافات و إخفاء الأدلة كما سبق ان حصل في ملفات تحقيق اخرى معروفة .
سورية الان – الشرق الجديد

“سوليدير” نفت علاقتها بما تردد عن نقل اسلحة من “مارينا بيروت”

أعلنت شركة “سوليدير”، في بيان ان “السلطات الأمنية اللبنانية هي السلطة المولجة الحفاظ على الأمن والتفتيش والمراقبة في “مارينا بيروت”. وتنفي شركة سوليدير علمها وعلاقتها بالخبر الذي تتداوله بعض وسائل الإعلام في شأن نقل أسلحة من مارينا بيروت”.
—————————-

تهريب 30 شحنة اسلحة لسوريا
http://youtu.be/9zTaumgA7Pc

August 6th, 2011, 5:39 pm

 

Norman said:

The minorities want only to be treated equally, Is that too much to ask they do not want set aside or qoutas, they want anti discrimination laws in housing and employment,

Yes Sheila , you are right many of the maids in Syrian homes were from the Alawat community and the education that the Baath party brought to all Syrians should be valued, free education to university , reasonably priced or even free health care , yes there is corruption in Syria but they did not borrow billions like Lebanon only to enrich Harriri, if a new government comes to Syria , At least will have no foreign debt that will shackle it .
The lack of foreign debt is what is making Syria hard to push around and force it Into submission,

If we look at all of us Syrian abroad, most of us went to school in Syria only to work in the West, we did not pay back anything to Syria she deserve more from us, She at least deserve more from the Syrians who did well with the economic reform that the president started and should pay taxes to lift the rest of the Syrians, the selfishness of these people is comming back to haunt them while the president is taking the blame ,

August 6th, 2011, 5:41 pm

 

Aboud said:

Professor Landis, sometimes posts dont seem to get posted, so sorry if I seem to be posting duplicates.

@136 Oh dear God above. You link to a PDF of Vannay’s journals, and then say something absurd like “It is fairly obvious that Gaetan Vannay (Swiss journalist from Geneva ) has been sponsored by the Muslim Brothers in Syria.”

Seriously? I mean, who exactly has been taking hallucinogenic pills here? You can’t respond to a Swiss…a Swiss journalist’s first hand testimony on the atrocities he saw, so you claim he is sponsored by the “Muslim [sic] Brothers”?

You know, in Switzerland, they don’t go and buy trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim (who on Al-Arabiya this evening came waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down from his self righteous mountain. Someone can smell the winds of chang methinks).

From Vannay’s notes:

“Officially, the authorities are fighting against armed gangs. A week of here, every night of protests, the only weapons were seen between hands of soldiers and security forces. ”

Typical Baathist menhebak retorts. The tragedy is, they are completely oblivious to how idiotic they appear to the 99.999999% of the world who aren’t menhebak scum.

@140 Did I ever tell you what my favorite drink is? Menhebak tears of rage, mixed in the whine (wine hehehe) that the Baathists supply us so much with on this forum. When you and yours are around, I’m never thirsty 🙂

August 6th, 2011, 5:41 pm

 

jad said:

SNK,
I’m still waiting ‘Tara and the Angel’ story 🙂

Sorry Tara, but we have to read that part of the series.

August 6th, 2011, 5:42 pm

 

Tara said:

Dear Abughassan@138

I don’t disagree with you at all. Syria’s problems will not finish when Bashar falls. That what the Egyptian revolution is teaching us. We don’t have any infra- structure for democracy. Jobs need to be created. Divisiveness across sects line need to be addressed. Hate and revenge need to be tackled, reconciliation and forgiveness should be upheld. Radical islamists if any need to be delt with, etc etc. I’m in no disillusion at all. It is an enormous job awaiting Syrians. The issue is, none of the above problem could be tacked until the fall of the regime. Bashar waisted his opportunity. Opposition initially wanted conditional dialogue. A dialogue after curbing the security option. No one seems interested anymore even if previous conditions are met. Hama invasion was a turning point. The regime must go and I hope, as you said, regime supporters and minorities play
an active role in the exit strategy to stop their losses and to prevent marginalization in the new government.

August 6th, 2011, 5:42 pm

 

Aboud said:

Professor Landis, sometimes posts dont seem to get posted, so sorry if I seem to be posting duplicates.

@136 Oh dear God above. You link to a PDF of

Vannay’s journals, and then say something absurd like “It is fairly obvious that Gaetan Vannay (Swiss journalist from Geneva ) has been sponsored by the Muslim Brothers in Syria.”

Seriously? I mean, who exactly has been taking hallucinogenic pills here? You can’t respond to a Swiss…*a Swiss* journalist’s first hand testimony on the atrocities he saw, so you claim he is sponsored by the “Muslim [sic] Brothers”?

You know, in Switzerland, they don’t go and buy trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim (who on Al-Arabiya this evening came waaay down from his self

righteous mountain. Someone can smell the winds of chang methinks).

From Vannay’s notes:

“Officially, the authorities are fighting against armed gangs. A week of here, every night of protests, the only weapons were seen between hands of soldiers and security forces. ”

Typical Baathist menhebak retorts. The tragedy is, they are completely oblivious to how (edited for insult)

August 6th, 2011, 5:45 pm

 

Anton said:

Dear SNK

I realize that too, time ago .. people in this site still saying regime should go… Bashar should leave, regime change etc.. but no one says how? . sort of if they said so here, the regime or Bashar are listening or will listen to them and will go, in reality only what they are achieving a call for more revenge and killing which in return its bad for all Syrian, i still have a large family and friends there and i am prying for each one of them every day to keep them safe and naturally for all Syrians living there, . to be honest Mr. SNK , I am also starting to doubt about their motives too, we say, each problem is made by two, we have only the right to criticize we have no right to judge, that why i am afraid i will disagree with them unless they show up their faces and present a solution to change regime in a peaceful way .. as no one in Syria pro or against the regime believe this situation is right even the government itself, and i believe they are only doing now what they can to preserve Syria’s unity and better future for all Syrian.

please permit me to give you an example : Mr. HAYTHAM KHOURY keeps talking about regime change!! even an intellectual like him dose not say how he wants it to happen… ok! he said united the opposition??? etc.. but that is not how , he did not say how he want to change the regime …

Assuming he is an honest man and really want to change , then he should announce that he will go back to Damascus , and start an action to create a political party according to the law , with clear agenda and prepare for the next election , and try to win a majority in the Parliament( as announced today , it will be before the end of the year ) ,, then he will get chance to change regime, that is the only real change i believe on and is workable .. if that what he wants then he should say it here and let’s us know otherwise how? please .. lack of doing that i am going to question his motive as well … Mr. Abougassan too he is saying that 100 times without say HOW ?

until I see a real people with real agenda for change I will stick with this president and the government agenda for the change ,

as we say better to go with someone you know than with one you do not know ????

Thanks for allowing me to comment here

August 6th, 2011, 5:47 pm

 

Aboud said:

@140 Did I ever tell you what my favorite drink is? Menhebak tears of rage, mixed in the whine (wine hehehe) that the Baathists supply us so much with on this forum. When you and yours are around, I’m never thirsty 🙂

August 6th, 2011, 5:48 pm

 

beaware said:

State Department urges Americans to leave Syria
By MATTHEW LEE Associated Press
Posted: 08/05/2011 04:04:53 PM PDT
http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_18626019
WASHINGTON—The State Department on Friday urged Americans in Syria to leave the country immediately and advised those who remain in the country to restrict their movements, as the Syrian government intensified a violent crackdown on opposition protesters. The warning came as congressional calls grew for the Obama administration to impose severe new sanctions on President Bashar Assad’s regime.
more…..

August 6th, 2011, 5:52 pm

 

Aboud said:

Sorry for the duplicated posts professor. Sometimes they didn’t seem to be going through. Not even a “awaiting moderation” notice.

Just heard on Al-Arabiya that the Turkish Foreign Minister is on his way to Damascus to read junior the riot act. Take your guesses on what Besho’s punishment is going to be;

1) Grounded for a month

2) No more X-Box

3) No more afternoon cartoons

4) No trips to the circus this summer

5) Has to eat his greens, and no ice-cream for dessert.

6) Has to write “I am not the ruler of the world like some sycophants tell me” on the blackboard 1000 times.

August 6th, 2011, 5:54 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad@151,

You are putting too much pressure on Kandahar…I was just thinking to write a post to welcome you back…so welcome back.

August 6th, 2011, 5:59 pm

 

beaware said:

Turkey’s Davutoglu to visit Syria to ‘deliver a message’
By REUTERS
08/07/2011 00:54
http://new.jpost.com/Headlines/Article.aspx?id=232752

ISTANBUL – Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu will visit neighboring Syria on Tuesday to “deliver a message” from Turkey, Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan said.

Turkey, which until this year had close relations with Syria, has grown increasingly vocal in its criticism of Syrian President Bashar Assad’s repression of a five-month-old popular uprising.

Tensions were exacerbated in June when more than 10,000 Syrians fled across Turkey’s southern border from Syrian forces trying to stamp out the protests. Most are still sheltering in Turkish refugee camps.

August 6th, 2011, 6:08 pm

 

jad said:

Tara,
I should welcome you in, you are the new add to SC not me.

المصرف المركزي النمساوي يدرس إلغاء عقد طباعة العملة مع سورية

ذكر أحد فروع المصرف المركزي النمساوي أنه يقوم بطباعة أوراق نقدية سورية بموجب عقد موقع من دمشق في 2008، وصفته الحكومة النمساوية “بالمشبوه”، موضحا أنه يدقق حاليا في العقد لانهائه على الأرجح بحسب كالة أ ف ب.

وقال ناطق باسم مصرف إصدار الأوراق المالية والضمانات الفريد سيبيرا لوكالة الانباء النمساوية أن هذا الفرع من البنك المركزي النمساوي يدقق في العقد لالغائه على الارجح.

وأضاف “إنها بطبيعة الحال مسألة اخلاقية”.

وكان الفرع وقع في 2008 عقدا مع البنك المركزي السوري لطباعة اوراق العملة السورية.

ووصف وزير المال النمساوي اندرياس شايدر الجمعة العقد “بالمشبوه” و”غير ملائم في الاوضاع الحالية”.

http://www.aliqtisadi.com/index.php?mode=article&id=13729

August 6th, 2011, 6:19 pm

 

beaware said:

Weapons Smugglers Charged in Beirut as Solidere Says it Doesn’t Have Inspection Duty at Marina
by Naharnet Newsdesk
http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/12117-weapons-smugglers-charged-in-beirut-as-solidere-says-it-doesnt-have-inspection-duty-at-marina

The military prosecutor general has charged two Lebanese men with allegedly smuggling weapons from the Beirut Marina to Syria, a security source told As Safir daily published Saturday.

Wasim Tamim and Samir Tamim, who hail from the northern port city of Tripoli, are members of the most prominent movements in the former parliamentary majority, sources said in reference to ex-PM Saad Hariri’s al-Mustaqbal movement.

The men were arrested in Beirut last Friday, they said, adding that they have carried out more than 30 smuggling operations from Beirut to the Syrian city of Banias.

But on Friday, Lebanon’s largest company real estate developer, Solidere, issued a statement saying “the Lebanese security authorities are the only sides entitled with the preservation of security, inspection and monitoring at the Beirut Marina.”

The company, which was founded by former Premier Rafik Hariri in 1994 to rebuild downtown Beirut, denied its knowledge or link to any operation of arms smuggling from the facility.

August 6th, 2011, 6:20 pm

 

Mjabali said:

Tara and Sheila The discrimination against Alawis is in Ibn Taymiyah’s decree. Most Sunnis believe Alawis are sub humans . Look at the language and attitude of most Sunnis: they still think that Alawis are اشد كفرا من اليهود والمسيحيين كما فتًي ابن تيمية . So yes their is discrimination and injustice toward the Alawis. Until the Sunnis come up against Ibn Taymiyah there will injustice towards the Alawis

August 6th, 2011, 6:24 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

FYI. It was well meant. I said welcome “back”. Not welcome to SC. And since you are too upset by it, I take it back.

August 6th, 2011, 6:26 pm

 

Aboud said:

@160 Well, you aren’t doing a very good job of ignoring me so far, are you 🙂 “camel’s urine” LOL! All the sophistication and wit we’ve come to expect from the menhebaks (not alot)

MNA is really good. With enormous dignity, he pointed out that he isn’t a Baathist. He put me in my place. His response had class, subtlety, and calm. All the things in short supply from the Baathists on this forum.

@161 See, what did I say about the printing of the money? My left toe knows more about Syria than all the menhebaks here ever will 🙂

Besho must not be looking forward to the Turkish visit. If he had an ounce of guts he’d tell the Turks to stay in Ankara. The wimp.

August 6th, 2011, 6:30 pm

 

beaware said:

تهريب سلاح إلى سوريا: قاضٍ وضابط… ومارينا
http://www.al-akhbar.com/node/18495
أكدت مصادر أمنية أن مديرية استخبارات الجيش أحبطت عملية تهريب أسلحة من بيروت إلى سوريا. واللافت أن الموقوفين، بحسب المعلومات الأمنية، كانوا يسعون إلى نقل الأسلحة بحراً، من خلال المرفأ السياحي في منطقة السان جورج
حسن عليق

تهريب الأسلحة من لبنان إلى سوريا حكاية تتكشف فصولها يوماً بعد يوم، وآخرها توقيف مديرية استخبارات الجيش ثلاثة أشخاص جدد سعوا إلى نقل نحو ألف بندقية إلى بلاد الشام عبر البحر.
وتفيد مصادر أمنية رفيعة المستوى بأن مديرية استخبارات الجيش حصلت على معلومات مفادها أن شخصين في بيروت يبحثان عن كمية كبيرة من الأسلحة الحربية، لإرسالها إلى سوريا.

أبلغت قيادة الجيش بهذه المعلومات، فطلبت إيلاء الأمر الاهتمام اللازم، «شرط أن تكون المعلومات جدية». بدأ فرع بيروت في المديرية متابعة الأمر. وسريعاً، توصل إلى معلومات أدت إلى الاشتباه بشخصين من آل «ت»، أحدهما مسؤول عن إدارة المرفأ السياحي الذي تشغله شركة سوليدير في منطقة السان جورج. وخلال المتابعة، طلب المشتبه فيهما، مع شريك ثالث لهما يُدعى أ. أ. تأمين 1000 بندقية رشاشة، بهدف نقلها إلى سوريا. كانت المباحثات بين المشتبه فيهم الثلاثة والتاجر المفترض تجري تحت أنظار رجال الأمن الذين تمكنوا من تسجيل أكثر من محادثة جرت بين الطرفين. وعرض المشتبه فيهم مبلغ 100 ألف دولار، دفعة أولى من ثمن الأسلحة. أحضر التاجر عشر بنادق (6 من نوع كلاشنيكوف، وأربعاً من نوع أم 16) للمشتبه فيهم، لكي «يفحصوا النوعية». وخلال مباحثاته معهم، سمع التاجر من المشتبه فيهم كلاماً مفاده أنهم يريدون نقل الأسلحة بحراً، إذا كانت الكمية كبيرة. أما إذا جرى تأمينها على دفعات، فسينقلونها «بواسطة سيارة قاضٍ» إلى الشمال، ومنه إلى الداخل السوري. وأكد المشتبه فيهم للتاجر، بحسب المعلومات نفسها، أن أحد الضباط في المديرية العامة لقوى الأمن الداخلي، تولى سابقاً تسهيل عملية نقل أسلحة لحسابهم، فضلاً عن زعمهم أن ضابطاً آخر هو شريك لهم في عملهم.
وعلى ذمة المصادر الأمنية ذاتها، جرى الاتفاق بين التاجر والمشتبه فيهم على تسلم كمية من الأسلحة في منطقة بئر حسن، لكنهم خشوا الانتقال إلى تلك المنطقة، فما كان منهم إلا أن حددوا منطقة رأس بيروت لتسلم الأسلحة. وهناك، كمنت دورية من استخبارات الجيش للمشتبه فيهم والتاجر، يوم الجمعة الماضي. وبعد تسلمهم الأسلحة، لاحقتهم الدورية، إلى أن أوقفتهم في منطقة عرمون، حيث ضُبِطت كمية من الأسلحة، وكمية من الكوكايين زعم الموقوف الذي يعمل في ميناء سوليدير أنه يروّجها في مكان عمله.
باشرت استخبارات الجيش التحقيق مع الموقوفين، قبل أن يُنقلوا إلى وزارة الدفاع في اليرزة، حيث خضعوا لاستجواب دقيق لدى فرع التحقيق في المديرية. وبناءً على إفادات المشبته فيهم الثلاثة، جرى توقيف شخص رابع في الشمال، بواسطة فرع استخبارات المنطقة. وبعد انتهاء التحقيقات في المديرية، أحيل الموقوفون على المحكمة العسكرية، حيث باشر قاضي التحقيق العسكري استجوابهم.
وكانت «الأخبار» قد نشرت في عددها الصادر يوم الأربعاء الماضي خبراً عن عملية توقيف المشتبه فيهم. وطوال يوم أمس، جرى التداول بالأمر على نطاق واسع، ما دفع مسؤول الإعلام والعلاقات العامة في شركة سوليدير، نبيل راشد، إلى إصدار بيان قال فيه إن «السلطات الأمنية اللبنانية هي السلطة المكلفة بالحفاظ على الأمن والتفتيش والمراقبة في مارينا بيروت. وتنفي شركة سوليدير علمها وعلاقتها بالخبر الذي تتداوله بعض وسائل الإعلام بشأن نقل أسلحة من مارينا بيروت».
ورغم بيان سوليدير، فإن عملية التوقيف أعادت إلى التداول الأمني مسألة المرفأ السياحي في بيروت، الذي تشغله الشركة المذكورة، لكونه، بحكم الأمر الواقع، خارجاً عن السلطة الرقابية الجدية للسلطات اللبنانية، بحسب مصدر أمني معني. وعلى حد قول المصدر المذكور، فإن وجود السلطات الأمنية في المارينا هو «شكلي إلى أبعد الحدود، لكون جميع رجال الأمن المتمركزين على مدخل المارينا متراخين في تنفيذ عملهم، ولأن مستخدمي المارينا هم من أصحاب النفوذ من جهة، وبسبب تشابك الصلاحيات مع شركة سوليدير من جهة أخرى».

August 6th, 2011, 6:31 pm

 

jad said:

عزيزي بشار الأسد: عضو قيادة النظام الحاكم في سورية
الكاتب بسام القاضي
07/ 08/ 2011

تحية طيبة وبعد
أعرف أن بعض شبيحة النظام سوف يغلي الدم في رؤوسهم لأنني لم أسبق اسمك بلقب من ألقابك الكثيرة.. وبدلا من أن أسخر منهم سأقول أن أعلى شرف لشخص في هذا البلد أن يحمل لقب “مواطنة/ة”، وهذا اللقب متضمن أصلا في اسمه النكرة المجرد من أية ألقاب..

كما أن البعض سوف يستنفر طاقته ليشن حربا على “عضو قيادة النظام الحاكم في سورية”! كما لو أنني جردتك من صفتك كرئيس. لكن صفتك كرئيس تراجعت خلال الأشهر الماضية التي كشفت أن قيادة النظام الحاكم في سورية هي نوع من “مجلس”، وليست قيادة شخصية. وإن كان، بالطبع، للرئيس فيها حصة خاصة، كما هي العادة في أي شكل تنظيمي.

وبعض كثير سوف يفسر هذه الكلمات على هواه، راميا كل أنواع التهم المختلفة والمتناقضة.. في الواقع هذا أمر مسل وممتع، أعتقد أنك جربته كثيرا..

وباعتبار أنني لا أنوي الإطالة كثيرا اليوم، عكس عادتي، فإنني لن أدخل في نقاش هذين الأمرين، بل سأنتقل فورا إلى ما أريد قوله لك من خلال صوتي الخاص، راجيا أن تسمعه وإن عن بعد، بعد أن تعذر أن تسمع عن قرب إلا ما “يجب” أن تسمعه.

إذا، عزيزي بشار الأسد، لا بد أن تقويما ما معلق على جدار مكتبك. وتضع نصب أعينك أن خمسة أشهر ونيف قد بدأت منذ أشعل قريبك المجرم عاطف نجيب، وشريكه المجرم فيصل كلثوم، النار في سورية بعنجهيتهما وصلفهما الذيين ليسا إلا نموذجا واحدا من العنجهية والصلف الذين خلقتهما حالة الطوارئ التي استمرت لما يقارب الخمسين عاما، وأكلت من حياتنا الأخضر واليابس..

وقليلا قليلا، زاد عدد المجرمين من النظام كثيرا.. كثيرا جدا.. فيما بدأ عدد المجرمين من الشارع يزداد يوما تلو آخر، ويتحول إلى استعراض في الوحشية والقذارة التي يمكن أن يصلها لها هذا الحيوان الذي يمشي على اثنتين، والذي أهم توصيف له هو: الإنسان هو حيوان قاتل.

ولكن، لماذا لم نرى حتى اليوم قريبك عاطف نجيب، وثلة المجرمين من النظام والشارع، في أية محاكمة علنية؟! هل حقا ما يقولونه أن مجلس القيادة الذي أنت عضو فيه ورئيسه أيضا، لا يجرؤ على اتخاذ مثل هذا القرار خوفا من أن ينقلب المجرمون الآخرون عليه؟! هذا سؤال استفساري عزيزي، شأن كل استفساراتي هنا. وليس أيا منها سؤال اتهامي.. فرغم أننا لم نتكلم مع بعض أبدا، إلا أنه من عادتي التمكن من مخاطبة “الغرباء” كما لو كنا شربنا الشاي معا مرارا وتكرارا..

أتعرف؟ هناك أسئلة كثيرة تطرح اليوم في الشارع السوري لا ينشرها الإعلام الكاذب بفئاته. منها مثلا ما يطرحه غلاة الموالين: هل فشل النظام بأن يحمينا من “المؤامرة”؟! فهم لا يفهمون أبدا لماذا ما يزال القتل في الشارع.. ولا يفهمون أبدا لماذا تمشي عجلة المواجهة مع المسلحين بمثل عجلة “الإصلاح”: عجلة مربعة بدون حزام وقاية! وهؤلاء مسلحون اليوم بأكثر من أسلحة فردية بسيطة. وقادرون على قلب الطاولة رأسا على عقب.. وأنا واثق أنك تعرف ذلك جيدا..

ومنها مثلا ما يطرحه غلاة المعارضين: من يقود سورية فعلا؟ هل هو الرئيس بشار الأسد، أم الجنرال ماهر الأسد؟ أم لا هذا ولا ذاك، بل “ظل” ما؟! ولا أشك أنك تعرف أيضا معنى ذلك.. فهذه “أول الرقص” في سقوط الدولة.. الدول لا تسقط دائما كما تسقط تفاحة نيوتن.. فأحيانا تسقط كما يسقط السمك من السماء إثر إعصار ما..

منها أيضا: لماذا صدر قانون التظاهر على هذا النحو المريع؟ ولماذا لم يتعلم النظام الذي أنت في قيادته أن هذا خطأ فادح اليوم فكرر الأخطاء نفسها في قوانين الأحزاب والانتخابات العامة؟ وبتنا ننتظر اليوم “الخطأ” ذاته في القوانين اللاحقة مثل الإعلام والجمعيات.. وغيرها.. هذا سؤال “استثقافي” على ما يبدو.. لكنه ليس كذلك.. اسمح لي بالقول أن لدي خبرة جيدة في هذا الأمر.. فالقوانين التي تسن لا تؤخذ من “أفضل ما في الدنيا”، بل من أسوأ ما في “البساطير” العكسرية منها والأمنية والقانونية.. ربما لم تسمع سابقا بـ”البسطار القانوني”! اسأل أي معقب معاملات سيحكي لك طويلا عن هذا البسطار الخاص والمميز..

ومنها أيضا: لماذا يتم اعتقال المتظاهرين السلميين، خاصة من الطلاب والمثقفين، ويترك زعران ومخربين ليتظاهروا كما يريدون؟ رجاء اصغي لي يا عزيزي.. هذا سؤال خطير.. فهو سؤال حقيقي أولا، وسؤال ملغوم ثانيا. حقيقي لأنه يعكس الواقع كما هو. وملغوم لأنه يقول، ضمنا، أن في نظامك (أقصد النظام الذي أنت في قيادته) من يلعب لعبة قذرة ما.. فإذا كان كذلك، ماذا تتوقع من الناس أن تفكر، ثم أن تتصرف؟!

وأيضا: ألا تكفي هذه الأشهر المخضبة ليتعلم الإعلام السوري الرسمي أنه شارك، بكل قوة، بصناعة الجريمة التي نعاني منها اليوم؟ وبما أننا نعرف أن هذا الإعلام يدار من غرف سوداء عفنة ومظلمة، فالسؤال التالي: هل هناك في النظام نفسه من يريد أن يستخدم الإعلام لتفجير سورية حيث لم يتمكن السلاح من تفجيرها؟ ليس لدي تعليق إضافي على هذا المثل.. فهو ليس إلا محصلة لكل ما سبقه وما يلحقه..

وكثير غيرها.

لكن أهم سؤال تكرر على مسامعي كان: لماذا نحن موضوعين في غرفة الإسعاف؟ إذا كان لا بد أن نموت، لينتهي ذلك بسرعة! وإذا كان يمكننا أن نعيش، فلنمضي إلى ذلك بسرعة! لماذا لا يفتح لنا باب المشرحة لتبرد جثثنا! ولا غرفة العناية الفائقة لنخرج مما نحن فيه؟!

والحقيقة، عزيزي، أنه سؤال محرج جدا.. فكل من أعرفه لا يمتلك “شروى نقير” من الإجابة عليه.. وظننت أنك ربما تمتلك مثل هذه الإجابة.. أو حتى فكرة ما عن ذلك.. ولكن أيضا لن أكون متفاجئا أن لا تكون لديك إجابة.. فأنا أعرف اليوم أن عالم الماضي قد ولى.. حتى إن بقيت بعض مخلفات العقول تعيش في قماقمها.. أو قمامتها..

فحالنا اليوم هو الأصعب. هل يمكنك تخيل شخص ينزف في غرفة الإسعاف؟ وحوله ممرضين يلعبون التركس ويشربون الشاي؟ وبجانبه الضمادات ومضادات الالتهاب وهو لا يستطيع أن يمد يده؟ إنه أصعب بألف مرة من أن تقطع جثته بأيدي مجرمين وسلفيين ووهابيين.. وأصعب بألف مرة من أن يطلق النار على جبينه مجرم من الأمن كان يجب أن يكون هو حاميه!

انه حال يشبه حال الخرافات عن الروح العالقة بين السماء والأرض. لا هي تعود إلى جسدها فيبكي ويضحك، ولا هي تغادر إلى السماء فتشوى أو تمتع.. فماذا تفعل؟ إنها تطوف في المقابر، في الحانات، في الجوامع والكنائس، في كل مكان ناشرة الرعب وهي لا تقصده.. بل فقط تحاول أن تلفت الانتباه أنها عالقة.. لكن صوتها لا يسمع، فهي، ككل شبح، بلا صوت..

بل، ربما، هي تشبه تلك الجرائم التي يشيعها بعض طوال الذقون من المجرمين باسم الآلهة، حين يصورون جهنم على أن المرء فيها يشوى ويشوى، ثم يشوى ويشوى، فلا هو بميت ولا هو بحي.. بل فقط مشوي..

صرنا “مشويين” يا عزيزي بشار.. وهذا خطير جدا.. اسألني عن ذلك. فاصدقائي يعرفون أنني أحب “الشوي” كثيرا. وغالبا ما أقرر، بكل ديكتاتورية، أن هذه مهمتي في أي رحلة أو مناسبة..

نعم.. مشويين..

مشويين بنار الأصولية التي لا نرى الآن إجرامها الملموس فحسب، بل نرى أي مستقبل تحمل لنا مما يحدث في مصر وتونس أيضا..
ومشويين بنار أجهزة الأمن التي لا نرى الآن إجرامها الملموس فحسب، بل نرى أي ماض تريد أن تعيدنا إليها لتستعيد من خلاله سلطاتها..

مشويين بنار شبيحة معارضة صعقها أن أحدا يمكن أن يسألها رأيها، بعد طول انحطاط، فطاش حجرها وصدقت نفسها وجنت جنون العظمة القاتل..
ومشويين بنار شبيحة نظام تحولوا فجأة من موظفين حكوميين ومصفقي مجلس شعب.. إلى سياسيين ومحللين ومنظرين أيضا..

مشويين بنار خارجية تهدد وجودنا كله بمؤامرة وبدونها..
ومشويين بنار حماقة داخلية تهدد وجودنا كله بمؤامرة وبدونها..

هكذا أو هكذا، نحن نشوى اليوم يا عزيزي.. وهذا مؤلم.. وحياتك هو مؤلم جدا.. لكن ألم الاستمرار به على هذا النحو لأشد وأدهى..

وإذا فكرت أن تتساءل: من أنتم المشمولين بواو الجماعة في “مشويين”؟ سأقول لك ببساطة: ملايين السوريين والسوريات، ممن يريدون إسقاطك وإسقاط النظام، وممن يريدونك وإبقاء النظام، وممن لا يريدونك ويريدون النظام، وممن يريدونك ويريدون إسقاط النظام، وممن…. لكنهم جميعا مشمئزون من العنف الجاري، قرفون مما آلت إليه الحال، ومتعبون من المزيد من “العلقان”..

فما قولك؟

الوضع الآن لم يعد يحتمل..
لا تظن يا عزيزي أنني أدعوك إلى المزيد من العنف. فهذا مرفوض قطعا من قبلي.. ولا أدعوك إلى علاك المثقفين حول “الحل الأمني والحل السياسي”، فهؤلاء مجرد أمعات لا يعرفون رؤوسهم من أقدامهم…
لكنني أسألك كمواطن لم ألتق به: ألا ترى معي أنه حان الوقت لكي يفهم هذا النظام أنه هو المسؤول، أولا وأخيرا، عن كل قطرة دم تسفح في سورية؟ لا تبرر ذلك مؤامرة ولا أصولية؟ فالمؤامرة والأصولية مسؤولة عن فعلها فقط، مثل أي مجرم يكون مسؤولا عن فعله فقط. لكن ما تقوده أنت، والآخرون، هو نظام. وكـ”نظام”، لا يمكنه الهرب من مسؤوليته كل ما يجري، أيا كان، وبأي أيادي مورس…

وأرجوك، أرجوك يا عزيزي لا تكرر علي الكلام الذي مللته بعد 47 سنة أمضيتها كلها في ظل هذا النظام.. لا تحدثني عن المعادلات الإقليمية المعقدة، ولا عن المواجهة مع اسرائيل، لا عن الأطماع الخارجية، ولا عن المتربصين الداخليين، لا عن الصعوبات الاقتصادية ولا عن التغلغل الوهابي-الأصولي في الدولة، لا عن الفساد والمفسدين، ولا عن التركة الثقيلة… فكل هذا أعرفه حق المعرفة.. وحفظته عن ظهر قلب..

لكن، وكاقتراح: ما رأيك أن تحدثني عما يمكنك (والقيادة) أن تفعله اليوم، وقبل أن تغيب شمس هذا النهار؟
ولن أقترح عليك شيئا.. فمن الواضح أن الاقتراحات لا تفيد بشيء.. لكنني سأؤكد لك أن سورية ليست بخير.. حتى لو صرفت مليارات الليرات على أقمشة ملونة تصنع علما. فالعلم لم يكن يوما قطعة من قماش.. وأظنك تعرف ذلك.
سوريا ليست بخير.. بل هي تنزف بكل معنى الكلمة.. وهي ملقاة في غرفة الإسعاف، لا طبيب يضمد جراحها، ولا طبيب يطلق عليها رصاصة الرحمة.. لا إله يفتح لها درب السماء، ولا شيطان يسحبها إلى حممه..

يا عزيزي بشار،
لا أخفيك سرا أنني غير مهتم ببقائك كرئيس، أو رحيلك.. ولا ببقاء هذا النظام أو رحيله.. فأنا أصلا لم أشارك في أي استفتاء منذ ولادتي، ولا في أي انتخابات من أي نوع..
ما أنا مهتم به هو أن تخرج سورية من غرفة الإسعاف هذه، دون أن تسلم لمجرمي النظام، ولا لمجرمي الأصولية.. أن تخرج إلى سورية مدنية ديمقراطية وآمنة ومستقرة. سورية لكل مواطنيها ومواطناتها على قدم المساواة في الحقوق والواجبات، سورية لا ينفد مجرم فيها من عقاب، ولا يعاب بريء على جريمة مفبركة.. سورية لا تميز بين أتباع دين أو مذهب وأتباع دين آخر أو مذهب آخر أو من لا يتبع أي دين.. ولا بين عربي وكردي وأرمني وسرياني وآشوري و.. ولا بين امرأة ورجل، ولا بين حلبي وبوكمالي، أو بين درعاوي وجبلاوي..
ما يهمني هو أن يبدأ التغيير الجذري الحقيقي دون أن يمر بغرف الموت السريري التي يشرف عليها أساطين الحزب أو أزلام المخابرات أو زبانية الاقتصاد..

إذا، ما قولك؟ ألا تستحق سورية أن تنتهي من هذا الوضع الغريب والشاذ؟

وكما أختم كل رسائلي.. سأختم رسالتي لك بكلمة واحدة:

مودتي..

http://www.bassam-alkadi.com/content/view/628/44/

August 6th, 2011, 6:31 pm

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

MB more democratic than this “secular” Baathist murderous junta.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-08/07/c_131033580.htm
.

August 6th, 2011, 6:39 pm

 

Tara said:

We just heard Turkey seizing an Iranian plane full of weapons in it’s way to Syria, only to hear the regime seizing smuggled weapons from Lebanon to Syria.

A coincidence? May be. May be not.

August 6th, 2011, 6:40 pm

 

Akbar Palace said:

The World’s Policeman has Retired NewZ

Professor Josh Asks:

Should the US Hasten Assad’s Downfall Despite Syria’s Absence of Opposition Leaders?

Answer:

Why should the US do anything about Syria? The Syrian people will “Hasten Assad’s Downfall”.

August 6th, 2011, 6:40 pm

 

Tara said:

Mjabali

I just saw your comment. I know I can’ t possibly convince you, but I can not not answer. Mjabali, I always said I am Sunni. I come from a family that is “entrenched” in religion. Not my own parents but lots of family members, some hold “prominent” Sunni positions. I did not hear of Ibn Taymiah fatwas before SC. No member in my close or extended Sunni family believes that Alawis or Shiaa are infidel. So to say most Sunnis think of Alawi as subhuman is incorrect and not fair.

August 6th, 2011, 6:54 pm

 

ss said:

129 Abughassan
“The time also has come for the army chiefs and all minorities and supporters of Asad to formulate a peaceful exit from this mess. Enough blood shed”

I disagree. I see the ball in the field of the opposition. They have the opportunity now to organize themselves and form a leader who is willing to come and sit on the table. The goverment has opened the door for reforme. The opposition is not taking the initiative and supporting more killing and unrest in Syria to pressure the regime. The opposition has the kees for a peaceful exit.

As one of my friends jocked with me; “So far the 4th branch divisoion has been the major player on the ground” The rest of the army was not deployed at all. The president is still strong and the goverment is functioning. I see no reason for the president to exit. If everyone on the opposition started to feel that he is a replacement of president Assad then its their fault; the opposition is fragmented and too weak. The friday model of demonstration is a total failure

August 6th, 2011, 7:35 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

لكنني أسألك كمواطن لم ألتق به: ألا ترى معي أنه حان الوقت لكي يفهم هذا النظام أنه هو المسؤول، أولا وأخيرا،” عن كل قطرة دم تسفح في سورية؟ لا تبرر ذلك مؤامرة ولا أصولية؟ فالمؤامرة والأصولية مسؤولة عن فعلها فقط، مثل أي مجرم يكون مسؤولا عن فعله فقط. لكن ما تقوده أنت، والآخرون، هو نظام. وكـ”نظام”، لا يمكنه الهرب من مسؤوليته كل ما يجري، أيا كان، وبأي أيادي مورس”

August 6th, 2011, 7:41 pm

 

jad said:

مخربون يفجرون جسرا تابعا للخطوط الحديدية قرب حمص وتوقف حركة القطارات بين دمشق وحلب

أقدم مجهولون على تفجير جسر تابع للخطوط الحديدية السورية في منطقة ” حربنفسي” قرب حمص ( بين حمص وحماه) قبل منتصف ليل السبت، ما ادى إلى توقف حركة القطارات بين دمشق وحلب حتى إشعار آخر.

واستهدف التفجير الجسر الذي تمر فوقه سكة الحديد التي تصل دمشق بحلب، في وقت لم يكن يمر فوقه أي قطار، في منطقة تبعد حوالي 30 كم عن منطقة ” السودة” التي استهدفها مخربون يوم 23 شهر تموز الماضي.

وقال مدير عام مؤسسة الخطوط الحديدية السورية المهندس جورج مقعبري : ” لم نحصل على معلومات كاملة عن حجم الدمار الذي نتج عن العملية التخريبية بعد”، موضحاً أن التقديرات الأولية تشير إلى ان الخسائر ليست كبيرة جداً.

ولم يتسبب الحادث بأية إصابات بشرية، حيث اقتصرت الأضرار ( التي لم يعرف حجمها الدقيق بعد ) على الجسر الصغير والسكة.

وشدد مقعبري على أن مؤسسة الخطوط الحديدية السورية تعتبر من أكثر وسائل النقل أماناً، مؤكداً أن حراساً يحمون سكة القطار منعاً من حدوث هذا النوع من الأعمال التخريبية، مشيرا إلى ان المؤسسة قررت زيادة عدد الحراس لضمان الأمان على طول السكة.

و الغت الخطوط الحديدية جميع الرحلات بين حلب ودمشق حتى إشعار آخر، عقب العمل التخريبي.

و كانت قد أقدمت مجموعة تخريبية على فك 6 عوارض من سكة القطار في منطقة “السودة” بحمص ما أدى إلى خروج القطار عن السكة واشتعال عربة الرأس، واستشهاد سائق القطار وإصابة نحو 16 مواطناً بجروح متفاوتة في عملية تخريبية تعتبر الأولى من نوعها في سوريا خلال العقدين المنصرمين.

عكس السير

August 6th, 2011, 7:51 pm

 

Aboud said:

@172 “I see no reason for the president to exit.”

Well, that’s the basic problem. From the opposition’s point of view, he has killed close to 2,000 Syrians, made over 10,000 refugees, imprisoned over ten thousand more, and offered feeble “reforms” that not even the Gulf Council could bring itself to describe as serious.

From the menhebak’s point of view, he has utterly failed to subdue a so called “armed insurrection” after five months. He has even failed to identify clearly who is the group or organization that is supposed to be plotting and scheming to bring him down (except for Swiss Muslim Brother[sic]hood journalists, we understand that much).

He has failed to bring to justice the alleged saboteurs behind the train wreck, pipeline bomb, and the so called attack on the military academy.

He has alienated numerous former close allies, squandered Syria’s standing and power in the region, and made the country subservient to an Iranian theocracy stuck in the 6th century.

If we are being completely fair, only a fanatical menhebakite could possibly think Syria couldn’t do any better than this guy. That’s like saying that you can’t do any better than Roseanne Barr for a wife. Perish the thought.

“The friday model of demonstration is a total failure ”

A very peculiar opinion. First, the demonstrations long since stopped being just about Fridays. During the week, night time demonstrations gathered even more people than Friday prayers demonstrations. The demonstrations kept the revolution’s momentum going, and junior gifted the revolution with one bungle after another, till it reached the point that junior has become a global pariah. Him and his cannot leave Syria without fear of getting arrested.

Rather, it is more accurate to say that the military option has been a dismal failure. Even professor Landis said so, or have we forgotten his posts so soon?

August 6th, 2011, 7:54 pm

 

ss said:

So far the only solution that has been proposed by the gangs, opposition, and some on SC is that the president should exit. This is the only exit strategy that the opposition has to save Syria.

What if the president did not exit?
I see no cracks whatsoever in the goverment. Yes there is a lot of pressure but I do not see a fall any time soon

Do you guys have an alternative solution instead of repeating the same words “he should exit” which by itself asks for more blood to be shed on the streets. Why stopping the blood shed should be by him exiting rather than you ideots coming to the table to negotiate. “He should exit”: does not look like it is going to happen

Hama as I heard is under control. I have not seen or heard of any demonstrations there.
The next city will be Dier Alzoor. God bless the army in saving the country from criminals and armed thugs

August 6th, 2011, 8:01 pm

 

newfolder said:

كلمة المسيحي السوري الحر سمير مطر من مدينة حمص الى الشعب السوري

a free Christian from Homs, Samir Mattar speaks out. God bless him:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlDf-VaIPGQ

اغنية القاشوش في الكويت
also, Kuwaitis sing Kashouh’s song “ir7al ya Bashar”

August 6th, 2011, 8:04 pm

 

newfolder said:

#175 in my opinion the only thing that can save Syria now from a civil war or a foreign intervention is a power sharing government of national unity, made up of prominent opposition figures as well as regime appointed ones to oversee a democratic transition. The Mukhabarat forces must have their wings clipped to stay out of political and social life in Syria. This is the only credible way to implement real reforms and de-escalate the situation.

August 6th, 2011, 8:09 pm

 

MM said:

As-Safir Newspaper –
السادة الأساقفة،
على مذابحنا بقعٌ من دم

نيراس شحيد

نادت الكنيسة دائماً بحق كل إنسانٍ في الحرية والكرامة، وحثت العلمانيــين على النضــال المســتنير من أجل هذا الهدف النبيل، وطلبت من رجال الدين دعم هذا الواجب، ولكن من دون الانخراط المباشر في العمل السياسي الميداني، مما يؤهلهم لأن يكونوا مرجعاً للجميع. أين نحن من هذا النداء في سوريا؟ مِن كهنتنا من هو بعثي، ومِن أساقفتنا من لا يتردد في تخوين كل المتظاهرين، ومِن بطاركتنا من لا يكف عن كـيل المدائح للنظام، في الوقت الذي لا يجرؤ فيه كاهنٌ على غسل جراح ماضينا، أو أسقفٌ على الوقوف في وجه أجهــزة الأمن ليكرر وصية من لا يموت: «كفاكم قتلاً!». وبدلاً من أن يكون يوم الثالث والعشرين من حزيران المنصرم يوم صومٍ وصلاة، كما ورد في بيان أساقفة دمشق، تحول تجمع المؤمنين في كنيسة الصليب الدمشقية إلى مهرجانٍ خطابيٍ سياسي، وازدادت الدمعة بريقاً.
لا يُسأل شعبنا بل يتكلم بعض أساقفته عوضاً عنه ليقولوا للجميع: «هو لونٌ واحدٌ هذا الذي لا ينـفك يردد «نعم نعم…»». أما الحرية فليست إلا «مؤامرةً» و«عصابات»، وكأن أناساً لم يوجدوا يوماً ليخرجوا من دون أن يعودوا، وتصدح أصوات من يحملون أشلاءهم «سلمية سلمية» فيكرر الواعظ «مندسون مندسون». ويدخل الجيش المدن وتتعالى هتافات الشارع وتغرق الكنيسة في صمتها، «نعم نعم…»، وتبرق الدمعة من جديد. أما مستقبل الحراك فلـيس إلا «إماراتٍ سلفــية»، وكأن لا مسيحيين ولا علمانيين يخرجون كل جمـعةٍ من المساجد، وكأن لا مناضلين مدنيين يُخطفون من ديارهم، وكأننا لم نكن جيراناً، وكأن لا ماضيَ مشتركاً لنا، وكأن لا خـبز ولا ملـح ولا قهوة بيننا. من أفواه بعض خطبائنا يطلق رصاص الكلـمات، ومن حناجرهم تصـدح عبارات المديح والولاء لتُخــرس ما لا يمكن إخراسه: حنجرة ابراهيم قاشوش. من جــسد المسيح على الهياكل ينزف حمزة وهاجر، ومن جنب ذلك الـناصري تمتزج حماة بدير الزور، ويردد الواعظ من جديد «مندسون مندسون».
وبدلاً من أن تقوم الكنيسة الرسمية بالتأكيد على القيم الإنسانية، وبدلاً من أن تترك لمؤمنيها حرية خــياراتهم السياسية بحسب صوت ضمائرهم، وبدلاً من أن توصي المسؤولين بوقف القمع، والمتظاهرين بضبط النفس كي لا تنجرف البلاد إلى مزيدٍ من المآسي، وبدلاً من أن تطرح تأجج الشارع السوري في إطاره التاريخي حيث استفــحل الفــساد وصودرت الحريات لعقودٍ مديدة، يتبنى بعض رجال الكنــيسة في سوريا موقفاً سياسياً واضحاً مؤيداً للنــظام الــقائم، وتُعزف الموسيقى ويُزج بشبابنا في احتفالات ساحة الأمويين بدلاً من الحداد على أرواح من سقطوا، ويزداد الجرح عمقاً، فيتردد صوت المسيح قادماً من بعيد: «أعطوا لله ما لله ولقيصر ما لقيصر»، ولكن الواعظ يردد من جديد «مندسون مندسون». وكأن شيئاً لم يكن، وكأن لا ذكريات نازفةً لشعبنا، وكأن كل المتظاهرين مجرمون يباعون ويشترون، وكأن الخوف قد صلب الرجاء…
اعذروا، سادتي وأساقفتي، أشجان راهبٍ صغيرٍ مثلي لا يفقه في الحياة إلا القليل، واعذروا أصوات من رفض من أبنائكم انحياز العديد من رجال الدين، فللبلاد العربية ربيعٌ يهلّ يوماً وللكنيسة سيكون نوّارها…

August 6th, 2011, 8:11 pm

 

Aboud said:

@172 “I see no reason for the president to exit.”

Well, that’s the basic problem. From the opposition’s point of view, he has killed close to 2,000 Syrians, made over 10,000 refugees, imprisoned over ten thousand more, and offered feeble “reforms” that not even the Gulf Council could bring itself to describe as serious.

From the menhebak’s point of view, he has utterly failed to subdue a so called “armed insurrection” after five months. He has even failed to identify clearly who is the group or organization that is supposed to be plotting and scheming to bring him down (except for Swiss Muslim Brother[sic]hood journalists, we understand that much).

He has failed to bring to justice the alleged saboteurs behind the train wreck, pipeline bomb, and the so called attack on the military academy.

He has alienated numerous former close allies, squandered Syria’s standing and power in the region, and made the country subservient to an Iranian theocracy stuck in the 6th century.

If we are being completely fair, only a fanatical menhebakite could possibly think Syria couldn’t do any better than this guy. That’s like saying that you can’t do any better than Roseanne Barr for a wife. Perish the thought.

“The friday model of demonstration is a total failure ”

A very peculiar opinion. First, the demonstrations long since stopped being just about Fridays. During the week, night time demonstrations gathered even more people than Friday prayers demonstrations. The demonstrations kept the revolution’s momentum going, and junior gifted the revolution with one bungle after another, till it reached the point that junior has become a global pariah. Him and his cannot leave Syria without fear of getting arrested.

Rather, it is more accurate to say that the military option has been a dismal failure. Even professor Landis said so, or have we forgotten his posts so soon?

@175 “Hama as I heard is under control. I have not seen or heard of any demonstrations there.”

Excuse me? And you wonder why I consider all menhebaks scum? There are no demonstrations because your pathetic akho sharmouta president sent in hundreds of tanks to slaughter hundreds of people. Is this what Baathist scum call a “victory”? Utterly disgraceful.

August 6th, 2011, 8:12 pm

 

jna said:

Airstrike Reportedly Kills Civilians in Southern Afghanistan

By RAY RIVERA and TAIMOOR SHAH
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/07/world/asia/07helmand.html

Published: August 6, 2011

KABUL, Afghanistan — A woman and seven young children were killed in southern Afghanistan when a coalition patrol called in an airstrike against insurgents firing on them from a mud compound, Afghan officials said Saturday. NATO said it was investigating the attack.

August 6th, 2011, 8:16 pm

 

Norman said:

The Syrian army is moving into Deer al Zour, God Bless them and help them restore security and get rid of the terrorists.

August 6th, 2011, 8:39 pm

 

Aboud said:

There seems to be a problem with the website, some comments aren’t getting posted. I had a reply to the disgraceful post at @175. I’m appalled that a so called Syrian would consider sending in hundreds of tanks and the killing of hundreds of civilians as a victory. Utterly contemptible.

August 6th, 2011, 8:40 pm

 

ss said:

179 Aboud “I had a reply to the disgraceful post at @175. I’m appalled that a so called Syrian would consider sending in hundreds of tanks and the killing of hundreds of civilians as a victory. Utterly contemptible”.

I did not mean to make you angry but just reporting the facts. Hama under control and we are not seeing any clips or videos coming from there. I know you are out of business when it comes to Hama. Deer al Zour will have the same fate. The army should control the centers and it seems that this is president Assad plan since the start of Ramadan. Many predicted that the 10th of August is going to be his fall.

Hopefully the next would be Homs again and again until the three cities are under complete control by the army. Aboud you are loosing this round. Ramadan will not be your Jihadist month

August 6th, 2011, 8:48 pm

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: THE PALAZZO OF SIGNOR AKBAR

RE: “…Why should the US do anything about Syria? The Syrian people will hasten Assad’s downfall…”

Exactly. Count on the Syrian People to totally, immutably muck up the process beyond any hope of repair. And, believe me, they don’t need any help from anyone.

August 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm

 

ss said:

Iran and HA knows very well that they will be the next target on the western agenda in case the west decided to attack Syria. Neither HA nor Iran would allow themselves to be the next feast. The minute the NATO decided a strike on Syria, HA and Iran will be on the move. Attacks will happen on several lines in Afghanistan, (Kurds in Turkey), western interets in Iraq, and Israel(by HA). Syrian army is not strong as Israeli one but I think the Syrians should have some effective rockets that may let the west shy off any possible strike. President Assad has all the time to bring order to the streets. It is the opposition who should take advantage of this situation and strat forming a leadership and gain political success. The chaos will not lead to any gains

August 6th, 2011, 8:58 pm

 

ss said:

181#Dale Andersen;

Radical Islamists in Iraq tried to bring chaos to the country and tried to throw the regime elected by the US; I guess they failed. The structure of the regime is different than that of Tunis, Egypt, or even Iran (shah). Ther Syrians in the streets are mostly non peaceful, armed thugs, radical moslems, with long beards, and scary features (we all have seen the videos) and these should not have any role in the political future of Syria

August 6th, 2011, 9:02 pm

 

newfolder said:

#180 the only way for Bashar to hang on to power in to keep his tanks inside the cities indefinitely, cause as soon as they pull out, the protesters will be back. Either that, or he will have to slaughter half the population. Wake up and smell the coffee, it’s over, Bashar’s days are numbered. The whole world is against Bashar, the Gulf states are beginning to change their position, so is Russia.

August 6th, 2011, 9:03 pm

 

ss said:

Comment 184: “The whole world is against Bashar, the Gulf states are beginning to change their position, so is Russia”

We know that and we know that the UN may charge him of “war crimes” etc….That will change nothing in the fact that the NATO knows well the strike would be very costly, esp strinking this regime would be really really costly. Without a NATO strike Assad is your president and honorly mine likes it or not

August 6th, 2011, 9:08 pm

 

Aboud said:

@180 The only way what the regime is doing can be considered a “victory”, is by someone eager to see the country fall into civil war. Everything you said is the gloating of a person who cares nothing for Syria, but is eager to see it tear itself apart.

And Dale Andersen continues to make it painfully obvious that he has issues with all Syrians, no matter where they may be. It’s sad to watch 🙂

August 6th, 2011, 9:16 pm

 

JNA said:

Israel mum on Syria, US Jewish groups speak out
By GIL SHEFLER, JPOST CORRESPONDENT
08/05/2011 06:19

American Jewish Committee says resolution not enough, more measures targeting Syrian government, country’s energy sector should be passed.

NEW YORK – Condemnation of Syria in the wake of the crackdown on anti-government movement in Hama that started last weekend has been vocal and near universal.

Israel has been one of the few exceptions.

RELATED:
US sanctions Syrian MP with ties to Assad
Clinton: Syrian regime responsible for over 2,000 deaths

Jerusalem has remained mute on the subject, perhaps because it has been preoccupied by protests at home over the cost of housing. More likely, however, because it does not want to be seen as supporting the movement that Syrian President Bashar Assad has accused of being orchestrated by Israel, in a bid to delegitimize it.

Jewish-American organizations, however, have no such qualms and have been more outspoken in their condemnation of Israel’s northeastern neighbor.

The Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League on Wednesday all issued statements criticizing Damascus.

“The people in Syria have been looking to the West and saying ‘your silence is killing us,’” said Malcolm Hoenlein, the executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents.

Hoenlein said the protracted talks at the United Nation’s Security Council over how to respond to violence in Syria, compared with the relative ease with which condemnations of Israel are passed through the General Assembly, exposed the hypocrisy of some UN members.

“They attack Israel, but when it came to Syria, where the violations are so blatant, they did not and it highlighted the double standard or quadruple standard found in the United Nations,” he said.

The message that human rights violations were unacceptable should be extended to Iran, which “provides weapons and manpower to suppress the popular expressions [in Syria],” Hoenlein said.

The American Jewish Committee said the resolution was not enough and that more measures including targeting of individuals in the Syrian government and the country’s energy sector should be passed.

“As the UN Security Council met over the past three days, the Assad regime has significantly increased its violent repression of the Syrian people,” AJC Executive Director David Harris said. “The extent of the carnage wrought by Assad in Hama, Homs, Daraa and other cities over the past four months demands stronger international condemnation and action.”

Russia, China and others were “complicit in obstructing global efforts to support the courageous Syrian protesters and to convince Assad to stop the ruthless campaign of violence against his own people. The Syrian people deserve more empathy and firmer action by the UN. Regrettably, several of the Security Council members have chosen to ignore their anguish,” the AJC said.

The Anti-Defamation League also said the resolution approved by the Security Council was insufficient and urged the council pass sanctions against the government in Damascus.

“While it is appropriate for the Security Council to be dealing with the ongoing crisis in Syria, the council’s presidential statement condemning the Assad regime’s human rights violations and ruthless use of force against Syrian civilians is a wholly inadequate response,” ADL National Director Abraham Foxman said. “In light of the regime’s brutality in recent months, particularly its current actions in the town of Hama, we urge the council to adopt a resolution that will make it unambiguously clear to President Assad that unless he reverses course, the international community will impose immediate consequences on his repressive regime.”

http://www.jpost.com/JewishWorld/JewishNews/Article.aspx?id=232585

August 6th, 2011, 9:24 pm

 

ss said:

186#Aboud;

Who told that Syria is in civil war. Syria is in a war against terrorism. The videos posted clearly shows the type of people conducting what is called “revolution”. What we see is uneducated, horrible armed men, who smell religious head to toe, shouting Alah wa Akbar, wanting to kill minorities in the name of God. This become clear even the honest opposition realized this factor. This is fact not fiction. The army is attacking these thugs. Aboud you are on the run and the army is controlling the streets this month. Ramadan did not turn to be your Jihadist month after all

August 6th, 2011, 9:28 pm

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: SS

RE: “…The Syrians in the streets are mostly non peaceful, armed thugs, radical moslems with long beards…and these should not have any role in the political future of Syria…”

Why shouldn’t they? These are the people doing the lion’s share of the protesting and fighting back against Besho’s thugs. When the revolution is over and the Assad Mafia is gone, they should be allotted a share in the representation in the new government. I mean, fair’s fair…

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Dale_Andersen/post_2253_b_913417_100069345.html

August 6th, 2011, 9:40 pm

 

syau said:

#179,

“I had a reply to the disgraceful post at @175. I’m appalled that a so called Syrian would consider sending in hundreds of tanks and the killing of hundreds of civilians as a victory. Utterly contemptible.”

Actually, SS didn’t say anything of the sort; his comment was “The next city will be Dier Alzoor. God bless the army in saving the country from criminals and armed thugs”

In plain English, he is wishing the army well in its efforts in clearing the country of the terror these criminals have unleashed.

As for you and others, you defend the horrific killings and mutilations of security personnel and civilians opposed to this terrorist revolution as claim it to be self defence. Does mutilating your victim fall under the category of self defence?

I wish the army a swift victory in Deir Alzour in eradicating every single terrorist and criminal affiliated with this ‘revolution’ murdering and mutilating, destroying infrastructure and terrorising residents in Deir Alzour where they murder and mutilate in the streets while whistling and chanting, and every other province where they are unleashing their terror.

Supporting the revolution in Syria is supporting terror.

August 6th, 2011, 9:47 pm

 

Tara said:

CNN: ireport

Hama, Syria: 40 Premature babies DEAD in hospital chambers as electricity is shut off by the government

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-647480?ref=feeds/latest

August 6th, 2011, 10:08 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Can SSSSSSssss’s explain how this outlawed junior is different from his counterpart in Haifa, and second how different was the war on Gaza and its inhabitants different from the war waged by the despicable on our brethren in Syrian cities?

The excitement you are conveying in your comments with every Syrian death is puzzling, to say the least.

August 6th, 2011, 10:14 pm

 

Norman said:

Tara,

These lies remind me with the lies that were said when Iraq invaded Kuwait and they got the daughter of the Kuwaiti ambassador to lie in front of Congress to get support for the invasion of Kuwait, they are doing the same thing, repeating what worked before.

August 6th, 2011, 10:18 pm

 

syau said:

Tara,

I was waiting to see when someone would bring that up, and now that you have, I can tell you that it’s a fabrication.

The image is not from Hama, it is from Alexandria, Egypt. This is just another fabrication one of the fabrication attempts in the vicious propaganda war aimed at demonising the Syrian government.

Here is one of the links to that prove it is from Egypt.

http://forums.fatakat.com/thread1408443

If it’s even possible for this so called revolution to stoop any lower, this is it.

August 6th, 2011, 10:24 pm

 

jad said:

Tara:
Tell CNN that the picture is from Alexndria, Egypt
http://forums.fatakat.com/thread1408443

August 6th, 2011, 10:25 pm

 

syau said:

Tara,

I was waiting to see when someone would bring that up, and now that you have, I can tell you that it’s a fabrication.

The image is not from Hama, it is from Alexandria, Egypt. This is just another fabrication one of the fabrication attempts in the vicious propaganda war aimed at demonising the Syrian government.

Here you go, this is one of the links to that prove it is from Egypt.

http://forums.fatakat.com/thread1408443

August 6th, 2011, 10:25 pm

 

Aboud said:

@197 And what the hell do you think happens to a hospital when the electricity is cut off? Oh my God I cannot believe I’d ever see the day when so called Syrians would gloat and cheer the murder of their countrymen.

You aren’t Syrians, you are Assadstanians. If a thousand shabiha scum get cut up, I’d consider that nothing more than a good start.

August 6th, 2011, 10:26 pm

 

Tara said:

Norman

I do not know the authenticity of the CNN ireport but I know water and electricity is cut off from Hams. Mr. Assad has a long standing history of killing and torturing children. I doubt very much that the regime cuts off electicity selectively. Humanity is not included in their psych. You being a doctor are fully aware that if electicity is cut off in the hospitals people die. I hope the report is not authentic. It is beyond savagery…The truth will soon come out.

August 6th, 2011, 10:29 pm

 

syau said:

Jad,

Thanks for the link, I have been trying to link it, but there seems to be a problem with posting comments, I tried three times and my post didnt appear.

Aboud should have read the link before his pathetic rant.

This is just another fabrication attempt in the vicious propaganda war against Syria.

August 6th, 2011, 10:29 pm

 

Real Syrian said:

To S.S
my dear, discussion with radicals like whom is called Aboud is a waste of time, Islamic radicals acquire their dirty thoughts of killing and Jihad against Kuffar (Christian, Jewish, druze, Alawaites ,and all other people all over the world) when they start breast feeding.
There is a real problem in such Islamic mentality. You should be Muslim or you should pay (for the Islamic Mafia),or you are going to be killed??????
Anyway I do not think that the middle east is coming to a war scenario ….I believe that the West is using these radical buggers in Syria to improve their conditions when they negotiate Iran and Al-Assad …….Your Jewish neighbors know the truth about the Islamic radicals….They use these garbage but they do not trust them…..

August 6th, 2011, 10:36 pm

 

Real Syrian said:

S.S
My dear, discussion with radicals like whom is called Aboud is a waste of time, Islamic radicals acquire their dirty thoughts of killing and Jihad against Kuffar (Christian, Jewish, druze, Alawaites ,and all other people all over the world) when they start breast feeding.
There is a real problem in such Islamic mentality. You should be Muslim or you should pay (for the Islamic Mafia),or you are going to be killed??????
Anyway I do not think that the middle east is coming to a war scenario ….I believe that the West is using these radical buggers in Syria to improve their conditions when they negotiate Iran and Al-Assad …….Your Jewish neighbors know the truth about the Islamic radicals….They use these garbage but they do not trust them…..

August 6th, 2011, 10:42 pm

 

Norman said:

Tara,Aboud

If you know anything about Syria you would know that in Syria , not just hospitals but even houses have generators for electricity,because of the frequent cut in electricity, so please you and Aboud , think first then rant,

Thanks Jad for the link, That was a knockout punch ,

August 6th, 2011, 10:43 pm

 

SQI said:

استراحة المحارب

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjDwluCcBpk

الله ينصرهم

look well at these faces of those who will defeat not just “Complicate US Planning” or rather SOCOM war on Syria.
(http://www.tomdispatch.com/blog/175426/)

August 6th, 2011, 10:46 pm

 

ss said:

Tara,

It seems that all you evidence and sources are a bunch of crap lies. See comment 198. These kids are Egyptians not Syrians. Ops another fabrication. This is your bread and butter; spread fabricatted videos and false accusation.

August 6th, 2011, 10:48 pm

 

ss said:

199 by Aboud”@197 And what the hell do you think happens to a hospital when the electricity is cut off?”

Calm down. I understand it is very difficult situation. I understand that you were not expecting the month to turn the way it did. You hoped that you Jihadist ALAH WA AKBAR thugs would be killing, and excuting Jihad. That is not the case. The army is after you. You will be defeated. Can you tell me how many people demonstrated the fall of Assad last Friday in Hama? I tell you: NONEEEEEE.

I will ask you the same question for next friday when the army controls deer al zoor. I hope you will have no videos to show

August 6th, 2011, 10:55 pm

 

Sheila said:

Dear #149. Norman,
I agree that minorities should be treated equally. It is a right that every citizen should possess and not have to ask for, however, and from living in the west, we all know that discrimination at some level exists everywhere, even in the most developed of countries. What do you expect from a third world country like Syria?

It is true that we got free education and health care in Syria, of poor quality, but then again what do you expect from a third world country. However, the important point is that those of us who live in the west and are very successful, would have done nothing of valur in Syria, unless they were “connected”. I forgot who said that Syria is the graveyard of talent. It is so true.

The president is taking the blame for his actions, or lack there of. Even the most ardent regime supporters admit that Syria is a mess. I do not know where to start. All I can say is that, had we had a president who truly loved his country and wanted to make something out of it, Syria would have been a much different place. Judging from Syrians outside the country, we do have tremendous potential. What a shame and what a waste.

August 6th, 2011, 10:59 pm

 

Tara said:

Norman

“If you know anything about Syria you would know that in Syria..” please stop infantile statements. It does not fit with your personality.

The photo is obviously fake. I truly hope the report is fake too.

SS,

I asked you before but it seems You do not give up. Do you?
No intrest!! Any hope you engage someone else in a conversation. Just not my style.

August 6th, 2011, 11:01 pm

 

Real Syrian said:

S.S
My dear, discussion with radicals like whom is called Aboud is a waste of time, Islamic radicals acquire their dirty thoughts of killing and Jihad against Kuffar (Christian, Jewish, druze, Alawaites ,and all other people all over the world) when they start breast feeding.
There is a real problem in such Islamic mentality. You should be Muslim or you should pay (for the Islamic Mafia),or you are going to be killed?
Anyway I do not think that the middle east is coming to a war scenario ….I believe that the West is using these radical buggers in Syria to improve their conditions when they negotiate Iran and Al-Assad …….Your Jewish neighbors know the truth about the Islamic radicals….They use these garbage but they do not trust them.

August 6th, 2011, 11:06 pm

 

ss said:

210: Tara,

“The photo is obviously fake. I truly hope the report is fake too”.

Not unusual for the MBs to post fake videos/pics and blame the regime of that. It beomes a predictable routine.

Here we go another opposition fellow admits the report to be fake.

This revolution is based on fake people and fake reports. The army after deer al zoor. God bless them

August 6th, 2011, 11:13 pm

 

Tara said:

Syau

I stand corrected. The picture is fake. Kindly though explain to me your statement

” I was waiting to see when someone would bring that up, and now that you have, I can tell you that it’s a fabrication.”

How could you and Jad provide a proof of its fakeness in the speed of light? Jad’ post and your post came in no time with a proof. Am I missing something? Please explain.

August 6th, 2011, 11:16 pm

 

Sheila said:

Dear #163. Mjabali,

I would like to assure you that as a sunni muslim, I only believe in god and the Qoran. All those religious scholars only represent themselves and their opinion. We, as muslims, are supposed to use our brains to judge these scholars writings and opinions.
I hereby declare that, in my opinion, Ibn Taymiyah was wrong in Judging Alawiis in such a manner. I also want to point out that we believe in Christianity and Judaism, so for the Alawiis to be called more “kuffar” than Christians and Jews does not make any sense.
I have never thought of Alawiis in that way, nor have I heard anyone I know, regard Alawiis in this manner.

I hope this answers your question.

August 6th, 2011, 11:18 pm

 

ss said:

212# “How could you and Jad provide a proof of its fakeness in the speed of light?”

That is the difference between intellegent people and dumb people.
We thank the intellegent people for revealing the lies and fabrication of the dumb revolution people who takes any chance to make things 100000 times worse. Lies, Lies

August 6th, 2011, 11:18 pm

 

Sheila said:

To #167. jad,

Thanks Jad. Fantastic article.

August 6th, 2011, 11:33 pm

 

syau said:

Tara,

That image and ‘story’ has been reported prior to the CNN report you linked. I was surprised no one was on it until now, others probably new it was a fabrication and didn’t bring it up.

August 6th, 2011, 11:38 pm

 

Revlon said:

177. Dear newfolder, thank you very much for linking Mr. Samir Matar’s video message on the Syrian revolution, as A Chrisitian Syrian.

His message, on the Muslem-Christian co-existance prior to, and during Assad regin, is a different version from what minorities on have been offering on this blog.

I was particularly impressed by his call to his fellow Christians to make Sunday masses like Friday prayers, occasionas and points for demonstrations.

His voice and message to Church leaders in Syria could fairly reflect the pulse of the young Chrisitan street. It should serve to offset the earlier negatively received messages offered by the Regime sponsored Church clergy.

August 6th, 2011, 11:40 pm

 

Sheila said:

To #180. Aboud,
As much as I agree with you and feel the same frustration, I urge you to watch your language. We do not want to start a swearing match. It just does not achieve anything. Please, please, please at the risk of sounding like your mother, let us respect each other’s opinion (as hard as it is sometimes to do so).
With lots of love,
Sheila

August 6th, 2011, 11:49 pm

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Ban Qi Moon was finally able to talk to Assad, he warned him of the consequences of his brutal behaviour, and yes Erdogan said he can not stand quiet while the regime in Syria is behaving like this, he is sending his foreign minister ,tuesday, to Damascus to issue final warning,
What do we see the answer by Bashar? today it was announced that bashar is sending troops,tanks to Dair ezzor ,even that the people were meeting and supporting the protesters, his attitude and mentality is telling.

I did not find Abughassan comments as impartial, I think it is contrdictory.some one with his education and stature should not be saying that this revolution as MB,it is about freedom and dignity, it is about the future where there is no place for radical Islamist to replace Assadist dictatorship, they will not be allowed,please stop this complex,the educated and those who were exposed to the rule of law,and exposed to the true civilization, will lead this revolution .MB was never a threat to syrian,was never in real power in the pre Baath era,or pre Assad era, and they will never have future in syrian politics, however over 90% of syrian are mosslems, so Islam is part of Syria, but no place for a radical group, we need to get rid of this complex.
Do you believe in freedom ? do you support freedom and dignity?, this is where your position should be,the fact that you have connections with Assad regime,should not be a reason to take contradictory position,if you really respect freedom and dignity.

Sheila: can you tell us more about you,like your education and how long have you been in this country.
Iman Baghdadi represent the syrian revolution,and so is Razan zaitouna,and yes Suhair Atassi,those who accuse them of being MB are talking nonsense.
Those who support Assad ,they are doing that because they are afraid of loosing their power or connection, they wasted their educations,and they wasted the good values that we are suppose to learn living in free society,when some one sees wrong he should not hesitate to say it is wrong,human rights and dignity is universal,I am surprised that money and connections to power is blinding their mind,what a waste.

August 7th, 2011, 12:07 am

 

Sheila said:

To #205. Norman,

Sorry to burst your bubble Norman, but if you know anything about Syria you would know that these generators in hospitals work on “Mazot”. It is an established fact that there is a shortage of that in Syria. The hospitals lost power and their generators are out. Even if they had their tanks full, they should be all used up by now.
So, as a Norman I know once said: Please think first before you rant.

August 7th, 2011, 12:07 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Ban Qi Moon finally just was able to talk to Bashar and send him warning, and Erdogan is sending hi foreign minister to Syria Tuesday, to give them final warning, Bashar response is clear he sent troops and tank to destry Dair Ezzor.

AbuGhassan comments are not impartial, it is contradictory,some one with his great education and stature, some one who lives in USA exposed to the freedom and rule of Law ,I found him unexpectedly, keeping his connection with the regime ,to influence his comments,do you believe in freedom,human rights, and human dignity? this should dictate your ideas and comments.
those who support the regime either they have connections with those in power,or stands to loose financially,they wasted their education, their minds are not open, they live in a past, what a waste.

August 7th, 2011, 12:23 am

 

beaware said:

The “mine field” of Syria unrest
Aug 4, 2011 14:10 Moscow Time
http://english.ruvr.ru/2011/08/04/54182836.html
Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad has issued a decree authorizing a multi-party system. By doing so, he has satisfied the opposition’s demands for political reforms. However, despite the decree, the situation in Syria remains tense. Mass rallies of protest rolled across the country as government troops captured the city center in Hama on Wednesday. After three days of heated discussions, the UN Security Council failed to produce a resolution on Syria. Instead, it adopted a statement condemning the Syrian government’s crackdown on protesters.

The bill on a multi-party system, approved by the government on July 24th, marks the first step towards ending decades of monopoly on power by the Baath party, which came to power in 1963.

The UN Security Council statement, which experts see as balanced, may facilitate a peaceful solution to the crisis. A different reaction would be disastrous under the circumstances, says Sergei Demidenko, an Oriental expert from the Strategic Evaluation and Analysis Institute:

“Should the UN choose to impose severe sanctions on Syria, they will rock it. Syria’s multi-ethnic and multi-confessional balance is too fragile to withstand sanctions. If the current government leaves now, the country will plunge into chaos. The opposition has no clear-cut program for getting the country out of the mess. As a result, the entire region may fall into turmoil.”

The United States and a number of European countries insisted on drastic measures against Syria. The day before the Council’s session, Italy recalled its ambassador from Damascus. Russia, along with other countries being opposed to rough action, helped to secure a less painful approach. As a result, the Security Council urged the Syrian authorities to put an end to the bloodshed and called on the opposition leaders to demonstrate restraint and abstain from assaulting government buildings.

The latest developments give reason to believe that the current confrontation will soon give way to reforms, Sergei Demidenko says:

“In the foreseeable future, President Assad has every potential to keep the situation in the country under control. The opposition is split economically and politically, and the current attempts to quell the Islamic opposition and carry out reforms mark a turning point of sorts. The country has hit the path to reforms and will come out of the crisis in better shape.”

Experts say that President Bashar al-Assad is prepared to carry out reforms but this process will be long and difficult, given resistance from the old generation politicians, the EU sanctions and the US statements about isolating Syria. In this respect, Russia’s proposal to start dialogue for an effective and early solution to Syria’s political, social and economic problems becomes more than relevant.

August 7th, 2011, 12:38 am

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: SYAU

RE: “…supporting the revolution is supporting terror…”

No, it’s not.

August 7th, 2011, 12:43 am

 

Abughassan said:

I am sorry you are having a bad day,khaldoun, I hope that attacking a person you do not know make you feel better. People like me are the regime’s worst nightmare , this is why copies of abughassan filled Asad’s prisons. I have no problem talking to good officers in the army ,none of my contacts is a thief or an evil person, they are syrians to the bone.
I will not spend another line on this subject while syrians are dying..

August 7th, 2011, 12:47 am

 

Tara said:

Reading Russian articles is a complete waste of time. It is like reading some mnhebak statements.
” by doing so, he has satisfied the opposition’s demands for political reform”. Said who, somebody sitting in Moscow and vacationing in Syberia?

The new sanctions should completely block oil and gas export from Syria. We’ll see then how shabiha salary get paid.

August 7th, 2011, 12:53 am

 

Abughassan said:

One website claims that people in that famous video throwing bodies in the river have been arrested along with the driver.
Do not shoot the messenger, I am just passing the news..You guys are really edgy today ..

August 7th, 2011, 1:04 am

 

Aus4Syria said:

Dear JL,

Whilst I do not comment as often as others on this site, over the last few days I have posted several times urging all sides to accept that the rational solution to this crises is precisely the type of negotiated solution Patrick Seale is calling for. The type of negotiation that was labelled fruitless in your article- a characterisation you agreed with.

Whilst the talks have not made much difference on the street, what you have failed to point out is that the opposition has consistently dismissed every concession, announcement and negotiated position summarily. Negotiation cannot succeed unless there are two willing parties.

Herein lies the problem of a movement without leaders: it lacks parameters that define its success, an ability to consider the bigger picture, any conception of what ought to be, any ideological underpinnings and any control over its actions. The disparate opposition groups have managed a marriage of convenience that revolves around a single goal: removal of the President. As I have mentioned before, removal of the President does not solve Syria’s underlying problems. In fact, removal of the President coupled with an interim government composed of the military will likely entrench the worst elements of the regime, Egypt serves as a prime example of this outcome.

In the absence of the opposition being able to assess its own success, allow me to highlight some of their achievements:
a) The breakdown of the ‘fear’ mentality in Syria;
b) The lifting of the emergency law;
c) The election law;
d) The party law; and
e) Citizenship rights for Kurds.

Hopefully, removal of article 8 of the constitution is soon added to the list.

These are reforms that every Syrian wants, no matter how ardent they are in supporting the regime. There is no going back to how it was before.

Before a hundred angry people respond telling me that these reforms don’t mean anything when the army is still violently cracking down on protesters, please consider the fact that the failure to engage with the reformist elements within government only strengthens the position of those wanting a crackdown. I agree that violence has to stop, but at no stage did the protest movement acknowledge that these reforms are a good start. It has been month after month of rejection, and with every rejection the protest movement strengthened the hand of the most violent within the regime – something which is only exacerbated by the violent elements within the opposition taking over towns, threatening the territorial integrity of the country and attacking and killing soldiers.

So, when we read that the protest movement lacks leaders because “Everybody really feels anger towards leadership and authority on them,” is that supposed to comfort us? That we can look forward to anarchy if the regime falls, because the protesters “can take a week to decide on the Friday slogan and tend to coordinate little else.” Or that they knock down any potential leader, because they are fed up of being governed? How does this engender any sort of confidence in the general population that there is a future for Syria if the opposition succeeds? More importantly, I fear that having unleashed these disparate and non-reconcilable forces against the regime, no one within the opposition actually has any chance of stopping them- they are a power unto themselves.

So in an effort to help whatever semblance of an opposition leadership in its very important role of deciding on the Friday slogan can I offer a few suggestions:

1) The Friday of reflection;
2) The Friday of contemplation for the future of the country;
3) The Friday where we decide what we want;
4) The Friday of accepting negotiation.

Finally, however flawed, the new party law now enables the various elements constituting the opposition to form political parties based on ideological underpinnings. I hope the opposition accept it, use it, and I wish them all the best in achieving their goals when working within the system.

regards.

August 7th, 2011, 1:18 am

 

Tara said:

MM@179

Thank you for your post in regard to the young christian Syrian priest.

ويدخل الجيش المدن وتتعالى هتافات الشارع وتغرق الكنيسة في صمتها، «نعم نعم…»، وتبرق الدمعة من جديد. أما مستقبل الحراك فلـيس إلا «إماراتٍ سلفــية»، وكأن لا مسيحيين ولا علمانيين يخرجون كل جمـعةٍ من المساجد، وكأن لا مناضلين مدنيين يُخطفون من ديارهم، وكأننا لم نكن جيراناً، وكأن لا ماضيَ مشتركاً لنا، وكأن لا خـبز ولا ملـح ولا قهوة بيننا. من أفواه بعض خطبائنا يطلق رصاص الكلـمات، ومن حناجرهم تصـدح عبارات المديح والولاء لتُخــرس ما لا يمكن إخراسه: حنجرة ابراهيم قاشوش. من جــسد المسيح على الهياكل ينزف حمزة وهاجر، ومن جنب ذلك الـناصري تمتزج حماة بدير الزور، ويردد الواعظ من جديد «مندسون مندسون».

Whenever I start to lose the nicest thing about my Syrian identity, A voice from a Syrian Christian or Syrian Alawi resonate to remind me what I believed in was not a life long disillusion..

August 7th, 2011, 1:25 am

 

syau said:

Abughassan,

I heard the reports a few days ago, the driver was located and arrested first, then, as one arrest follows another, then rest were apprehended.

Tara,

“The new sanctions should completely block oil and gas export from Syria. We’ll see then how shabiha salary get paid.”

Do you people not understand that sanctions affect the Syrian people; the poorest will be affected more than anyone. You people claim to be Syrian, yet you either do not think of the consequences of what you are writing, or you do not care for a Single Syrian and only care about your agenda being met.
Syria is used to surviving with sanctions, it’s done it before and can do it again if need be. Let’s consider your brilliant idea was realised. What next?

Imperialistic powers have no leverage in Syria; all they can do is impose sanctions which hurt none other than the countries people. Those true to their country would oppose such a move.

Daleanderson,

The revolution is officially backed by Al Qaeda.
The Syrian revolution has brought nothing but murders and mutilations, fabrications, destruction of infrastructure, insurgencies and sectarian division. It’s a terrorist revolution.

Supporting this revolution is supporting terror.

August 7th, 2011, 1:27 am

 

jad said:

Tara,
“The new sanctions should completely block oil and gas export from Syria. We’ll see then how shabiha salary get paid.”
What do you care, you live safe in the states not in Syria as you claimed.
Unless every Syrian living in Syria is a Shabeeh to you then this sanctions you are shamelessly supporting will hurt every one of them (the Syrian).
The average Syrian will be hurt more than those with billions in the banks, do you realize this simple fact or no?
How fake of you to claim having the higher moral yet support the killing and depriving Syrians…very high moral indeed

Abughassan,
The moment you mention that you are not a pure Sunni, then every radical will attack you.

August 7th, 2011, 1:40 am

 

SYR.EXPAT said:

Dialogue is definitely the way to go. This is why an opposition leader who called for a national conference to discuss a peaceful transfer of power was arrested along with his two teenage sons. This was reported by Reuters. Can someone verify.

القوات السورية تعتقل الزعيم المعارض البني

قالت جماعة حقوقية ان القوات السورية اعتقلت يوم السبت الزعيم المعارض وليد البني وهو معارض مخضرم لحكم حزب البعث دعا الى مؤتمر وطني للاتفاق على انتقال سلمي للسلطة بعد خمسة شهور من الانتفاضة التي تشهدها البلاد.

وقالت المنظمة السورية لحقوق الانسان (سواسية) في بيان ارسل الى رويترز ان الشرطة السرية اعتقلت البني الذي كان مختبئا كما اعتقلت معه اثنين من ابنائه في سن المراهقة ببلدة التل مسقط
رأسه الى الشمال مباشرة من العاصمة دمشق.

August 7th, 2011, 2:32 am

 

SYR.EXPAT said:

“Supporting this revolution is supporting terror”
These types of statements are to be expected from the supporters of tyranny.

August 7th, 2011, 2:36 am

 

Dale Andersen said:

Memo To: SYAU

RE: “…Do you people not understand that sanctions affect the Syrian people; the poorest will be affected more than anyone…”

We understand. The poor always suffer first and longest. It’s one of the sad facts of being poor. In the words of Bill Clinton, we feel their pain.

Sanctions are like a slow strangulation. And over time, as the money runs out and the poor are down to eating rats and the men in the al-Mukhabarat are sleeping in the empty jail cells because their homes have been foreclosed on and their wives have left them…and you’d think when things get so bad a man can’t afford a nail to scratch his ass with…you’d think people would say, “Hey! Okay! We give up!” You’d think people would see the light. You’d think they’d wise up. But no! For some loopy reason, they always elect to back the dictator and fight on. And the country ends up like Zimbabwe where it takes a wheelbarrow filled with money to buy a loaf of bread. Resistance to sanctions makes no sense unless you look at it from the point of view of pride.

But you can’t eat pride.

August 7th, 2011, 2:50 am

 

NK said:

Aus4Syria

These are not reforms not because they flawed, or because they are not up to par with what is required, they are not reforms because they’re the same old laws written a different way. they offer absolutely nothing new. none.

a) The breakdown of the ‘fear’ mentality in Syria;

believe it or not, the vast majority of Syrians still fear being dragged from their homes and tortured in the basements of mukhabarat prisons (and they have every right to be terrified). The fear mentality is weakened every day by it’ll always be there as long as the the mukhabarat apparatus is intact, if calm returns to the streets tomorrow, the wall will be up again; twice as thick.

b) The lifting of the emergency law;

This will be significant is the regime and its thugs cared one bit about the law or due process, as long as the judicial branch is hostage to this regime emergency law is irrelevant

c) The election law;

Do you mean the law which will be used to elect another Baathist parliament ? the one under which the elections will be monitored by a baathist committee, appointed by the president ?

d) The party law;

Let’s assume I want to start a political party tomorrow, how the hell will I put together 2000 members with at least 100 members from 7 different governorates each, representing every aspect of Syrian society (whatever that means, since there is no clear criteria), and getting the approval of the central baathist committee, this law is a farce, by all measures.

e) Citizenship rights for Kurds.

For some Kurds, as I understand it around 35,000 were granted citizenship out of 300,000. and while this is still a good thing, it was nothing more than a cheap attempt to buy the loyalty of Kurds so they don’t join the uprising.

Hopefully, removal of article 8 of the constitution is soon added to the list.

Didn’t you hear ? by the end of the year the new elected parliament (consisting of mostly Baathists and their lackies) will have the opportunity to discuss if this article needs to be changed. Care to guess what their response would be.

You want to know what I would do if I were Bashar, well I would declare a general amnesty under my personal guarantee for every movement wishing to partake in dialogue (including the MB), hold a 10 day conference that I personally attend and come up with a unified statement including a clear road map for moving the country towards a democratic civil state, announce a bill of rights similar to the American one, and announce my intent to leave office at the conclusion of my second term in 2014. Then form a joint committee to oversee the reform progress and work with the current regime to achieve total reform starting with a new constitution, party law, and election law and ending with a parliamentary elections under international supervision (Arab countries, Turkey and Iran can help here). But then I do care about Syria and Syrian lives, what a shame.

P.S. before the rabid menhebakites jump all over my post about including the MB is the amnesty and allowing them to take part in this dialogue. No this isn’t because I like the MB or approve of their agenda (whatever it is), but this is the best way to silence them forever and force them to accept the will of the secular majority, it beats sending tanks to occupy Syrian cities should there really be any support for their movement. They once announced they want a civil state, what better way than to call their bluff.

August 7th, 2011, 3:02 am

 

SYR.EXPAT said:

Mass executions in Hama’s main square as Syrian resistance mounts

DEBKAfile Special Report August 5, 2011, 1:30 PM (GMT+02:00) Tags: Syrian uprising Bashar Assad UN Security Council US Turkey Russia Medvedev Hama

Thursday night, Aug. 4, the commanders of Syria’s military crackdown on the city of Hama ordered suspected protesters to be picked up off the streets for summary execution. Within hours, hundreds of victims were “executed” by firing squad in Nasser Square without benefit of an investigation or a trial on the orders of Gen. Mohammad Deeb Zaitoun, head of Syrian Political Security Department and Gen. Abdul-Fattah Qedssiyeh, head of the Military Intelligence Department.
They made this decision when the Syrian army’s 4th Division and the Political Security Department’s fighting brigades were unable to overcome escalating rebel resistance.
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev broke the big power taboo against pointing the finger at Bashar Assad in person for the brutality of the crackdown on the Syrian opposition, when he warned the Syrian president Thursday that he faced “a sad fate” if he failed to introduce reforms in his country and open a peaceful dialogue with the opposition.
These remarks sounded as though they came from a different planet from the ferocious violence raging for the last three days against the populations of Hama in the north and Deir el-Zour in the east. In today’s Syria, the prospects of the regime halting the violence and entering into “peaceful dialogue” are completely unreal.
Medvedev went on to say: “Regrettably, large numbers of people are dying there. That causes us grave concern.” And, more to the point, “We are watching how the situation is developing. It’s changing and our approach is changing as well.”
Thursday, Aug. DEBKAfile carried the following report under the caption: Orontes River runs red as Syrian anti-aircraft guns pound Hama.
Horrifying images of bodies and limbs floating in the Orontes River in Hama were aired by Syrian state television early Thursday, Aug. 4. Contrary to official claims that they belonged to Syrian soldiers torn to pieces by protesters, DEBKAfile reports they are the victims of Syrian tank fire and ZU-23 automatic anti-aircraft artillery trained on residential buildings and streets in the last 48 hours as the dead pile up in the streets.
Citizens cowering in their homes are throwing the dead out of windows and off roofs into the river.
They are reliving the terrors of the massacre President Bashar Assad’s father inflicted on this city of half-a-million in 1982 which left 30,000 dead.
Our sources report that the Syrian ruler decided to take advantage of three events for unleashing an all-out assault against rebellious Hama:
1. World attention was riveted on the deposed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s trial which opened in Cairo Wednesday. As Mubarak was stunningly wheeled into the courtroom on a stretcher and deposited in an iron cage, Syrian tanks thundered into central Hama, indiscriminately shelling buildings and torching them. Their anti-aircraft guns mowed down the rebels who were firing anti-tank weapons from roadblocks.
Buildings suspected of housing snipers at windows or on rooftops were flattened.
Casualty figures cannot be confirmed because the Syrian authorities have cut off all the city’s ground and cell telephone and Internet links. Electrical current and water are also switched off. The dead are believed to be in the hundreds and rising all the time because the thousands of injured cannot be reached for medical care.
The satellite phones in the hands of some of the dissident leaders provide the only source of information on the situation in the embattled city.
2. The crisis between the Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan and the army after the entire top command resigned in a body, which Assad expected would preoccupy all the decision-making levels in Ankara to the exclusion of Syria. He counted on no one in authority venturing to order the Turkish units poised on the Syrian border for weeks to cross into northern Syria and establish a buffer zone there to ease the siege on Hama and other towns.
3. The UN Security Council convening Wednesday night routinely condemned the killing of civilians in Syria and human rights abuses but stopped at approving sanctions or any concrete penalties for the delinquent Assad regime.
Although US UN representative Susan Rice called the statement “an important and strong step,” Bashar Assad was not impressed and the Syrian army’s onslaught on Hama kept going through the night.
Assad was further encouraged by an event in the US Congress. After the Senate Tuesday, Aug. 3 approved the bill raising the national debt ceiling, the lawmakers were scheduled to turn to the crisis in Syria. However, US Ambassador Robert Ford, on hand to brief the senators, saw them hurrying to leave Capitol Hill. Only one senator remained for the briefing.
The Syrian ruler has therefore concluded he can safely ignore international opinion. In the face of US and Western indifference, he can continue to mercilessly slaughter his people without fear of the sort of intervention they undertook in Libya or UN sanctions.

August 7th, 2011, 3:14 am

 

joujou said:

85% syria are pro assad.
syrians are pro assad.
syrians love syria

August 7th, 2011, 3:34 am

 

NK said:

another Salafi

August 7th, 2011, 3:39 am

 

joujou said:

وأصل إلى تلك القرية الهادئة بعد غياب دام أكثر من 17 عاماً ، أحمل لأم صديقي المغترب أمانة من ابنها. في تلك القرية المسيحية الهادئة ظاهرياً والتي تكن في في قلبها بركاناً على هؤلاء الذين يروعون من يحتاج للذهاب إلى حمص.
تقول لي وبطيبتهاا لمعتادة الله يقطعن حرمونا نعرف نعيش هدون أيشو بدن! حفيدتها التي كانت تعيش في باب سباع هربت بعد أن هددت عدة مرات بالاعتداء كونها مسيحية. آخر يسأل من قبل متظاهر سلمي يقطع الطريق بين حماة وقرى وادي النصارى: هل أنت علوي أم سني؟ وهناك من يروج حتى الآن أن الدولة هي من تقوم بنشر الطائفية؟ وهي التي تصفي أبناءها وأن المسيحين والعلويين في سوريا ينزلون إلى الشارع! عجباًيابلدنا
أصبح من يكذب هو من يسمع ومن يقتل هو من يرحم ومن يخرب البلد هو المناضل…
الله يحمي سوريا والعزة لسوريا رغم أنوف الكارهين

August 7th, 2011, 3:43 am

 

Aboud said:

@206 “not just hospitals but even houses have generators for electricity,because of the frequent cut in electricity,”

It’s just one “shoot yourself in the foot” after another with you Assadstanians, isn’t it? Electricity hasn’t been rationed in two years now. You need a special permit to get a generator for a house and store. As for hospitals, what do you think electric generators run on? The fumes from junior’s farts? Maybe the menhebaks like to smell them, but they don’t run generators.

@209 “Can you tell me how many people demonstrated the fall of Assad last Friday in Hama? I tell you: NONEEEEEE. ”

File this under a bulging file called “Baathists hang themselves”. How many Hamwis came out to welcome the army for “liberating” them? None. There are no Alawite villages near Hama, so you can’t even put together a fake menhebak demonstration.

And thanks for admitting that the only way junior can put down a demonstration is by sending in tanks. FYI, not the sign of a popular president.

The continued gloating of the menhebaks here over the continued massacres in Hama is disgraceful. They care nothing for Syria, and their loyalties lie only in supporting a sectarian little boy who should never have been president in the first place. Add Assadstanians to their list of traits.

Junior has no tool but brute force. He has displayed an appalling incapacity for any creative solutions.

Truly, Besho’s incompetence surprised even his most vehement opponents.

@231 “You people claim to be Syrian, yet you either do not think of the consequences of what you are writing, or you do not care for a Single Syrian and only care about your agenda being met.”

Hypocrisy, thy name is menhebak. Actually the only consequences the menhebak scums care about are the ones that affect them. But when the army is sent in to massacre civilians, all their “loyalties” to Syria are forgotten, all the “suffering of the poor” ignored, the only thing that matters is that smug little scum sitting in the West can gloat over images of tanks in the streets.

These are the disgraceful scum that junior’s support base has been reduced to. This is why the Germans said that junior’s political career is now behind him.

August 7th, 2011, 4:54 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

most regime supporters are hasty in admitting that there are armed salafi groups or what ever in syria, the claim that they take advantage of “pro-reform” protesters and hijack them. they are reluctant to acknowledge the availability of some genuine anti-bashar elements that have a legitimate right to protest. so what has bashar done to filter out the good from the bad? NOTHING.
he wont admit that there people that want him gone. and instead only acknowledged pro-reform protesters. this is his biggest mistake so far, his lack of accountability.
if it were up to me i would allow peaceful protesting. how?
an area that is protected by the security forces, their goal is to protect the protesters and make sure no vandalism is done. any one protesting outside that area can be arrested. then we can really know whats going on in the country, until then im going to continue being part of Bashar’s headache….no wait…tumor.

August 7th, 2011, 5:11 am

 

Aboud said:

And how quickly the Baathist scum forget Dar’a. It is much smaller than Hama, it was under siege for two months. And yet can any menhebak scum say that there are no more demonstrations there? Demonstrations have even returned to the Omari Mosque.

Using the military to subdue demonstrations has been a failure, obviously. Well, obvious to anyone except a fanatical menhebak, who care more about Iranian donkeys and sectarian Baathists, than they do about the rest of Syria.

It truly speaks volumes of the menhebakites desperation, that the only “victory” they can create from their imagination, is that there are no demonstrations in Hama right now…while it is under siege…getting shelled…getting shot up. Oh, and in Ramadan.

I’d like to see how many Baathist scum will come out and wave junior’s picture if doing so ran them the risk of getting shelled by tanks.

August 7th, 2011, 5:14 am

 

syau said:

الثورة السورية السلمية – تهريب 30 شحنة اسلحة لسوريا

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zTaumgA7Pc&feature=youtu.be

How peaceful this terrorist revolution is.

August 7th, 2011, 5:20 am

 

Aboud said:

Anti-junior demonstration in Tripoli, Lebanon last night. When was the last time the Baathist (edited for insult) in Tripoli came out to support junior?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FG96PDtRmwg&feature=player_embedded

@238 What an infantile “you too!” piece of garbage. Turkey confiscates Iranian weapons bound for junior, and the next day SANA comes up with a BS story about smuggled arms. Through a *customs post*. In a shipment that includes *hallucinogenic* pills. Only a menhebak ayatollah (edited for insult)lover would think that was remotely credible.

August 7th, 2011, 5:51 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

there are countless smuggling routes between syria and lebanon, apparently these smugglers are so idiotic they chose to go through customs…hmm maybe thay also paid the Value Added Tax when they entered.

——————————————————————-
High scores:
Hafez: 20,000+
Bashar: 2000+

August 7th, 2011, 5:58 am

 

MNA said:

د. بثينة شعبان : إذا كان وزير خارجية تركيا قادماً لنقل رسالة حازمة إلى سورية فإنه سيسمع كلاماً أكثر حزماً بالنسبة للموقف التركي

د. شعبان تنتقد عدم ادانة تركيا لعمليات القتل التي يتعرض لها الأمن والجيش

August 7th, 2011, 6:01 am

 

Aboud said:

“hmm maybe thay also paid the Value Added Tax when they entered.”

ROFL! They hid them under posters of Rafik Harriri.

August 7th, 2011, 6:16 am

 

ss said:

220 by Sheila
“Aboud,As much as I agree with you and feel the same frustration, I urge you to watch your language”

Aboud has been angry lately as the business of fake videos and clips has been less than expected and yes thanks for the tanks and the army.

221 by Majedkhaldoon “I did not find Abughassan comments as impartial, I think it is contrdictory.some one with his education and stature should not be saying that this revolution as MB”

Another angry MB who is shooting a respectful opposition fellow (Abo G) who has been against the Assad in all his posts but there is something about his writings which makes you raise your hat to him in respect. Well Majedkhaldoon, being from those radical oppositions, who does not understand the meaning of negotiations, who wants more blood shed by asking for continuous demonstration, who wants western intervention, who wants Russian intervention, Turkish troops,etc. Majedkhaldoon is fedup by honest and classy opposition who wants the best for Syria, and at the same time they want president Assad out. Just an example how narrow minded, stoney minded, and stupid the so called revolution leaders are

August 7th, 2011, 7:29 am

 

Aboud said:

Hehe, just remembered that the same ayatollah cheering the assault on Hama, were also gloating over the army’s attack on Homs a couple of weeks ago. How did that turn out for you? Stopped the demonstrations yet? LOL!

The Besho Brigades don’t even have to get out of Hama for the demonstrations to start again. Once they stop firing, people will take to whatever streets they can. Just like Dar’a, Baniyas and Telkelakh went back to protesting once the firing stopped.

Or do the menhebak manayek think that junior has unlimited ammunition?

“as the business of fake videos and clips has been less than expected”

Wow, so much material in just half a sentence. Where do I begin 🙂

1) Fake videos? So the entire revolution has been one fake Youtube video clip. Denial apparently is a river that runs deep in Assadstan.

2) The demonstrations in the rest of the country have more than made up for Hama. Or have you been oblivious to Damascus? If ignorance was bliss, the menhebaks would be way up there in the “happiest people” rankings.

3) The video of tanks shelling civilian areas has done irreparable harm to junior in every way imaginable. Of course, only a menhebak would need that explained to him.

4) The only “victory” the desperate, grasping-at-straws Baathists can imagine out of this mess, is that there have been no videos from Hama for a few days. And what happens when the electricity and lines come back? I hope Asma likes Holland, she and her brats will be visiting junior there alot

August 7th, 2011, 7:32 am

 

ss said:

الجيش السوري يقتحم «دير الزور»

May God bless the army men and bring a decisive victory to them.
Go army go; Saturday, Sunday, Mon, Tues, Wed, Thu, and Friday until you liberate Syria from the terrorists gangs and armed thugs. The Jihadist wish to perform Jihad during the month of Ramadan turned to be indeed a difficult task. Death to terrorists.

August 7th, 2011, 7:40 am

 

ss said:

244 Aboud,

You are using a lot of “LOL”, and smilly faces in your post which tells me:

[Edited for insults]
3. You are trying to cover the pain of the screw by smiling
4. You could well be still in your childhood phase of growing

August 7th, 2011, 7:41 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ss
i have taken part in a demonstration in midan, we harmed no one and damaged nothing. the regime thugs dispersed us with force.
this is what you support.

August 7th, 2011, 7:43 am

 

Aboud said:

LOL! Could the menhebaks sound any more desperate? Hey [edited for insults and bad language] cheers on an army from the safe shores of the West? You want a fight, go and enlist and die for junior. I dare you 🙂

A 15 year old in Khaldia who risks his life in demonstrations every night has more guts and courage than the foreign living chicken-shit menhebak tants.

“You are using a lot of “LOL”, and smilly faces in your post ”

Ah, then your amateur junk-psychiatry confuses nervous laughter and giggling, the sort that your “no-one-loves-me-anymore” president indulged in his first…cough…”speech”, and what I like to refer as nasty, meant-to-hurt gloating and cackling. If this was a cartoon I’d be twirling my mustache.

So, when is besho going to take a summer visit outside of Damascus? LOL! 🙂 🙂 🙂

And how can I not smile when us Homsis come up with these gems

Bashar akhtfoooooo….khanzeer tale3 la abooo!
ROFL! Allah yehmikon ahl Homs, khazoq bi teezo la besho.

August 7th, 2011, 7:43 am

 

ss said:

248 Aboud;

Remember your mother Sheila on this forum. She begged you to wach your language and control yourself becaue apparently you are losing it.

Angry, smilly faces and “LOL” phrases in the same post?????are you nuts?

I have some one who can defend me and doing the work well. I think your people need you “little chicken” to go their and defend your salafi, radials, who are screaming your help. It is a better cause for you. This is your cause not mine. It is Ramadan so if you are killed you would meet your virgins soon

August 7th, 2011, 7:54 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

1) the “Syria is fine” is the most delusional sentence in the world. its the first step in the 7 stages of acceptance and apparently no one has left that stage. all over syria, the government assures us “syria is fine”. you will find it everywhere, its like a poor mom that has lost its child yet is claiming her child is just asleep.
2) i really love those hypocrites living in the west that take advantage of their residence’s freedom to demonstrate and march against said nation policy on syria, yet the very regime they support does not permit that right.

August 7th, 2011, 7:56 am

 

Aboud said:

“It is Ramadan so if you are killed you would meet your vitgins soon, ”

ROFL! Meet my vitgins? Sorry, what religion is that? Are you shaking so much with rage that you can’t spell “virgins”? Yeah, I guess we will see vitgins in heaven, along with that other Baathist innovation, the grounding machine. LOL! 🙂

“I have some one who can defend me and doing the work well”

The typical coward’s cop-out. “Someone else’s son is fighting, so why should I?”

I’d like the opinion of people well versed in military science; how well can an army be doing its job if it can’t even subdue an ill defined insurrection after more than five months?

It doesn’t take any skill at all to park 300 tanks in Al-Asi square and fire off tank shells at random. And even one of your fellow Baathists admitted the Besho Brigades rolled in unopposed into Jisr al Shoghour (but they needed 10,000 men even for that).

To me, this just indicates either low motivation, or low competency. I think it’s both. Never mind, you can motivate them with promises of vitgins ROFL! 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 8:00 am

 

ss said:

251. Some guy in Damascus

Its still afternoon in Midan, why you dont get yourself out there and demonstrate, its a better cause for you than sitting behind you PC. Dont waste a minute, MB scum. Dont tell me you are out of business already! its still the first week of Ramadan; you still have 3 weeks to go to commit suicide, ops, sorry; to commit Jihad.

August 7th, 2011, 8:02 am

 

Aboud said:

“why you dont get yourself out there and demonstrate,”

Said the Baathist who can’t even organize a pro-menhebak tea party where he lives. The Syrian people go out and demonstrate even at the risk of getting shot. Junior could be getting sodomized by Ar’or and the Baathists wouldn’t dare save their president unless they had a tank bridage behind them. Cowards in every meaning of the word 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 8:07 am

 

ss said:

252. Aboud,

You should read well before you post, or perhaps you should check yourself to a mental facility as you might be crazy. Go back to post 250: Where did I say Vitgins???I know you are going nuts, and being screwed now. You may be in pain due to lack of Jihadist in Syria, but that should not affect your ability to read correctly. Dont worry, I will send a message to the army to give you a hance to do Jihad,,,I mean its really not fair

August 7th, 2011, 8:08 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ss 251
tackle the comment, not the commentator.

August 7th, 2011, 8:08 am

 

syau said:

Syria tv reports a truck transporting car parts from Lebanon on the Dabousieh boarder (Lebanon/Homs) has been seized by boarder control after they discovered a large amount of weapons hidden inside the truck.

Some guy in Damascus

“tackle the comment, not the commentator. ”

And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? Read his posts with an unbiased view and you will see how much Aboud attacks the commentator, not the comment. You can go back as far as you like, his comments are all the same in their attacks.

August 7th, 2011, 8:08 am

 

ss said:

254: Aboudist;

Really a gentleman, look at him guys; he smiles after every angry post he send. What a child. I think you should staep aside and leave writing to some rough meet MB (you are still raw) who can defend their cause better than some kid with a personality disorder who is angry, smiley, pissed off, and happy at the same time. Go get some treatment. May be you have bipolar. Anyway you made my morning today, it was great to see your frustration in the posts you just delivered. Have a good day and I wish your Jihadist the best of luck. This month did not turn to be good.

August 7th, 2011, 8:14 am

 

Aboud said:

ROFL! Oh my God, look at this post, full of mistakes while he whines he didn’t make a mistake

“yperhaps” should be perhaps.

“Where did I say Vitgins???” right before you edited it 🙂

“ddue” should be dude. What are you, a surfer beach bum?

“hance to doi Jihad,,,” ROFL!

“but that should not affect your ability to read correctly” My ability to read is fine, but your ability to write seems to be seriously impaired 🙂

But no seriously, how’s the “swamp the area with tanks and fire randomly” tactic working out for you? Will Buthaina Shitban have a tank platoon with her when she meets with the Turkish FM? Why doesn’t Besho send his tanks to the UN.

Actually, since Italy recalled its ambassador, it seems to me kind of gutless and undignified on the part of the menhebaks to keep theirs in Rome.

But then, undignified displays of crass sycophancy is the norm from regime trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim.

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

August 7th, 2011, 8:17 am

 

ss said:

258: You are indeed delusional. I would ask you to read well. I do not see any evidence of that: ddue? Doi?….where??Still the psych facility is open. run kido run

August 7th, 2011, 8:20 am

 

Aboud said:

ROFL! Oh my God, look at this post, full of mistakes while he whines he didn’t make a mistake

“yperhaps” should be perhaps.

“Where did I say Vitgins???” right before you edited it 🙂

“ddue” should be dude. What are you, a surfer beach bum?

“hance to doi Jihad,,,” ROFL!

“but that should not affect your ability to read correctly” My ability to read is fine, but your ability to write seems to be seriously impaired 🙂

But no seriously, how’s the “swamp the area with tanks and fire randomly” tactic working out for you? Will Buthaina Shitban have a tank platoon with her when she meets with the Turkish FM? Why doesn’t Besho send his tanks to the UN.

Actually, since Italy recalled its ambassador, it seems to me kind of gutless and undignified on the part of the menhebaks to keep theirs in Rome.

But then, undignified displays of crass sycophancy is the norm from regime trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim.

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

August 7th, 2011, 8:21 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@SYAU
i tried engaging ss with dialogue, he lashed out at me. if ss is pissed why doesn’t he tell aboud what i told him?
im sorry ss, i did not understand your last comment.

August 7th, 2011, 8:21 am

 

Aboud said:

Oh my God, look at this post, full of mistakes while he whines he didn’t make a mistake

“yperhaps” should be perhaps.

“Where did I say Vitgins???” right before you edited it 🙂

“ddue” should be dude. What are you, a surfer beach bum?

“hance to doi Jihad,,,” ROFL!

“but that should not affect your ability to read correctly” My ability to read is fine, but your ability to write seems to be seriously impaired 🙂

But no seriously, how’s the “swamp the area with tanks and fire randomly” tactic working out for you? Will Buthaina Shitban have a tank platoon with her when she meets with the Turkish FM? Why doesn’t Besho send his tanks to the UN.

Actually, since Italy recalled its ambassador, it seems to me kind of gutless and undignified on the part of the menhebaks to keep theirs in Rome.

But then, undignified displays of crass sycophancy is the norm from regime trumpets like Taleb Ibrahim.

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

August 7th, 2011, 8:22 am

 

Aboud said:

Posts not getting through again. Someone should fix the comments section 🙂

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

And nice job to the menhebak, whining in a post full of mistakes that he didn’t make a mistake 🙂 Keep it up, maybe you’ll gift me more mistakes LOL!

August 7th, 2011, 8:24 am

 

Aboud said:

Someone should fix the comments section, posts sometimes not getting through. Don’t blame me if you see the same post numerous times 🙂

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

And nice job to the menhebak, whining in a post full of mistakes that he didn’t make a mistake 🙂 Keep it up, maybe you’ll gift me more mistakes LOL!

August 7th, 2011, 8:31 am

 

ss said:

251 and 259. Some GUY in Damascus;

I am not pissed. I was just busy with your other fellow, the kid Aboud.

It is allowed to demonstrate, people are doing that. In Lattakia; Alraml Alfilasteni area, people demonstrate every single night and the number in thousands; yesterday there were around 10.000 people out chanting the fall of Assad. They demonstrated freely and they do that every single night with no report of death. If you want to demonstrate peacefully; you are more than welcome. The problem is with the armed men. When you are out to shoot, kill, and bring destruction, then you should be punished for your act.

Syria is not fine now, but will be. Any nation may be faced with struggle, we had the same history in 1980s, and yes we made it out of that mess. Life will go on and we are going to be fine again. For people like you who wants Assad out “for no reason other than I want him out” then it will not be fine. But you+MB+Qaeda+radicals+conservative decent people may represents 50% of the people of Syria; well the other 50% does not support you, and the question remains???why in the world he should exit???

August 7th, 2011, 8:32 am

 

Aboud said:

Someone should fix the comments section, posts sometimes not getting through. Don’t blame me if you see the same post numerous times 🙂

@257 “And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months? ”

Aboud has been, time and again, trying to get a simple answer to a simple question. Why is Najati Tayara in jail? Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question, is your own fault and no one else.

Of all the people who have been banned from this website, all of them have been menhebaks. Says alot 🙂 Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB, like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL!

And nice job to the menhebak, whining in a post full of mistakes that he didn’t make a mistake 🙂 Keep it up, maybe you’ll gift me more mistakes LOL!

“In Lattakia; Alraml Alfilasteni area, people demonstrate every single night and the number in thousands; yesterday there were around 10.000 people out chanting the fall of Assad.”

Junior just hasn’t gotten around to killing them yet. Hama and Dayr el Zour were allowed to demonstrate for a month while your weakling president got his brigades ready.

August 7th, 2011, 8:34 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ss
you cannot protest in any way, ss. i personally protested and i was faced with a violent crackdown, thats how it goes down in midan.
and as for why i dont want bashar president?
i have many reasons, but the most basic right is freedom of opinion, give us that right and all good will come along.

August 7th, 2011, 8:40 am

 

Aliccie said:

Aboud @ 249

“And how can I not smile when us Homsis come up with these gems”

I like how syrians mix chants with music and ‘chorus’, very creative. Better than SS’s repetitious death monologue.

BTW, what are they chanting ? Is it improvised, do the words change each time or not ?

SS @ 260

What you say is in contradiction to what Guy in Damascas said ! He said his peaceful demo was broken up, but you say it’s allowed to demonstrate, “If you want to demonstrate peacefully; you are more than welcome. ”

Seems the rules are different, orders aren’t clear, maybe they don’t like the chants/sons ?

August 7th, 2011, 8:40 am

 

Aboud said:

Someone should fix the comments section‭, ‬posts sometimes not getting through‭. ‬Don’t blame me if you see the same post numerous times‭ :)‬

@257‭ “‬And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months‭? “‬

Aboud has been‭, ‬time and again‭, ‬trying to get a simple answer to a simple question‭. Why is Najati Tayara in jail‭? ‬Just because you people are too scared to try to tackle that question‭, ‬is your own fault and no one else‭.‬

Of all the people who have been banned from this website‭, ‬all of them have been menhebaks‭. ‬Says alot‭ 🙂 ‬Now you’ll accuse the moderator of having been bought by the MB‭, ‬like you accuse Swiss journalists of having been bought LOL‭!‬

And nice job to the menhebak‭, ‬whining in a post full of mistakes that he didn’t make a mistake‭ 🙂 ‬Keep it up‭, ‬maybe you’ll gift me more mistakes LOL‭!‬

“n Lattakia; Alraml Alfilasteni area, people demonstrate every single night and the number in thousands; yesterday there were around 10.000 people out chanting the fall of Assad.”

Dar’a demonstrated for a month, before the tanks were sent in.
Telkelakh demonstrated for three, before the tanks were sent in.
Homs, Hama, Dayr el Zour…you get the idea. If junior hasn’t sent in his pathetic coward of an army, it’s because he still hasn’t gotten around to it.

August 7th, 2011, 8:42 am

 

Aboud said:

I’m having a problem posting. Alot of my posts aren’t even appearing.

August 7th, 2011, 8:43 am

 

Aboud said:

Seems to be a problem if the posts are too long. Oh well 🙂

“And Aboud has been doing what exactly for the past few months?”

Aboud has been trying for a month to get a simple answer to a simple question; Why is Najati Tayara still in jail? If none of the menhebaks have the guts to take on such a simple question, that’s your problem.

August 7th, 2011, 8:45 am

 

hsyrian said:

Claim from our Ntrepid Muslim Brother
“”””
Electricity hasn’t been rationed in two years now. You need a special permit to get a generator for a house and store. As for hospitals, what do you think electric generators run on?

“”””
Many shops ( even with non perishable goods ) have diesel power generator to wave any electrical power cut.

In hospitals , a diesel power generator is “MANDATORY” and
the electrically operated life-sustaining medical devices are equipped with a backup battery .

These babies dying in a nursery is the Syrian version of the fake testimony of Kuwaiti girl in 1990 , it took two years to be refuted.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nayirah_%28testimony%29

Disclaimers
Public Relation firms have something in common with Recycling Industry : they recycle garbage and make huge profits .

Still my little unanswered academic question:

How many INNOCENT people have been killed by the Muslim Brothers between 1976 and 1982 ?

August 7th, 2011, 8:47 am

 

Aboud said:

By the way is Butt-haina Sha3ban going to have a tank platoon with her when she meets the Turkish FM? Why doesn’t Besho go and send his tanks to the UN?

Also, Italy has withdrawn its ambassador. But apparently, the regime is so gutless and lacking in dignity that it has no problem in keeping its trumpet in Rome.

August 7th, 2011, 8:48 am

 

beaware said:

Getting real about Al-Jazeera’s ‘real news’
Friday, August 5, 2011
David Judson – david.judson@hurriyet.com.tr
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=getting-real-about-al-jazeera8217s-8216real-news8217-2011-08-05

As anti-government protesters marched on the nation’s capital, the general manager of the main broadcaster sought to present all sides in the dispute. Citing the state of emergency, the government reined in the editor. The opposition party was banned from the air, protesters were banished from the studio. The “official” line was the only story.

I only mention this formative experience of the BBC’s founder John Reith (later to be “Lord Reith”) during the United Kingdom’s general strike of 1926 as an aside. It is just a minor detail worth keeping in mind as debate swirls yet again around the upstart Qatar broadcaster Al-Jazeera. The satellite channel has finally breached the electronic ramparts to reach cable subscribers in some parts of the United States. In Turkey, Al-Jazeera will soon begin a Turkish-language service and it is looking too at the local language market in Azerbaijan.

Al-Jazeera is hardly the first journalistic Don Quixote to tilt at the windmill of the Western monopoly on international communication. The first was probably Inter Press Service, a global news cooperative established in 1964 by an Italian and an Argentine in awe of the Cuban revolution. IPS actually still exists, but have you ever heard of it? Another martyr to the cause was “South,” a magazine launched by a group of Pakistani journalists in London in 1981. It went up in cinders a decade later, along with its patron, the Karachi banker Agha Hasan Abedi.

Only Al-Jazeera has seized the commanding heights of global journalism from the long dominant Anglo-Saxons. Converts now include U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton who not long ago praised its “real news.” This was a turn-around from the days when U.S. officials characterized it as a tool of terrorists. Don’t get me wrong. I’m a huge fan, a regular viewer and glad that I have something on which I can be in agreement with Clinton. I’m also on the edge of my seat to see what happens when the network arrives in Turkish next fall.

But the debate never dies and in Turkey it will surely grow: is it an independent TV channel or a tool of the Qatari emir? Several books, including the seminal work in 2006 by Hugh Miles, have examined that debate without really answering it.

But now an Arabic-speaking Japanese graduate student at an Egyptian university has. The first to examine Al-Jazeera not as a media scholar but as a political scientist, Munehiro Anzawa is clear in his conclusion: “…the Qatari government and the Emir of Qatar have manipulated Al-Jazeera as an effective political instrument.”

Since 1996, Qatar has pursued what Anzawa calls an “omnidirectional foreign policy” with Al-Jazeera at the heart. Keeping terrorists at bay by inviting spokesmen on the air…, buying off domestic frustration with sports programming…, playing Saudi Arabia against Iran.., courting America or Israel one day, tormenting them the next… This has been and is the game, Anzawa argues.

“Al-Jazeera as a Political Tool within the Contradictions of Qatar,” was submitted as a master’s thesis in May. Detailed and devastating, you can find it on the American University in Cairo website. The late Lord Reith would not be surprised at its conclusions.

August 7th, 2011, 8:49 am

 

Aliccie said:

My post didn’t show up either, maybe it will later.

I said – Aboud – I like that vid of the chanting, the way they mix with songs and chorus. Is it improvised, with different words ?

SS, you contradict yourself, you say demos are allowed, more than welcome, yet guy in damascus said his was broken up ? Different rules, conflicting orders ?

August 7th, 2011, 8:50 am

 

Aboud said:

“Many shops ( even with non perishable goods ) have diesel power generator to wave any electrical power cut.”

Not really, they get a hefty fine if they run one without a permit. That was the case many years ago, but these things make so much racket that not every shop could be allowed to have one.

“In hospitals , a diesel power generator is “MANDATORY” and
the electrically operated life-sustaining medical devices are equipped with a backup battery .”

And how long can a back up generator last for? Are you seriously claiming it can last a week to power an entire hospital? That’s if the hospital isn’t targeted in the first place.

August 7th, 2011, 8:50 am

 

beaware said:

Siddiqui: Possible dawn of democracy in Syria
By Haroon Siddiqui Editorial Page
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1035706–siddiqui-possible-dawn-of-democracy-in-syria
Syria is where Syrian Canadian Maher Arar was tortured. Syria is the police state where a Stasi-like secret service long ago terrified citizens into censoring even private conversations. Syria is where 2,000 pro-democracy civilians have been killed, thousands are missing and perhaps 15,000 are in jail — a record far worse than that of Libya before NATO intervened there.

Yet Bashar Assad is being allowed to get away with murder.

Ottawa has imposed a travel ban on the Assad clan, though none has ever come to Canada. Ottawa won’t permit the sale of arms, though we’ve never sold any to Syria.

This feckless response is in keeping with what others are doing. Not much. The European Union has imposed economic sanctions. The U.S. has tightened its existing ones, imposed in 2003 after Syria did not back the American invasion of Iraq.

If we were serious, the Harper government would have ordered Suncor-Petro Canada to pull up its hundreds of millions of dollars stake in the gas sector in Syria.

The EU would have stopped buying much of Syria’s 380,000 barrels a day oil.

The Security Council would have ordered the International Criminal Court to probe Assad for crimes against humanity, as was done with Moammar Gadhafi.

The U.S. no longer has the financial wherewithal or the will or credibility (post-Iraq and Afghanistan) to do much for the brave participants of the Arab Spring.

Barack Obama backed the Tunisians and Egyptians after the fact. On Bahrain, he sat by as Saudi troops went in to help the king there cut down the protesters. On Yemen, Obama dilly-dallies as the situation spirals out of control. On Libya, he reluctantly fell behind France and Britain.

On Syria, he didn’t even call for Assad’s ouster, even while being “shocked,” “horrified” and “appalled” by the civilian toll.

With NATO stalled in Libya, there is neither the appetite nor the resources to intervene in Syria under the doctrine of “responsibility to protect.”

The Assad regime thus calculated correctly that it could go on defying not only the will of its people but also the outside world.

It has mowed down protesters with machine gunfire and nail bombs, sprayed from rooftops and tanks. It has cut off water, food, electricity, phones and Internet in city after city. It has let corpses lie in the streets.

The crackdown by the security forces is led by Assad’s brother, Maher. Plainclothes militias led by cousins Munzer and Fawwaz are attacking minority businesses to start sectarian warfare, even as the regime poses as a protector of Christians, Alawites and Druze against the majority Sunni Muslims.

The Assads are Alawites, an offshoot of Shiites, but who incorporate pre-Islamic practices. It was an Alawite group in the army that staged a coup in 1963 and Hafez Assad became president in 1970. Upon his death in 2000, Bashar took over. Like most sons inheriting the dictator’s throne, he marketed himself as modern and progressive. He initiated a “Damascus Spring,” which, predictably, did not last long.

Ruling with an iron fist, father and son did keep communal harmony. But Syria has had no history of sectarian warfare, with the exception of a campaign 30 years ago by a militant wing of the Muslim Brotherhood against the Alawites, to polarize society and rally the majority Sunnis. Now it’s the Assad’s Alawite goons who are trying similar perverse tactics.

But the mass resistance remains ecumenical, with active participation by Christian intellectuals and human rights activists — Michel Kilo, Anwar al-Bonni and Ayman Abdul-Nour. Such prominent Alawites as the thinker Adonis and the playwright Samar Yazbek have broken with Assad.

Assad is also losing foreign allies. Russia is distancing itself. So is Turkey, which had cultivated him as part of a rapprochement with neighbours.

Syria has had a policy of raising its nuisance value — interfering in Lebanon, nurturing Hezbollah and Hamas, hosting controversial Palestinian leaders. Yet it has kept its 1974 ceasefire with Israel. When Assad recently sent protesters across the border into the Golan Heights, he served notice to Israel and the U.S. that the devil they knew could no longer be counted on if he were not given a free hand at home. But the domestic uprising has its own dynamic. Even Hamas and Hezbollah have fallen silent, leaving Iran as Syria’s only true ally.

The days ahead may be bloody, the struggle prolonged. But there is hope, at long last, for the dawn of democracy and the toppling of the tyrant.

August 7th, 2011, 8:57 am

 

Aboud said:

Hilarious new cartoon series, staring Besho 🙂 🙂 🙂

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCRg4orLmd4&feature=player_detailpage

Syrians always were a creative bunch 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 8:58 am

 

ss said:

SGID 261
“i have many reasons, but the most basic right is freedom of opinion, give us that right and all good will come along”.

I vote with you brother. I want freedom of opinion not freedom of destruction. The goverment is very serious about the reform and they admitted making mistakes in the past. The goverment is openning its doors to leaders in the oppositions to come forward and start the reform process. The opposition is fragmented, disorganized, and lacks leadership. You cannot negotiate with smoke, you need real people to come forward and start the process. I would say the freedom of expression is the least tthing the goverment should offer. I would add we want job opportunities for the college graduates, we wants homes for the youth who will die before they can afford a home in Damascus, we want better salaries, multi parties and new blood to participate in the political life of Syria. On the other hand, I am against KIFA7 MOSALA7 by MBs, terrorists, and armed gangs. For that we ask the army to kill or capture any terrorists. Unfortunately innocent people will be lost, but to make the case that the army is randomly killing and shooting people is a big lie. We should have had 100.000 people dead by now if the army has been shooting randomly. God bless the security and the army men and bring them victory as they control Deer Al Zoor.

August 7th, 2011, 9:05 am

 

beaware said:

Iran’s lawmakers must have masters degree
http://newsleaks.in/iran%E2%80%99s-lawmakers-must-have-masters-degree/
All candidates running for Iran’s parliament must have postgraduate degrees in future, the Guardian Council’s spokesman, Abbasali Kadkhodai, was quoted as saying by the semi-official Fars news agency.

The new law has already been approved by the Iranian parliament and is aimed at improving the quality of the country’s lawmakers, he said.

more….

August 7th, 2011, 9:09 am

 

Aboud said:

“You cannot negotiate with smoke,”

Funny, smoke is all that the regime has offered in the way of reforms. France called the latest ones “insulting”. Not even the GCC called them serious.

“would add we want job opportunities for the college graduates, we wants homes for the youth who will die before they can afford a home in Damascus”

Eleven years and junior has failed to deliver on each and everyone of those points. Time for him to go, and give the job to someone who wasn’t handed it on a silver platter.

“On the other hand, I am against KIFA7 MOSALA7”

Yes, you are against all forms of armed resistance, except when the arms are in your hands and the other side are not resisting. I dare you to tell me, out of the 1,600 who were killed, who among them were MB or Iraqi Jihadist militants.

“Unfortunately innocent people will be lost”

Then you wouldn’t mind coming back to Syria with your family and putting your lives on the line, would you? I find it hypocritical in the extreme that someone can be so casual about lost lives while living far away from events.

“We should have had 100.000 people dead by now if the army has been shooting randomly”

News of the events in Hama ’82 took a month to get to the rest of the world. Junior is killing and arresting as many people as his sycophants tell him he can get away with. But even Russia can’t stomach his atrocities anymore.

“The opposition is fragmented, disorganized, and lacks leadership. ”

Why is Najati Tayara in jail?

August 7th, 2011, 9:17 am

 

beaware said:

Shaaban: Turkey Will Hear Stronger Statements from us When its FM Visits Damascus
http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/12199-shaaban-turkey-will-hear-stronger-statements-from-us-when-its-fm-visits-damascus
Syrian President Bashar Assad’s advisor Buthaina Shaaban criticized on Sunday’s Turkey’s position on the developments in Syria, saying that its Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu will hear “stronger statements when he visits Syria.”

She said in a statement: “If the Turkish foreign minister believes that he is arriving in Syria to deliver a firm message, then he will hear a firmer message from us.”

She slammed Turkey’s stand on the unrest in Syria, noting that it “hasn’t even condemned the brutal crimes against the civilians, security forces, and army.”

Over the weekend, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced that his country’s patience over the regime crackdown against protestors has ended, adding that Davutoglu will visit the Arab country on Tuesday to deliver a “firm message.”

August 7th, 2011, 9:22 am

 

Sheila said:

To #229. Aus4Syria,

If you go through previous postings on SC, you will see the answer to your questions that you are raising in 229. Many of us have addressed the issue of negotiations before. Here it is again:

The opposition is not negotiating because:
1- There is no trust with the regime. Most opposition leaders are either killed, in jail, in hiding, just been released from jail or are outside the country for fear of being killed or jailed. Any one can provide names: Almaleh, albounni, zeitoun, Alattasi, Seif, Dalileh and the list goes on.
2- There is no hope with this regime. All these new laws and changes are not translated on the ground. The Emergency Law was removed while many were still being arrested without due process.
3- There is no conviction that this regime is willing or able to change and reform. If the president wants to reform, the first thing he needs to tackle is corruption, so who does he prosecute? his brother? his uncles? his cousins? or himself?

I hope this answers your question. I would also like to commend you for trying to see the other side’s point of view.

August 7th, 2011, 9:22 am

 

hsyrian said:

About another claim from our Ntrepid Muslim Brother
“”””
And how long can a back up generator last for? Are you seriously claiming it can last a week to power an entire hospital?
“”””

A backup generator is essentially built around a diesel motor .
It will run as long there is still diesel fuel in its fuel tank.
As you can refill the fuel tank anytime , therefore it will last forever !!

Disclaimers
You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink.
You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.

August 7th, 2011, 9:25 am

 

beaware said:

Syrian forces arrest opposition leader Bunni -group
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/world/9987726/syrian-forces-arrest-opposition-leader-bunni-group/
AMMAN (Reuters) – Syrian forces arrested on Saturday a veteran opposition leader who had called for a national conference to seek a peaceful transition of power after a five-month uprising against President Bashar al-Assad’s rule, a rights group said.

Walid al-Bunni, who has been in hiding, was seized with his sons, 19-year Moayad and 18-year Iyad, by secret police in his hometown of Tel, north of the capital Damascus, the Syrian Human Rights Organisation Sawasiah said in a statement.

A day before his arrest, Bunni told Reuters the uprising must remain peaceful, even as the death toll from a government crackdown rises.

“There will be more martyrs, but the protest movement must remain nonviolent,” he added. He urged rank-and-file soldiers, who he said had begun to defect from the military, not to take up arms against Assad’s forces.

“The best thing these conscripts can do is to go home. Using arms will give an excuse for Iran and Hezbollah and other outside parties to intervene,” Bunni said.
more….

August 7th, 2011, 9:26 am

 

Aboud said:

“It will run as long there is still diesel fuel in its fuel tank.”

Yeah, as long as there is diesel.

1) Water has been cut off

2) Snipers target anyone in the streets.

3) Tanks randomly shell residential buildings.

4) Impossible for people to get their bare necessities. They make do with whatever they have hoarded up in expectation of this invasion.

If you dispute any of the above, I dare Al-DUHnya and Syrian TV to show us normal life in Hama. We all know it *was* normal, and no one had been hurt, until junior sent in his disgraceful gang of khanazeer in.

August 7th, 2011, 9:39 am

 

Tara said:

Jad And Syau

Please spare me your sympathy towards Syrians who will be affected by the sanctions. I do support blocking oil and gas export. It will hasten the fall of the regime. I would’ve like to see Sympathy in regard to the 300 killed in Hama and the total 2000 killed in Syria. I would’ve like to see sympathy to the parents of the killed infants and children. Your sympathy is misplaced. These sanctions coming up after Deir al Zor invasion. Just wait.

August 7th, 2011, 9:45 am

 

Sheila said:

To Some Guy in Damascus,
Please ignore the ranting of some people on this blog. We all respect you and wish you the best. You are probably the only one here who is on the ground and backing his words with action. The rest of us can only talk. Please be careful. Please stay safe.
Alla yehmeek.

August 7th, 2011, 9:46 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

SS
You call freedom seekers ,you call them terrorist.it is the regime who is terrorist,the regime who is killing civilian, you are the supporter of such terrorist regime ,you are accomplice to terrorism,

August 7th, 2011, 9:53 am

 

Aboud said:

“You are probably the only one here who is on the ground and backing his words with action. ”

🙁

I’m in Homs…. *sulk*

August 7th, 2011, 9:58 am

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ ss
1) its good u called me brother instead of mb scum, this time.
2) as aboud has repeated a thousand times: why is najati tayara still in jail?
3) i still cant condemn rami makhlouf, and his venom on the economy( this is a huge problem with an easy solution, still not touched)
4) im telling you my personal account of a peaceful demonstration, and how it was dispersed. therefore the government has guaranteed theres no way to highlight the syrian population’s grievances, so there is no way to know what the problems are.
5) are you in syria or out?

August 7th, 2011, 9:59 am

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

HSYRIAN @ 264+m-n+l*

Someone should take these keyboards away from you guys, you keep shooting yourselves and your besho in the foots .

Disclaimers
Public Relation firms have something in common with Recycling Industry : they recycle garbage and make huge profits.

I guess recycling can only do so much with some garbage, could it be the smell of blood?

@ 45 now stable

Q: Does anyone know of any Syrian group in Boston ?
A: You should contact the Syrian embassy in your country and submit your project. We may be able to help you.
A: Buy an advertising page in your local newspaper

And, which embassy are your Excellency attached to as a security….oops cultural (how about horticultural) affairs officer, or are you simply a fan of pompous statements?

Also B comes after A.

——–
n: number of comments being moderated
m: number of comments to be rejected
l: number of comments duplicated or triplicated when not apearing promptly

August 7th, 2011, 10:04 am

 

newfolder said:

Sharif Shahade, regime spokesman on AlArabiya yesterday “we can provoke the Shia in the Gulf to rise up”. Sectarian threat by a sectarian regime

August 7th, 2011, 10:10 am

 

ss said:

295 majedkhaldoon

Just look at the secon video posted by JL. It speaks storries about the type of people conducting the revolution. The guy who is breaching Alah wa Akbar jihad leason to his fellows looks exactly like Bin Laden. I would ask visitors of this site to review video #2 on this post and they wil judge. Can you say a comment about this video?? Pehaps you may be able to explane the peaceful looks of these thugs

You have put a deadline that august 10 would be the fall of Assad. August 10 is around the corner.

I understand that Ramadan did not turn to be a win for you. Ineffective Jihad

August 7th, 2011, 10:12 am

 

Aboud said:

Hey menhebaks. Care to explain why the shabiha scum violently broke up a demonstration of *doctors* at the Aleppo University Hospital? What, are those doctors Salafis? Iraqi Jihadists? Just how much of the country, and how many social classes, are supposed to be part of this Salafi movement?

You can’t answer that, can you?

“You have put a deadline that august 10 would be the fall of Assad. August 10 is around the corner. ”

Incorrect. Dale Andersen came up with that arbitrary deadline (and he hates everyone, like some White Supremacist militia). Kindly pay more attention to the posts if you are going to take part in a discussion.

The menhebaks are the kind of people who would called the space program a failure, because NASA failed to land a man on the moon *a week after President Kennedy said they would try to*

They think there is some cut off date for the revolution. There isn’t, it will go on as long as it has to. If junior was going to subdue it, he would have been able to.

I really believe now that whoever is advising him, secretly wants his downfall.

August 7th, 2011, 10:13 am

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

Errata: Comment 294+m-n+l

m: number of comments being moderated
n: number of comments to be rejected
l: number of comments duplicated or triplicated when not apearing promptly

August 7th, 2011, 10:16 am

 

Sheila said:

To #290. hsyrian,
I just wanted to let you know that there is a big shortage of oil products in Syria. There are long lines in front of gas stations. Diesel is also in short supply.

August 7th, 2011, 10:22 am

 

Tara said:

Newfolder@299

I urge all readers to open your link to see how this pathetic regime use the Shiaa. Shiaa to this regime is not more than a tool to apply political pressure. The regime turned blind eye on Shiaa oppression in Bahrain so KSA turns a blind eye on our oppression.

August 7th, 2011, 10:24 am

 

ss said:

293# Tara;

“I would’ve like to see Sympathy in regard to 300 killed in Hama and the total 2000 killed in Syria. I would’ve like to see sympathy to the parents of the killed infants and children. Your sympathy is misplaced. These sanctions coming up after Deir al Zor invasion. Just wait”

Fisrt; I have to reply this despite your statement in a previous post “I am not interested”. Well I am not asking your hand in the first place. I want to challenge your posts who are filled with lie and fabrications of fatcs.

Are you adding up the security men who were killed by your thugs to the total number of 2000? Would you admit the killing of these men? It would be better to say 1300 syrian people were killed in addition to 700 army men trying to protect us from evil.

Your support of sanctions means millions of Syrians will suffer while you have your English tead every morning. I cannot believe someone who feels sympathy for the syrian people is asking the international community to place sanctions on them. Anyway sanctions proved to be ineffective. Syria survived the worst sanctions in the 1980s where getting a lebanese tissue box was considered the best gift. Sanctions are ineffective

Ramadan is not going well with you. Empty people like yourself who wait for a fabricated video deserve nothing but crush. I hope the next stage would be Homs, then Alepp, then Lattakia, then tartus, then every single city in Syria. We should not give any space for jihadist to operate. Do not worry I am sure your fellows are fabricating some fake videos so the business may flowrish again. Dont lose hope

August 7th, 2011, 10:25 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Aboud, no use arguing with these baby killers.

Good luck to them if they think they can subdue Deir.

About “Salafis” :

We are just conservative Muslims whose theology varies from the “traditional” Sunni Hanafis or Shafi’is. We are another sect or school of though within Sunni Islam –

1. We don’t read Al Fatiha for the dead

2. We don’t visit the shrines and tombs of saints or ancestors or celebrate their ‘Urs

3.We don’t recognize the 15th of Sha’abaan

4. We don’t believe in Wahdat al-Wujood or Tasawwuf

5. We don’t celebrate Eid of the Mawlid al-Nabi

6. We don’t do these things because we regard them as “Bid’ah”

7. We only regard the Sahih Ahadeeth and reject the daeef (weak).

8. We DON’T believe in Takfir of any sect, we don’t declare ‘Alawi to be non-Muslims.

We have NOTHING to do with politically motivated Islamist movements such as Muslim Brotherhood.

August 7th, 2011, 10:27 am

 

Sheila said:

To my dear Aboud @296,
I am really sorry. I had no idea that you are currently in Homs. Now I understand all the rage. I guess, I would be swearing and cursing if I were there too. However, I still urge you to control your langauge.
I hope you and your family are safe. What Homs went through and is still going through is unbelievable.
Alla yehmeek.

August 7th, 2011, 10:36 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Dr. Abu Ghassan –

You are either with us, or you are with the regime.

Btw, what makes you trust the bearded Ayatollahs any more than the MB-radicals ?

August 7th, 2011, 10:39 am

 

Aboud said:

“It would be better to say 1300 syrian people were killed in addition to 700 army men trying to protect us from evil.”

Incorrect. Over 2000 civilians have been killed. Once more, I demand that you, as a supporter of the regime who killed them, provide a breakdown on who amongst them was an Iraqi Jihadist.

“Your support of sanctions means millions of Syrians will suffer while you have your English tead every morning”

English tead? Tara, is that some delicious new drink you are keeping from the rest of us? And you are so worried about millions of Syrians suffering? What about this nugget then;

“I hope the next stage would be Homs, then Alepp, then Lattakia, then tartus, then every single city in Syria.”

Your own words alone are enough to hang you. And Homs? How many times has the army tried to subdue Homs? I can’t count the number of security sweeps and blockades that have been imposed here. How’s that working out for you? Not too well.

“Syria survived the worst sanctions in the 1980s where getting a lebanese tissue box was considered the best gift. ”

Says the guy who wont have to live under sanctions, living as he does in the West.

“Empty people like yourself who wait for a fabricated video deserve nothing but crush”

Man, no one drinks Crush here anymore. We like Pepsi. Or English Tead ROFL!

“are filled with lie and fabrications of fatcs.”

*facepalm* Yes, I fabricate “fatcs”. But I’m honest in my *facts*

“so the business may flowrish again”

Is flowrish some sort of Baathist economic cycle, between flourish and “deteriorate so badly junior has to beg for ayatollah dollars”?

Hehehe, poor guy can’t deny making those mistakes now. LOL!

Sheila, I turned on junior after the New Clock demonstration in April was blatantly shot at. It was a demonstration as big as any that Hama hosted. But of course, all the menhebaks have to say about that day is “why are they praying in the streeeeeeeets wa wa wa”

I’m proud to say that nothing the regime has done has managed to subdue Homs in any shape, way or form.

August 7th, 2011, 10:42 am

 

syau said:

A report by Syria tv showing footage of the weapons seized by boarder control on the Dabousieh boarder between Lebanon and Homs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSPMwhJcQoA

On another note, the bodies of 13 security personnel slaughtered by the terrorists in Hama were discovered in the Assi river, Hama yesterday by army personnel as reported by Syria news.

August 7th, 2011, 10:44 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Shiela
Pony tail is in Homs,Wisconson.

August 7th, 2011, 10:46 am

 

syau said:

Tara #293,

The DEPLOYMENT of troops to Deir Alzour is to clear the province of the terrorists unleashing their terror, murders and insurgencies. God protect the Syrian army in its efforts of eradicating all terrorists and armed gangs and protecting the Syrian people from such filth, therefore regaining stability in the area.

What would be the position of Obama if insurgencies were undertaken in Texas or California or New York etc, on government buildings and infrastructure, or if gangs were taking up arms and terrorising citizens?
What would be Obama’s, or any other presidents position if there were terrorists murdering and mutilating people in the streets while others watched, whistling and chanting when such a horrific act was unfolding right in front of their eyes?
What would be their position if some the countries security personnel were massacred, others slaughtered and bodies dumped into a river?

I don’t think it would be a laid back response; rather they would have every available security apparatus deployed to control the situation and regain order.

August 7th, 2011, 10:49 am

 

Joshua said:

Dear all,

Comments are going to the spam filter and must be released periodically, leading to some being released a few times.

We are trying to fix this. Not sure why.

Please let’s stop insults – even the work “scum” which has become the favorite because it hasn’t caused moderation. Please be civil even to those who enrage you.

Syria Comment aims to provide new content and provide a forum where Syrians can try out their ideas and influence each other through debate. More people will comment the more civilized and content rich the comment section is.

Thanks, Joshua

August 7th, 2011, 10:53 am

 

newfolder said:

the “glorious” Syrian army in Dier Ezzour wreaking people’s cars … or do the terrorist gangs have tanks and apc’s too??

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihentZytUCM

the artillery around Dier Ezzour being used to pound the city:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q66xw7pUk_g

seriously, you need artillery to combat armed Salafi gangs now?

August 7th, 2011, 10:55 am

 

Aboud said:

“Pony tail is in Homs,Wisconson. ”

It’s spelled Wisconsin. Now the Baathists are making up states 🙂

I like my pony tail. I fling it around and a menhebak gets banned.

“Comments are going to the spam filter and must be released periodically, leading to some being released a few times.”

Sorry, I’ve been re-posting some of my comments, with slight changes. But there is a noticeable delay in some comments getting posted.

August 7th, 2011, 11:00 am

 
 

Tara said:

SS

Just read my name. Did not read your post. Give up. I have no interest in carrying a conversation with you. Not because you are a regime supporter. I very much appreciated some regime supporters in the past. I look for substance, intelligence, integrity, and style. I can’t stand slavery of thoughts or religious convictions. I can’t stand intolerance and I can’t stand hatred, and on top of all, I really can not stand lack of style. Style is very important for Tara too.

All your posts convey 3 concepts: anti regime are MBs, Bashar is great, and hooray to the army killing civilians. Your thoughts appear as religious convictions. There is nothing else in your posts otherwise. They do not offer a political opinion, a personal emotion, or a stand on any issue. Just 3 repetitive ideas.

Some people can deal with your convictions. Tara is not interested. Do you get it now?

August 7th, 2011, 11:03 am

 

Mango said:

Russia has warned the USA and EU about inadmissibility of arms supplies of the Syrian opposition under the Libyan scenario and has opposed UN Security Council interventions in situation development in Syria.

Probably some one has a bad situation with hearing!!!!

August 7th, 2011, 11:08 am

 

Sheila said:

# 305 SS,
I am baffled by your posts. Sometimes you seem like a coherent person who has the best interest of Syria ta heart and some other times you seem like a blood thirsty maniac who wants everybody who does not agree with him, dead. You worry about the sanctions hurting the poor, but you want the army to go into all cities and “clear” the mess. I just do not get it.
I want to assure you that I am not a Muslim Brotherhood member, nor am I a supporter or sympathizer. I am a liberal sunni muslim which ranks me as the worst enemy of the Muslim Brotherhood members. I have also lived through the MB uprising in Syria in the late 70s early 80s. I was 14 and lived in one of the hottest spots, Aleppo. I remember everything clearly. I want to inform you that the people in general, did nto support the indisriminate killings perpetrated by the MBs. I personally knew some of the killed Alawiis, who were killed just because they were Alawiis. It was an outrage. The “madfaiyeh” school killings was a case in point. 34 young men were killed, again, just because they were Alawii. I can assure you again that the only sympathy people of Aleppo had for the MBs was for the shere fact that they were able to stand up to the regime. Absolutely not for the tactics used and the indiscriminate killings. The regime of Hafez Alassad back then was absolutely horrible. Corruption was rampant and his brothers and nephews (not his children) were reaking havoc on the country. They had free hand in Syria. They kidnapped girls, some of which were from their own communities (I personally know the parents of one unfortunate girl who was a Alawii, who ended up raped, killed, wraped in a carpet an thrown in front of the military hospital in Lattaqia).
You are admitting that Syria has problems in some of your posts, so why are you denying the Syrians the right to express their discontent with their government?. You want dialogue. We all do, but this regime it not allowing real dialogue to take place.
Lastely, these are our people, whether it is an army conscript, a mukhabarat, or a civilian. We mourn them all and we are upset about their death.

August 7th, 2011, 11:08 am

 

friend in America said:

Nour @ 42

I know some. Joshua has my permission to tell you how to contact me.

August 7th, 2011, 11:12 am

 

Aboud said:

In the keeping with the spirit of Joshua’s instructions, let’s make a fresh start. Ahem.

My dearest menhebaks (which you proudly claim to be, that can’t be construed as an insult), as you are the only ones who seem to understand the regime’s strategy (if we can dignify their blunderings with such a word), please enlighten us as to the following;

1) What percentage of the 2000 Syrian civilians murdered by the security forces, were in armed revolt, or had Iraqi-Jihadist/Salafi ties?

2) Why is it that not even Russia nor the GCC have been satisfied with junior’s so called “reforms”? In fact, the only ones that seem to be satisfied with them are menhebaks living abroad, and who won’t have to live under these “reforms”. Is junior so inept that he can’t even convince his closest allies about his sincerity?

3) Why is Najati Tayara in a jail, being beaten, tortured and denied his basic rights?

4) When will junior send tanks against the Arab league, that just told him to put a leash on his dogs.

5) Let us discuss Atef Najib. The ICG report (which apparently none of the menhebaks have read…I understand, it’s quite long, and not flattering to junior) described him as so incompetent that he was sent to Dar’a where the regime thought he couldn’t possibly do much harm

Why hasn’t Atef Najeb been punished?

How much trust should we have in a regime that sent such an inept imbecile to a hotspot like Dar’a. Or maybe, by the standards of the Baathists, Atef Najeb is the most competent and talented officer available to them?

August 7th, 2011, 11:13 am

 

Mango said:

Russia – רוס ‘ ה 200+6+60+10+5 = 281
Syria – סור ‘ ה 60+6+200+10+5 = 281

August 7th, 2011, 11:19 am

 

mjabali said:

Madame Sheila Comment # 215

It is wonderful that you denounce the views of Ibn Taymiyah’s regarding the Alawis. But, your humane attitude should be that of the majority of Sunnis who till this day deny the basic right of Alawis to exist. Until the Sunni establishment in the Muslim World come out and say that Ibn Taymiyah was not right in what he said, your humane feelings towards others are going to be not noticed unfortunately.

August 7th, 2011, 11:22 am

 

Sheila said:

Aboud,
Are you pulling my leg? Are you really in Wisconsin?

August 7th, 2011, 11:26 am

 

Aboud said:

No Sheila, I’m in Homs, Syria.

The Baathists can’t seem to agree where I am. First they claimed I was in Tripoli, Lebanon. Then Tel Aviv. Then the USA. The Baathists could have at least picked a state *they knew how to spell* LOL!

Sometime ago there was a Baathist here who pretended to be a Christian in Homs. In all innocence (hehehe), I asked him a simple question about a classifieds weekly newspaper in Homs. We never heard from him again 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 11:30 am

 

Abu Umar said:

Why do the cyber-shabiha expect people to go to their graves like sheep? If the shoe was on the other foot, would you be saying the same thing?

August 7th, 2011, 11:30 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Aboud, are you really in Homs ? Aren’t the Mukhabarat tracking your IP ? Are you safe ? or are the Mukhabarat not that competent ?

And what is the situation in Baba ‘Amr ?

August 7th, 2011, 11:33 am

 

beaware said:

Syria expresses dismay over Gulf council’s statement
2011-08-07
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-08/07/c_131034448.htm
DAMASCUS, Aug. 7 (Xinhua) — A source in Syrian Foreign Ministry expressed Sunday dismay over the statement issued a day earlier by the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council calling for an immediate end of the violence and for a prompt implementation of reforms in Syria.

In a statement faxed to Xinhua, the foreign ministry source said the GCC statement has “entirely disregarded facts presented by Syria, both in terms of slaughter and sabotage acts perpetrated by armed groups that target Syria’s security and sovereignty, or in terms of the package of significant reforms announced by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad” in a speech he made on June 20.

The statement said the Syrian president has underscored, in his speech, the importance of national dialogue as the best solution to the current crisis. But, it added, the “negative” stand showed by the Syrian opposition, in addition to the continued acts of killing and sabotaging, “haven’t prevented the Syrian leadership from working” to put the announced reforms into force.

It said breaking the current cycle of violence requires a call from “our Arab brothers in the GCC to stop all acts of vandalism, denounce armed violence carried out by groups that don’t want welfare for Syria, and give the necessary time for the presented reforms to yield fruits.”

The statement urged the Gulf leaders to reconsider their stands “taking into consideration what the Syrian leadership is doing to bypass the current crisis.”

The Gulf Cooperation Council expressed on Saturday its utmost concern over “the excessive use of force” in Syria, the six-member bloc said in a statement.

The bloc, grouping Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the UAE, Oman, Qatar and Bahrain, called for an end to “bloodshed” in Syria, which has been sweeping by pro-democracy protests since March.

The statement came one day after the U.S., French and German leaders vowed to mull over fresh punitive steps on Syria.

Meanwhile, Syrian president’s adviser for political and media affairs, Bouthayna Shaaban, said Sunday that if the Turkish foreign minister is visiting Syria to deliver a “firm message” to Syria, “he would hear stronger words.”

Quoted by Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA), Shaaban censured the Turkish stance for failing so far “to condemn the atrocities committed against civilians, militants and policemen” in Syria.

The Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose country maintains close relations with Syria, said Sunday that Turkey’s patience is running out because of the Syrian leadership’s shelling of civilians. Turkey announces that it’s sending its foreign minister to Syria on Tuesday with a “firm message” from the Turkish leadership.

According to activists, the nearly five-month-old unrest has claimed the lives of more than 1,700 civilians, however Syria disputes the toll, blaming the unrest on armed groups and extremists that aim at toppling the regime to establish an Islamic emirate instead, and pledged that there would be no letup in its crackdown on those gunmen to restore stability and security to the country.

August 7th, 2011, 11:34 am

 

beaware said:

Arab League calls on Syria to stop violence, security raids
8/7/2011 5:55:00 PM

http://www.kuna.net.kw/NewsAgenciesPublicSite/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=2183929&Language=en

CAIRO, Aug 7 (KUNA) — Arab League Secretary General Nabil Al-Arabi called Sunday on Syrian authorities to put a stop to its acts of violence and security raids on its own people, and to take necessary measures to maintain national unity and protect civilians.
“There is still an opportunity for President Bashar Al-Assad to respond to the will of the Syrian people and their legitimate demands of freedom, change and political reform,” Al-Arabi said in a press statement.
The Arab League chief expressed increasing anxiety and extreme disdain at the collapse of security in Syria as a result of the heightened military operations and violence in Hama, Deir Al-Zour and other parts of the country, which have led to the death of dozens of civilians and the destruction of many publically and privately-owned buildings.
“The Arab League charter rejects foreign interference in Arab affairs, and ensures the safety and security, and political stability of its member countries,” he stressed.
He also urged Syrian authorities to work towards a comprehensive national dialogue, noting the Arab League keenness to support such a task.
“This is the only solution, which outlines a peaceful transition to a stage of stability that paves the way for a program of political reform,” he added.
Al-Arabi also called on the Syrian government to form an independent legal team, to investigate the violent happenings and “breaches of human rights”.

August 7th, 2011, 11:56 am

 

Tara said:

I was invited to a large gathering last evening.  Mostly Syrians but some Jordanians and Palestinians.  Emotions ran high.  Women were more revolutionary than men and they dominated the discussion.  Men were more “composed” for lack of a better word.  I attribute this to the human toll of this revolution including women and children.  Women’ involvement appears to be a trend in this revolution.  Women appear more vocal than men at least in the fabric of the Syrian society that is not demonstrating in the street.  All of them boycotting Syrian drama.  All of them spending few hours a day supporting the revolution one way or the other, And All of them are very much hurt by HA and Lebanese HA fighters killing Syrians.  The brutal killing of 2000, the invasion of Hama and Dair a Zor came as no surprise to all.  After all, like the father, like the son.  A father who killed 20.000 to 30.000 in Hama in 1982 can easily produce a son capable of the same.  But what was apparent to me how surprised these women where with HA material support of the regime.  They are suddenly finding themselves giving up a long standing history of infatuation/love with HA.  Hassan Nasrallah 2 martyr sons were brought up.  How on earth could he have done that betraying his own sons. 

Tara still look here and there for evidence otherwise for lack of HA involvement.  But she is also losing hope.         

August 7th, 2011, 12:00 pm

 

jad said:

Newfolder
“we can provoke the Shia in the Gulf to rise up”
When translating translate right not your own words, he didn’t say ‘PROVOKE’ he said ‘SUPPORT’.
He said that Syria do support the gulf states in all what they do and then he said that Syria can SUPPORT the Shia in the gulf states if needed but the national ideology of the leadership of Syria prevent them from doing that (Support), meaning, unlike the radical Gulf states where they ‘PROVOKE’, finance and send arms to the radical elements of Syria to kill other Syrian infidels…..nothing about PROVOKING as you claim.

Tara,
Playing high morals needs to be convincing, supporting violence and impoverishing all Syrians because they disagree with your views doesn’t work, spare me your fake high morals charade it’s getting old.

“Women were more revolutionary than men and they dominated the discussion. ”
We can see that from you and Aboud comments.

August 7th, 2011, 12:00 pm

 

majedkhaldoon said:

What can Turkey do?
They can block the border and strengthen the sanction against Syria,this will expedite the collapse of the economy,which will cause more people to demonstrate.and will turn the high class people split from the regime.
they can cut trade of goods,and stop financial relations.
They can block Iranian help to the regime.This will have effect but after long time, and it will hurt HA.
they can put a lot of pressure diplomatically on Syria.diplomatic posturing can lead to military posturing,that leads to military action.
Turkey can use the refugee issue to create buffer zones, they did it against Saddam in 1991 easily.this can leads to bengazi style revolt.
Media control and media war(escalations) can increase anger among assadist.it will increase Erdogan popularity among syrians.and could weaken Iran.Media war can embarasse Arabic countries,as they stay quiet while crimes by the regime are commited against the people of Syria, Arabic counties are staying quiet now, it is a shame, but they have to talk against Bashar Assad if turkey escalate rhetoric.
they can assist protesters financially and supply them with arms.
Military action is unlikely since it may backfire,and let us not forget that Turkey is part of NATO, and involving NATO could leads to wider wars, I am against military action by Turkey.if it becomes reality,it has to be fast.to get involved in long war of atrition it is a major mistake, better not do it.

August 7th, 2011, 12:06 pm

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Even when Homs had no electricity ,pony tail was posting 24 hours a day using his (edited, please read JL post. “Scum” is not to be used on this forum)
And f..and kazook manners,do you know how?
He was converting falafel oil into electricity,being Homsian,and he was sending his comments using 4G network which was working all over Homs,when mukabarat and shabiha will run after him,he Jumps over trees and keep posting while he sticks his tongue to the scum shabiha below the tree,then he jumps to another tree.He is all over Homs,he even climbs buildings like superman,he has his I phone and he posts from building roofs.his phone camera has not been working that is why he has not been able to get us any vidio clip yet,but he will,when his camera is fixed.
Pony tail lies and manners are perfect reflection of this Syrian destruction movement.

August 7th, 2011, 12:12 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Mr khaled ,
George w.bush after 911 said : you are either with us or with the terrorists . Look at the the results if this retarded approach. I made my position on the regime clear a long time ago and nothing will change that position ,however, I am only one voice and since I have not lived in Syria for the last 20 years I will have to say that my opinion is less valuable than those who live and suffer in Syria. Asking me to turn a blind eye to crimes committed in the name of fighting the regime will fall on deaf ears, nobody owns the whole truth. There is a reason god gave us two eyes and two ears.Bashar is one person and his political life is coming to an end, we better learn how to talk to each other and compromise..I look forward to the day when this regime is gone and our Syrian brothers and sisters leave in peace without fear..

August 7th, 2011, 12:16 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

I have no burning desire to convince you of anything. The revolution high moral ground is apparent to the world. A “leader” that kills his own people is the lowest of the lowest. This has already been judged by the world and by history. Your opinion and mine in judging morality do not really matter. The jury is out already.

The sycophant statement was a threat to the gulf states in regard to their condemning violence. Another display of the sectarian nature of this hateful regime. In essence, the regime is saying do not pressure us otherwise we will play the shiaa card. This deserves nothing but contempt.

August 7th, 2011, 12:18 pm

 

jad said:

الطائفية
بين الإسلاميين والنظام الحاكم في سوريا (الجزء 1)
د. عمار قط
لعل أهم مرتكزات التغلل العثماني بين صفوف العرب واختراقها في العمق كانت الطائفية، إذ ضمر العثمانيون حقدا تاريخيا على الدولة الحمدانية التي هرعت أنئذ لإنقاذ الخلافة العربية العباسية من براثن العثمانيين المتربصين. وما كان للعثمانيين مع حلولهم في سوريا إلا التحريض على سفك دم الشيعة وخاصة في حلب حيث كانت سابقا مركز الدولة الحمدانية. واستمر حكم العثمانيين في بلاد العرب (400 عام) باستخدام السيف والبطش والطائفية. ثم حكم الفرنسيون (26 عاما) من خلال استخدام الزعامات العشائرية ومراعاة مصالحها الشخصية واستمرت العلاقات الوثيقة المذكورة حتى يومنا هذا غير أن الفرنسيين اعتمدوا أيضا عملية صناعة نخبة من المسيحيين “الكاثوليك” وتعليمهم وتسليمهم مناصب مفتاحية في إدارة الدولة واقتصادها وخاصة البنوك.
وعندما انقلب حزب البعث واستلم زمام الحكم في سوريا استعاد التجربة التاريخية للبلاد مستفيدا من دروسها وعبرها. وتوصل إلى تشكيل قيادة تضم ممثلين عن معظم الطوائف والعشائر الريادية. ثم قام حافظ الأسد (وزير الدفاع) بالانقلاب على رفاقه وأجرى “تصحيحاته” على سياسة البعث، فحافظ على السياسة الشكلية لضمان منافع زعماء العشائر وتمثيل جميع الفئات الطائفية والمناطق الجغرافية، أما من الناحية الفعلية والجوهرية فقد اتجهت سياسة الأسد إلى فصل الطوائف والاعتماد على عناصر الطائفة العلوية البسطاء، الذين عانوا الكثير على مدى عقود طويلة من الفقر والعزلة وضعف اهتمام إدارات الدولة للخدمات والتنمية، هذه الطائفة التي يعود نسب الرئيس “الأسد الأب” إليها فقام بإعادة هيكلة الجيش وأجهزة المخابرات لتصبح علوية أو بأمرة علويين يخضعون بدورهم لأمرة الرئيس “حافظ الأسد” بشكل مباشر، أي أن خيوط تحريك جميع مراكز القوى في البلاد تركزت في يد واحدة على أساس الولاء الطائفي الشخصي. انطلاقا من أنه هو مخلص هؤلاء البسطاء من الظلم التاريخي الذي عانوا منه طويلا.
ثم أخذت دائرة تنوع عناصر النظام تضيق شيئا فشيئا لتنتقل من واقع طائفة إلى واقع حكم العائلة. وبما أن نشأة الأولاد جاءت مختلفة عن نشأة الآباء، فإن عائلة النظام الحاكم أو حكم العائلة لم يعد يتخذ العمق الطائفي ولا يمثل مصالح طائفة بقدر ما هو تبلور على شكل عصابة إجرامية حاكمة، ليس لديها أية قيم إنسانسة ولا انتماءات لا عشائرية ولا جغرافية. لكن بسطاء وفقراء الطائفة العلوية بقوا المجال الحيوي لصناعة أجهزة الحماية العسكرية والمخابراتية لأن النظام الذي أصبح مختزلا في عائلة هو بحاجة للخدم والحشم ولا أقرب من العلويين البسطاء الذين لم يقدم لهم النظام الذي يدّعي نسبهم! لم يقدم لهم طوال سنوات حكمه الأربعين لا الخدمات اللازمة التي تسمح لهم بزراعة واستثمار أراضيهم ولا سبل العيش الكريم. وبالتالي أصبح الحل الوحيد والمثالي بالنسبة لهم هو خدمة سادتهم من العائلة الحاكمة التي حرصت طوال الوقت على تربية ضعاف النفوس على الإخلاص الأعمى “الكلبي” للسادة.
عرش الأقليات
وجاءت أهم منجزات “الحركة التصحيحية” بتعميق الولاءات الضيقة على مستوى الطوائف والأقليات القومية والعشائر. ولم تكن إشاعة تعبير “فلان بيفك محكوم من على حبل المشنقة”، إلا تأكيدا على نظام الرضوخ المراتبي وتقسيم الشعب ضمن الطائفة الواحدة إلى الأدنى ثم الأدنى حتى القعر الأسفل. وبحكم الحياة الصعبة والمعقدة والمصائب التي جرى ممارستها على الناس، ونشهد أن ممارسة الرضوخ المراتبي لحل المشاكل قد تبدو للوهلة الأولى تافهة، لكن من يرفض الخضوع لهذا النظام تصبح مشاكله كبيرة وعضوية يتوارثها أفراد عائلته من بعده.
وانتشرت فكرة أن النظام الحاكم في سوريا أخذ على عاتقه حماية الأقليات الدينية والطائفية. وظن العامة البسطاء والفقراء أن هذا حقيقة! وقد جاءهم السند، أما الوسطاء على شكل “زعماء وعرابون” فقد راقت لهم العنجهية المصطنعة أمام فئات الشعب “الأدنى”، أما هم فيترتب عليهم بدورهم أن يؤدوا فروض الطاعة أمام أسيادهم. وبذلك تربعت العائلة الأسدية على عرش الطوائف مشكلة منظومة إجرامية تتمتع باعتراف دولي وبدعم عربي.
علوية سوريا وشيعة إيران وسنة تركيا
هذه تركيبة إسلامية طائفية لا يمكن لها التعايش أبدا. لأن “شيوخ”! الطائفة العلوية يتهمون الشيعة بخيانة الإمام علي كرم الله وجهه، و”فقهاء”! الشيعة يكفّرون العلويين لأنهم يؤلهون الإمام علي، فيما يتميز آيات الله في إيران بميزتين أساسيتين: من جهة أنهم شيعة يكفّرون العلويين ومن جهة أخرى هم يحقدون على العرب حقدا تاريخيا يدخل في تركيبتهم النفسية – التربوية يلمسها أي “عربي” زائر إلى بلادهم مهما كان هذا الإنسان بسيطا وحتى لو عرّف بنفسه على أنه ينتمي إلى ذات الطائفة “الشيعية”.
ويبدو أن للإيرانيين طموحات زعامة إقليمية يطمحون لتحقيقها عن طريق خلق تحالفات بمرتكزات مختلفة فليس هذا هو بيت القصيد، بل المهم بالنسبة لهم تحقيق تحالف يمكن من خلاله مساومة الغرب على حصص خاصة في القسمة العالمية. إذاً، فالحديث عن محور طائفي يضم سوريا وإيران، هو حديث مغلوط موضوعيا وتاريخيا. وكل ما في الأمر أن إيران تدفع مقابل تسهيلات التغلغل والنظام الحاكم في سوريا يقدم الخدمات ويقبض، بصرف النظر عمن يدفع وعن ماهية الخدمات، وسواء كانت الخدمات لإيران أم لتركيا أم للسعودية أم لإسرائيل.
أما “علماء”! السنة فهم يتعاملون مع الباقين إنطلاقا من مبدأ “نفي الآخر” حتى ولو ادعوا عكس ذلك. وتعمل آلتهم الدعائية بشكل واسع ومخيف إذ تقوم على خدمتهم شبكة إعلامية واسعة منها قنوات تلفزيونية فضائية تقوم على بث سمومها الفكرية بتصوير الثورة السورية من أجل الحرية ضد النظام الديكتاتوري الحاكم، وكأنها ثورة طائفة “أكثرية سنية” محكومة ضد طائفة “أقلية علوية” حاكمة. وذلك على لسان “علماء”! تدرك من الوهلة الأولى كم هم “جهلاء”. وقد تعجبت بالفعل أنه ما زال يوجد حتى يومنا هذا شيوخ مضلِّلون على غرار “العرعور”! ليس لديهم من الحجة سوى الدجل الذي يسيطرون بواسطته على البسطاء والفقراء المغلوب على أمرهم. ولو نظرنا بدقة لرأينا أن عدد الخدم والعبيد السنة الذين يستخدمهم النظام لا يقل عن عدد العبيد العلويين كما أن الأكراد ليسوا بعيدين عن هذه المعادلة كما هم باقي الأقليات.
ويتطابق الموقف “السني التركي” مع الموقف “الشيعي الإيراني”، الذي تجسد أخيرا في التعامل مع اللاجئين السوريين أهالي منطقة جسر الشغور الذين فروا من إرهاب قوات بطش النظام الحاكم في سوريا. وتبعا للموقف الرسمي المعلن من قبل القيادة التركية، فهم يقفون (بعد تذبذب وتردد) إلى جانب الشعب السوري وثورته. وبناء على ذلك استقبلت تركيا اللاجئين السوريين الذين ظنوا، ولسذاجتهم وبساطتهم، أن تركيا يمكن أن تمد يد العون حقا. إلا أن الأتراك وأجهزة أمنهم وعسكرهم نشأوا على كره العرب وعلى قمع العرب خاصة في منطقة “لواء اسكندرون” وهي أرض سورية سليبة. فكيف لهؤلاء أن يتعاملوا مع عرب سوريين لجأوا إليهم، سوى بالكراهية والحقد. والواقع أن هدف تركيا من كل هذه “الطبخة” أن تصوغ المبرر للتدخل الخارجي المباشر والعسكري، وهذا ما ترفضه الثورة قطعيا ودون أية مواربة. وترغب تركيا بذلك الحصول على حصة دسمة من “الطورطة” العالمية.
http://forum.rtarabic.com/entry.php?b=23804

August 7th, 2011, 12:27 pm

 

jad said:

الطائفية
بين الإسلاميين والنظام الحاكم في سوريا (الجزء 2)
د. عمار قط

خلطة إسلامية
يخضع السوريون، أسوة بإخوتهم في المنطقة العربية، إلى تطبيق مخطط صهيوني عالمي (عابر للقوميات والأديان) غاية في الخطورة. يطمح هذا المخطط إلى القضاء على الرابط القومي العربي بتقسيم المنطقة إلى كانتونات طائفية وأقليات قومية. جرى التمهيد إلى ذلك بإنشاء كيان افتراضي يدعى “دولة إسرائيل” عماد وجوده ديني وقاسمه المشترك القومي هو دين “اليهودية”! ويدفع هذا النموذج “القومي” لتفتيت الفكرة القومية الواقعية التي تنطلق من التاريخ المشترك والمصير المشترك واللغة المشتركة لتختزلها في فكرة “الدين المشترك”، الذي لا يشكل ولا في أي حال من الأحوال قاسم قومي مشترك. ثم لننتقل باسم الدين إلى تفريعات طائفية وهي الطامة الكبرى.
وتحتل مركز الريادة في العملية الإسلامية في المنطقة “جماعة الإخوان المسلمين” التي تتمتع برعاية غربية وأمريكية فائقة. وتتبع سياسة متلونة بما فيه الكفاية تضعها على طرفي النقيض دون حرج. فهي تستطيع أن تكون مؤيدة للثورة ضد النظام الحاكم ولا تجد حرجا في الحوار مع النظام ذاته، ويمكن أن تكون مسلحة! كما أن الجماعة تضم في صفوفها مجموعة كبيرة من الشخصيات المتعلمة والمثقفة تتحلى بالتوازن النفسي وقوة الحجة السياسية وموضوعية طرحها ومناقشتها للأمور. إلا أن الملفت للنظر هنا أن هذه الشخصيات التي نتكلم عنها تطرح آراء ثورية أكثر من الثورة وعلمانية حتى النخاع لكن طرحهم هذا لا يتجاوز الحديث الشخصي لأنهم عند التنفيذ، هم يلتزمون بأوامر قيادتهم التي يمكن أن تكون على نقيض ما يطرحون من آراء شخصية، وبالتالي فأنت تتعامل مع قوة سياسية هيولية لا يمكن التعويل عليها لا في السراء ولا في الضراء. خاصة، وأن التجربة في مصر أثبتت أنهم يتحينون الفرصة للقفز على منجزات الآخرين في الثورة.
أما “حزب الله” فخطره يكمن بادئ ذي بدئ أنه “لبس طربوشنا وجلس مكاننا”! وهذا ما مهد له النظام السوري وقام برعايته، انطلاقا من مبدأ “الغلبة لمن يدفع أكثر”. وتضمنت مهمات النظام السوري: دخول لبنان وضرب المقاومة الوطنية والفلسطينية والتزام الصمت والحياد تجاه أي اعتداء إسرائيلي بحجة “الالتزام بالاتفاقيات الدولية، والاحتفاظ بحق الرد”. ومع نهاية السبعينات وبداية الثمانينات ظهرت مجموعات من الحرس الثوري الإيراني في الوقت الذي كانت تسيطر فيه القوات العسكرية والأمنية السورية على كل مفاصل الحياة في لبنان وتم تهييء الظروف اللازمة لكي تتوضع قيادة حزب الله في بعلبك ومقرها على أعلى قمة في المنطقة ما أثار لدي تساؤلا أعتبره مشروعا وبحاجة إلى جواب صحيح: لماذا لم يقصف الطيران الإسرائيلي ولا مرة واحدة المقر المذكور رغم أنه وصل إلى أقصى شرق سوريا؟. وهكذا ظهر فصيل إيراني ضارب على الساحة اللبنانية بمعونة العراب السوري. يقول أنه يمثل “المقاومة الإسلامية (الشيعية) اللبنانية ضد (اليهود) في فلسطين” بعد أن دفع “خلواً” للنظام السوري. وليصبح هذا الحزب رأس الحربة الإيرانية في “صراعها”! مع إسرائيل من أجل حق العرب! والله إنها مفارقات، عسيرة على الهضم.
ولا يمكننا هنا إغفال الدور السعودي في وهبنة الإسلام (أي جعله وهابيا) عن طريق تمويل التيارات السلفية والتي تلقى مباركة من النظام الحاكم في سوريا أيضا، بسبب ما يجمعه من علاقات صداقة ومنفعة عميقة بالعائلة المالكة في العربية السعودية، والأموال التي يحصل عليها منهم. وتتجسد ضرورة رعاية التجمعات السلفية، رغم أن النظام لم ينجح في نشرها بين صفوف الشعب بالحجم الذي كانت تشغله جماعة الإخوان المسلمين سابقا، تتجسد في أن النظام الحاكم يستخدمها كورقة ضغط وتخويف سياسية على المعارضين المحتملين في السابق واليوم على الشارع المنتفض. لأن النظام السوري لا يجد مخرجا اليوم، مع تصاعد وتيرة الثورة، سوى إشعال فتيل الفتنة الطائفية والحرب الأهلية. ويجري هذا كما يلاحظ الجميع في ظل صمت عربي ودولي، وإن ظهرت إدانات دولية فهي خجولة جدا! ما يدل على تضامن صهيوني عالمي (عابر للأديان والقوميات) ضد الشعب الثائر من أجل الحرية والكرامة في سوريا.
لعل أكثر التنظيمات الإسلامية إثارة للشكوك على الساحة العربية في عملية الظهور والتشكل هي ما سمي بـ “حركة حماس”. هذه الحركة التي ظهرت من خارج السرب بعيدا عن الإخوان المسلمين والإيرانيين والسعوديين والغربيين أي بعيدا عن مجموعة الرعاة التقليديين للتنظيمات الإسلامية وبأشخاص “؟” نترك لذوي الشأن “الغزاويين” الحديث عنهم وعن تاريخهم ومنبتهم وأصولهم الاجتماعية والسياسية والنضالية. لكن الأهم فيما يعنينا هنا أن يقوم النظام الحاكم في سوريا بتبني هذا التنظيم ورعايته، علما أن النظام السوري ضرب من ضرب وأباد من أباد وفسّخ من فسّخ من التنظيمات الفلسطينية كما أن لديه تنظيماته الخاصة من الفلسطينيين. المثير في الأمر أن النظام الحاكم في سوريا يقبض أجرة رعاية التنظيمات الإسلامية والطائفية من الجهات التي ذكرناها، لكن من يدفع الحساب عن “حماس”؟!
حقاً، لدينا خلطة إسلامية طائفية في المنطقة ترعاها قوى دولية سياسية واقتصادية ورسمية محلية متمكنة وواسعة الحيلة تستخدم خبرة المخضرمين الصهاينة لتنفيذ خططها وصياغة خطط احتياطية لمواجهة حالات (ثورية) محتملة. يعلم الجميع أن هناك خطة الشرق الأوسط الكبير الذي يقسم منطقتنا إلى دويلات طائفية ودويلات أقليات قومية، تحكمها عصابات البلطجة الحاكمة منها وأخرى تتأهب لاستلام الحكم. وتتبع الدول المعنية السياسات الرسمية المكافئة للنهج المذكور. إلا أن ثورة الشعب جاءت صدمة من غير حساب في وجه جميع القوى المتآمرة، فلم يجدوا مخرجا سوى اتباع حرب إبادة ضد الشعب في محاولة أخيرة للبقاء.
http://forum.rtarabic.com/entry.php?b=23805

August 7th, 2011, 12:28 pm

 

jad said:

الطائفية
بين الإسلاميين والنظام الحاكم في سوريا (الجزء 3)
د. عمار قط

جرائم النظام بين الإعلام والصمت
فوّت النظام الحاكم في سوريا على نفسه حظوظ الدعاية الناجحة نتيجة سياسة الفساد والمحسوبيات والولاءات في تشكيل المؤسسات المحلية. فقد انعكس السحر على الساحر، وكشفت المؤسسة الإعلامية عن وجهها المتخلف والغبي والقميء، إذ كنا رأينا طلائعهم الذين صدّرهم النظام للعمل في مؤسسات أجنبية ناطقة بالعربية.
وتعكس المواد الفلمية والنصوص المركبة عليها أو المكتوبة في الصحافة، تزويرا وتلفيقا لوقائع لا تقنع حتى أبسط البسطاء وأكثر الناس سذاجة، خاصة وأن لشعبنا تجربة وباعا طويلين يدرك من خلالهما مآرب النظام ووقاحته في الإمعان بالكذب والاحتيال المعهودين في سياسته وممارساته. وينشط الشباب في مواجهة التزوير والتدليس السلطوي، لأننا نعيش في عصر المعلوماتية، والشباب السوري المثقف والمتعلم والوطني يدرك أهمية عمله الإعلامي ويقوم به على أكمل وجه.
ونأخذ على عاتقنا هنا، القول بأن القنوات التلفزيونية الفضائية مثل “الصفا” و”الوصال” والمقبلتين “الميادين” التي سيجري إطلاقها بأموال إيرانية وأخرى سيطلقها “علماء المسلمين”! إن هذه القنوات تقدم للنظام الحاكم في سوريا خدمات جلّى، لا يملك بنفسه إمكانيات تحقيقها. لأن الأحاديث تجري عبرها باستمرار عن الصراع (السني – الشيعي) بشكل رئيس وعن الصراع مع وبين باقي الطوائف أيضا. وهذه الأحاديث يمكن أن تخدم النظام الحاكم فقط، لأنها تبرر له إشعال فتيل الحرب الأهلية انطلاقا من الصراعات الطائفية الوهمية التي تقوم جميع القوى آنفة الذكر بالتأكيد عليها وهذا ما يصب في إطار المخطط الصهيوني العالمي (العابر للقوميات والأديان) والذي يشكل النظام السوري جزءا لا يتجزأ منه. ومن يسمع ويشاهد الشيخ العرعور، على سبيل المثال، يدرك مدى وحقيقة غيرتي على عقول أبناء بلدي وانتمائهم الوطني.
كما تقوم هذه المؤسسات بحفز الجريمة من خلال التضليل المركز والمستمر، وهذا الأسلوب ليس من الحنكة بمكان، ولكنه يستعمل بشكل أوتوماتيكي ويفعل فعله مع ضعاف العقول والنفوس والتجربة. وتظهر تشكيلات إجرامية قطيعية تتمتع بغطاء أمني رسمي ما يطلق العنان لممارساتها الوحشية دون حسيب ولا رقيب. وغاية النظام الحاكم من ذلك نشر الفوضى ليتمكن من الاصطياد في المياه العكرة، أي أنه يحاول خلق البلبلة في صفوف الثورة ليتمكن من معرفة المنسقين والمنظمين وبالتالي القضاء عليهم وتوجيه ضربة للثورة في العمق، وهذا ما لم ولن ينجح النظام في تحقيقه مهما فعل.
ويلعب صمت قسم من الشعب في مناطق مختلفة من الوطن، دور “الشريك” في الجريمة التي يرتكبها النظام. لأن الجميع يعلم في قرارة نفسه ومن خلال مسيرة حياة كل فرد على حدى، أن النظام الحاكم فاسد حتى النخاع وهو يبيع الشعب والوطن مقابل الامتيازات الشخصية. وأنا متأكد أن في الأمر تنفيذٌ لتعليمات الصهيونية العالمية (العابرة للقوميات والأديان) لأنهم جزء لا يتجزأ عنها. ويغدو الصمت ذلا وخنوعا، قد يعتاده قسم قليل من الناس لكن ليس الأغلبية.
وعي الشباب ووحدة الشعب
يرى المراقبون العالميون وخاصة “الصهاينة” منهم أن العرب بشكل عام والسوريون كجزء منهم، لا يمكن أن يصل بهم الوعي الحضاري إلى المستويات التي تعكس اليوم قدرات ثقافية وتنظيمية رفيعة المستوى لدى تنسيقيات الثورة. ويميل هؤلاء المراقبون إلى تصديق الروايات الرسمية التي ينشرها النظام الحاكم، على ألا يعترفوا بحقيقة الإدراك والوعي الذي تشكل لدى شباب بلادنا، نتيجة القفزة التقنية العالمية والتي لا يمكن منعها عن أحد مهما بلغ بعد هؤلاء الناس عن مراكز الحضارات المنتجة للتقنيات المذكورة. وإن ثورة المعلوماتية ويليها الأزمة العالمية هي التي لعبت الدور الحاسم في تشكيل العقلية الحضارية المتطورة وشكلت الظروف وإمكانيات التعبير والتنظيم الثوري لدى الشباب، وهذا ما يمكن أن يفهم به المؤثرات الخارجية. وليس كما يريد أن يصوره أعداء الثورة والتقدم بأن “المؤثرات الخارجية” هي مؤامرات على الصمود والممانعة وما شابه، وأن هؤلاء الثوار عملاء ينفذون أجندات خارجية وهم (مندسون وإرهابيون وسلفيون).
والواقع إن ثورة الشعب بقيادة الشباب ليست معنية بالهتافات التقليدية والممجوجة حول التحرير والنضال لأن تحقيق كل شيء مرهون بحرية الشعب. ولا يمكن عمل أي شيء في خدمة الشعب والوطن والمستقبل بدون “الحرية”، والسوريون يستحقون الحرية التي يدفعون ثمنها من دمائهم. إنها حقا تجربة عظيمة تعلم الناس روعة هذا الإنجاز (الحرية) وأهمية المحافظة عليه، وستكون درسا في الثورة والتحرر يشكل عبرة لجميع الأمم .
لقد أكدت الثورة السورية أنها ثورة كل الشعب ولم تتراجع عن شعار الشعب الواحد. وضحدت كل التلفيقات التي فبركتها أجهزة النظام الحاكم من أجل الإيقاع بالثورة. ويبدي الثوار وعيا متميزا في مواجهة المحاولات المستميتة من قبل زبانية نظام الإجرام لحرف الثورة عن سلميتها، إذ تظهر هذه التلفيقات والفبركات والإفتراءات على الثورة والثوار من خلال مواد فلمية يجري تسريبها ونشرها هنا وهناك لكنها مفضوحة لأنها من فعل أجهزة النظام الغبية التي استعرضنا سابقا مستوياتها العقلية والثقافية.
وتبقى مشاركة القسم الذي ينسب إلى الطائفة العلوية في صفوف الثورة خجولة، رغم أن موقع هؤلاء البسطاء والمثقفين الوطنيين في صفوف ثورة الشعب مع الشباب. وأعتقد أن القصور في المشاركة يحدث ليس نتيجة الرضى والقناعة بقدر ما هو الخوف من الانتقام عن طريق التهديدات التي يتم تبليغها بشكل شخصي.
ويبدو أن الأمر يأخذ عمقا حقيقيا في هذا المجال لأنني على معرفة شخصية بمجموعة كان موقفهم في البداية إيجابي بشأن الثورة وأهدافها، ومع تطور الثورة واتخاذها الطريق المباشر إلى النصر، ظهرت لديهم ميول ليست متحفظة وحسب بل واستفزازية وعدوانية، ما يدل على ضغوط مباشرة تمارس عليهم من قبل مجرمي النظام، والغرابة في أن معظم من أعرفهم يعتاشون من حساب نظام آخر.
المضطلعون على الوضع المعاشي والاجتماعي السوري يعرفون أن القرى في جبال العلويين لم تتلق دعما استثنائيا في عملية تنمية الريف السوري. إضافة إلى أن عملية التنمية ضعيفة بحد ذاتها، بل وعلى الأغلب كانت حصة قرى العلويين أقل من غيرها في باقي أنحاء الوطن. جرى ذلك عن سابق إصرار من النظام في سبيل تنمية الحقد الطائفي، وخلق المبررات والدوافع الذاتية لدى هؤلاء لقبول خدمة السادة من العائلة الحاكمة طائعين! هذه العائلة التي تقود اليوم تنظيما إجراميا يرتكب جرائم إبادة ضد المدنيين الآمنين.
ونتساءل اليوم، كم ستستغرق رحلة الإدراك عند العامة والبسطاء من الطائفة العلوية؟ وهل ستنضم إلى صفوف ثورة الشعب والشباب؟ أم ستفني حياتها في خدمة السادة من الأسرة الحاكمة انطلاقا من القناعة بالمقسوم وخوفا من العقاب؟ إلى متى سيستمر الناس بالإشارة إلى العلويين واتهامهم بجميع الموبقات؟ لماذا لا تندمج هذه الطائفة مع الشعب الواحد والثورة من أجل الحرية والكرامة؟ هل أصبحوا الصليب الذي سيحمله الشعب على ظهورهم كي يثبت هذا الشعب وحدته؟
http://forum.rtarabic.com/entry.php?b=23806

August 7th, 2011, 12:29 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Despite the dire situation in Syria,many of you kept their sense of humor. What is all that fuss about aboud’s real location? He says he is Homs
and that does not make me more likely or less likely to read his posts, I actually thought he is in the states and not in Syria,but I am mostly interested in the contents if his posts.
What is next after dair alzour? When the blood shed is coming to an end?

August 7th, 2011, 12:42 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Indiscriminate murdering of civilians all over the country.

If I own a gun and a thug is threatening the lives of my loved ones, what will my reaction be?

This regime is striving to turn this revolution into an armed ones.

Otherwise, there is no excuse for the amount of force they are using.

August 7th, 2011, 12:46 pm

 

Tara said:

Let’s not fool ourselves with the Arab league call or the gulf council’ statement. Benevolence did not strike these Arab governments all of the sudden. It is the American diplomacy at work. Security council to review Syria again in few days. Atrocities in Dair al Zor might be a turning point.

August 7th, 2011, 12:47 pm

 

Tara said:

What is next after Dair al Zor. I hope it is …..Damascus.

August 7th, 2011, 12:50 pm

 

Sheila said:

To #332. majedkhaldoon,
I agree with your assessment about Turkey and its role. Aleppo is a very strong card for Turkey to play. This is the second largest city in Syria with very strong ties to Turkey. As we jokingly say, half the grandmas in Aleppo are Turkish. Many Halabies speak Turkish, have family in Turkey and/or have business relations with Turkey. A buffer zone will most definately include Aleppo and Idleb because of their geographic proximity to Turkey. This is your Benghazi scenario at its best.

Regarding your earlier question about my background: I am from Aleppo, Born sunni muslim, two professional parents, lived in various countries in Europe as a child and later as an adult, speak several languages, have my basic degree from Syria and my masters from the US, currently live in the US, have been here for almost 20 years, married with children, own my own business and work like crazy. I hope this gives you an idea.

August 7th, 2011, 1:11 pm

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ Tara
they have lost all sense of humanity, and Damascus won’t stay quiet for long.

August 7th, 2011, 1:13 pm

 

Khalid Tlass said:

The Gulf Coucil is the most disgraceful thing in the Arab World….theur silecne is complicity. If they wanted they could have brought down some real pressure on the regime by cancelling the corporate glass-house investments in Damascus….their complicity is even more painful when the regime accuses us of being the Gulf Council and KSA’s “boys”. Well they are the “boys” of the sodomist Mullahs of Iran and Lebanon.

August 7th, 2011, 1:15 pm

 

Khalid Tlass said:

@ guy in Damascus –

Brother, are you safe from the Mukhabarat ? I’m really worried because of all ur online activity. Are you sure the baby killers cannot track your IP ? And what is the situation in Midan tonight ?

August 7th, 2011, 1:19 pm

 

atassi said:

US envoy vows to monitor Syria violence firsthand

7 August 2011
12:11
Agence France Presse
AFPR
English
Copyright Agence France-Presse, 2011 All reproduction and presentation rights reserved.
The US envoy to Syria has returned to monitor the “grotesque” crackdown there, placing himself on a collision course with Damascus, which has imposed strict constraints on diplomats.
Washington on Thursday sent Ambassador Robert Ford back to Syria, where President Bashar al-Assad’s troops and tanks have stormed major cities in an effort to suppress a months-long pro-democracy revolt.
Last month Ford infuriated the Syrian government with his visit to the flashpoint city of Hama, a major protest hub where scores of people have been killed in the past week in a massive military raid.
But in an interview with US broadcaster ABC, conducted before he left Washington and aired on Sunday, he vowed to continue traveling across Syria to observe the crackdown firsthand.
“I don’t particularly care (about angering Damascus), because we have to show our solidarity with peaceful protesters,” he told ABC’s Sunday political talk show “This Week.”
“I’d do it again tomorrow if I have to. I’m going to keep moving around the country. I can’t stop.”
It could be a dangerous mission. The violence rages on, with activists saying that Syrian forces backed by tanks killed more than 50 people on Sunday, as Assad defended the campaign as a battle against “outlaws.”
Ford said that while he was “personally very nervous about the fate of some of the people I met,” including some he feared are “either now under arrest or maybe dead,” he insisted on the need to travel outside the capital.
“My whole purpose in being in Syria is to be able to communicate not only with the Syrian government, but with the Syrian people,” he said.
“It’s important to bear witness to what the Syrian government is doing,” he said, adding that state-operated Syrian television “is not credible and tells all kinds of lies.”
Ford stopped short of calling for Assad to step down. The Obama administration has said the leader has lost all legitimacy to govern but has not directly called for his exit.
“We are going to try to ratchet up the pressure,” Ford said, calling the violence against the protesters “grotesque” and “abhorrent.”
Washington has been eyeing additional sanctions against Damascus, and on Friday the State Department urged US citizens in Syria to “depart immediately while commercial transportation is available.”
It also said “the Syrian government constraints on observers, including the short-term detention of accredited diplomats, have made it difficult for US embassy personnel to adequately assess the current risks or the potential for continuing violence.”

August 7th, 2011, 1:20 pm

 

SALAH ADDIN said:

ABUGHASSAN @339
You ask what next after Dair AlZor?
In very simple terms, from the President down to the lowest ranking officer in the Syrian Army, they all have taken an oath to protect Syria and the Syrian people. Protecting Syria and the Syrian people means going to every city and village if need be. Preserving law and order is paramount in preventing the descent into a lawless state where anarchy, chaos and the breakdown of the nation are what comes next. Syria is at a critical stage where, if the Army does not regain control and provides an atmosphere of law and order, then any reforms will be meaningless, in an out of control state, where people will be at the mercy of who controls the street by the force of arms.

August 7th, 2011, 1:27 pm

 

N.Z. said:

May God bless Ibrahim Kashoush, I wish he was still, physically, with us. His songs will stay with us forever. He will always be remembered as the voice of one of the most heroic revolutions history had ever known.

The response of Ms. Shaa’ban to the Turkish Foreign Minister, is an assurance that this regime is from a bygone era.

A Syria that is free from tyranny will sooner rather later be a reality.

August 7th, 2011, 1:27 pm

 

ss said:

317 by the classy Tara “All your posts convey 3 concepts: anti regime are MBs, Bashar is great and hooray to the army killing civilians”

What about your writings, what do they convey. You repeat the same menhebeck story again and again, you deny the army men killed on duty, you accuse the military of mass murdering people while the death toll so far is 2000, more than half of them are army men????Where is it that the army is mass killing people???.

Look at what you just wrote under #330; indeed classy:

“All of them are very much hurt by HA and Lebanese HA fighters killing Syrians. The brutal killing of 2000, the invasion of Hama and Dair a Zor came as no surprise to all. After all, like the father, like the son. A father who killed 20.000 to 30.000 in Hama in 1982 can easily produce a son capable of the same”. Do you believe that the Syrian army is asking for help. If the army wants to mass murder people then the death toll should be hundreds of thousands. You so not want to consider the death conducted by the thugs and armed criminals. Real classy people on your side did (Abo G) you probably have anything but class.

Shiela “Sometimes you seem like a coherent person who has the best interest of Syria ta heart and some other times you seem like a blood thirsty maniac”

So I am coherent if I say that the government had made mistakes in the past, because it support your cause, and I am manic person if I say the army should chase the terrorists and kill them. Admitting mistakes and trying to solve them is way better than giving a deaf ear, and blind sight to the other side, and denying the facts.

I also should define “kill” for you. I have stated this in many posts. The army should kill or bring to justice “Radical-Islamists-Terrorists-MB directed-Qaeda lovers-bloody killers-Alah Wa Akbar fanatics”. I never said the army should kill people.

You went to say “the only sympathy people of Aleppo had for the MBs was for the shere fact that they were able to stand up to the regime”.

The same thing is happening now. Sympathy with corruption, sympathy with killers, sympathy with armed men just because there may be a chance they will bring the government down. Anyone who is sympathizer with evil, in my opinion, is evil

332 MAJEDKHALDOON “Turkey is part of NATO, and involving NATO could leads to wider wars, I am against military action by Turkey. if it becomes reality,it has to be fast.to get involved in long war of atrition it is a major mistake, better not do it”

NATO will not attack Syria, the bill is high. Already 31 US troops killed yesterday in Afghanistan, today 4 were added. This could get even worse if the NATO attacked Syria. Israel will not allow that. I will remind you after 5 months and I stand by my words; NATO will never attack

Tara # 341: “Security council to review Syria again in few days. Atrocities in Dair al Zor might be a turning point”.

Sure, they will meet, and they will charge President Assad of so and so. What is next???That is the question; what is next???

August 7th, 2011, 1:30 pm

 

Tara said:

Hey guys, FYI

Tara sent white Magnolia flowers to the state Department addressed to Mr. Ford while visiting in the US last week. The card was signed by Tara. I said I would do it if his FB statement was authentic and it was. We spent lot of time discussing that statement….I liked his use of the word Mnhebaks. These flowers were well deserved.

It is my deepest conviction that many more thousands of innocent civilians would have been murdered by this regime if the world was not watching.

August 7th, 2011, 1:33 pm

 

Aboud said:

There you go Professor Landis. It’s been a few hours since I posted #321, and what do we have to show for it? Did I use the word scum? Didn’t I ask some very valid questions, while getting across my complete and utter contempt for junior in a
civilized manner?

The thing is professor, the lack of substantive discourse from the Baathists has nothing to do with insults. They just have never been used to answering the hard questions. All they know how to do is reaffirm their love and loyalty to junior in the loudest way possible.

It’s not even junior the person they love. They would have done the same for Basil, and Cro-Magnum Maher if he had happened to become president. You could put up a donkey and give it the Assad family name, and they would wave its pictures and kill and slaughter in its name.

Khaled @327, yes I am in serious, despite the whine from #333 (another whine about Aboud’s location. It must be Sunday). And don’t worry

about anyone tracking me. I wear a disguise while surfing the Internet.

Haha, no seriously, I’m not about to discuss what I do, but I’ve proven time and again I’m in Homs.

The menhebaks here have yet to prove they aren’t actually Iranians. They seem to get so touchy when someone insults the ayatollahs.

N.Z @ 340 “If I own a gun and a thug is

threatening the lives of my loved ones, what will my reaction be? ”

You have every right to put a bullet through that shabiha ( edited, Aboud: do not use the word scum. Read JL post) eyes.

August 7th, 2011, 1:34 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Ms. Sha’ban’s response to the Turks is a reassurance that this regime is from a bygone era.

August 7th, 2011, 1:35 pm

 

Aboud said:

Comments not posting again. I’ll wait a bit and then re-post.

N.Z, the pathetic regime thinks it can talk to Turkey the same way it talks to the SSNP in Lebanon.

Regarding the routine whine @333, when pray tell was all of Homs’ electricity cut off? The 3G network has been fine, even when the ADSL has been cut.

But the pony tail the Baathists have conferred on me is truly wondrous. It can cause menhebaks to get banned. It can make menhebak comments almost incomprehensible from grammatical mistakes. It can make them gnash their teeth and bitch that this has become Aboud Comment. And it can cause the menhebaks to spend roughly 50% of their time whining about Aboud 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 1:35 pm

 

jad said:

Good for you Tara, don’t forget to send him another one when his caucasian government start bombing Syrians later this year, very high morals indeed..

This is the most selective moderation I ever saw on SC, if SNK write the ‘S’ word not his but as an example of Miss Dudi language then his word will be deleted immediately but when Miss Dudi write the same word it stays.
What’s going on SC moderator?? Are you taking the side of Tara’s girlfriend Dudi? I thought we want to have a better Syria not another version of nepotism and corruption we are having today.

August 7th, 2011, 1:39 pm

 
 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

Tara,

About Nasrallah, I think he lost one son, Hadi, not two. Are you sure?
.

August 7th, 2011, 1:46 pm

 

jad said:

Frm FB:
“الفوار في دير الزور بعد دخول الجيش:
قولوا للشبيحةالديرية مزيحة”

August 7th, 2011, 1:47 pm

 

N.Z. said:

The Downfall of Assad is the awaited and final step in this Heroic Syrian Revolution.

August 7th, 2011, 1:48 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

The US is made fully aware that Syrians do not want physical foreign intervention and I stand my position. I am against all forms of physical foreign intervention including HA and the Iranian ones. We, Syrians, like to do thing without physical help from others. I welcome though all sanctions that can weaken the regime. Syrians can endure poverty and hunger. They can not endure humiliation. This is a genetic trait and we just can not help it.

In term of flowers, Tara is a simple person you know. She does not hide things and likes to express her emotions. She likes to use flowers in that expression. What is the problem with that?

August 7th, 2011, 1:52 pm

 

some guy in damascus said:

@ khalid tlass
your concern is very well received. and no i cant be tracked, i’ve taken my pre-cautions. you no longer have to wonder how things will go own in midan, it will always be that voice that screams no in bashars face. im trying to participate in a demonstration somewhere else in Damascus. we have to spread it, like we did in the hassan mosque in abu remaneh. the next destination will truly shock the regime.

August 7th, 2011, 1:54 pm

 

Tara said:

Amir

I am not sure. It seems to me I always lived in disillusion, a life long disillusion. And facing reality all of the sudden is shocking me. I am very very angry and very very sad. I have always been in love with HA so have been most Syrians I know. I could not manage not to fall in love with Nasralla. I never liked fuzzy beard, religious dress but managed to not see it when I painted a picture for HA in my brain. This was only enforced by the withdrawal of Israel from South Lebanon and with Israel stepping down from it’s usual arrogance to negotiate with HA the release of their Lebanese fighters for the dead Israeli soldiers. I was in a denial stage first… I am coming to an acceptance, and this is truly very hard. This was not about benevolence. It is all about power…

August 7th, 2011, 2:15 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Funeral processions are a constant target of Assad thugs. These are the newest reforms of Souriya alaasad.

August 7th, 2011, 2:17 pm

 

SYRIAN HAMSTER said:

N.Z. @ 349
Here you go. Repetitions are exactly as they appeared in the Martyr’s own singing. I read while humming the melody, with due reverence to the Martyr, off course.

ويا بشار ويا مندس تضرب إنت وحزب البعث
روح صلح حرف الإس ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

الله محيي أهل الريف واحد منهم ما منعيف
نقسم معاهم الرغيف ورأس الفتنة يا بشار
حاسس إني مو مطول وعلى أمن الدولة محول
ويالله ارحل يا بشار

علمتونا نحسد بعض وسويتوا الرشاوي فرض
علينا وما أغلى العرض ويلعن عرضك يا بشار
نحنا الكل منفدي الكل ولحظة وحدة ما منمل
والحر ما بيرضى الذل ويا الله ارحل يا بشار
ويالله ارحل يا بشار

يا بشار و يا خسيس و دم الشهداء مانو رخيص
و ضبلي غراضك بالكيس و يلا ارحل يا بشار …
ويابشار طز فيك وطز يلي بيحيك
والله ما بنطلع فيك ويلا ارحل يا بشار …….
.. ===========

وبدنا نشيلو لبشار وبهمتنا القوية
سوريا بدا حرية…. سوريا بدا حرية….
وبلا ماهر وبلا بشار وهالعصابة الهمجية
سوريا بدا حرية…. سوريا بدا حرية….

.. ===========

يا بشار ومانّك منّا خود ماهر وارحل عنّا
شريعتك سقطت عنّا ويلا ارحل يا بشار
ويالله ارحل يا بشار

يا ماهر ويا جبان ويا عميل الامريكان
الشعب السوري ما بينهان ويلا ارحل يا بشار

ويا بشار ويا كذاب وتضرب انت وهالخطاب
الحريّة صارت عالباب ويلا ارحل يا بشار
ويالله ارحل يا بشار

..=========..

و بدنا نشيلو لبشار وبهمتنا القوية ..
سوريّا بدا حرية .. ســوريّا بـدا .. حريـــة ..

..========..

لسا كل فترة حرامي شاليش وماهر ورامي
سرقوا اخواتي وعمامي ويلا ارحل يا بشار
ويلا ارحل يا بشار

يا بشار طز فيك وطز بيلي بيحييك
ما بقى حدا يطلع فيك ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

ويا بشار حاجة تدور ودمك بحماه مهدور
وخطأك مانو مغفور ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

لسع كل فترة حرامي شاليش وماهر ورامي
سرقوا إخواتي وعمامي ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

يا بشار مالك منا خود ماهر وإرحل عنا
وهاي شرعيتك سقطت عنا ويا الله ارحل يا بشار
ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

ويا بشار ويا كذاب تضرب إنت وهالخطاب
الحرية صارت عالباب ويا لله ارحل يا بشار

ويا ماهر ويا جبان ويا عميل الأمريكان
والشعب السوري ما بينهان ويا الله ارحل يا بشار

وبحماه صحينا بكير …. على صوت النواعير
وسألوا الناس شو صاير ؟؟؟ وقالوا بشار بدو يطير

وطلع الواطي عالخطاب …. وصفقولوا شوية كلاب
وحط الثورة ورا الباب …. ونسي مطلب الشباب

بدكن بشار ؟؟ لا و الله
بدكن بشار ؟؟؟ لا و الله

و طلبنا منو الرحيل و الواطي ما خادمنا
و طلبنا منو الرحيل و الواطي ما خادمنا
بدكن بشار ؟؟ لا و الله
بدكن بشار ؟؟ لا و الله

و بكل وقاحة الواطي بالجراثيم وصفنا
و بكل وقاحة الواطي بالجراثيم وصفنا
بدكن بشار ؟؟ لا و الله
بدكن بشار ؟؟ لا و الله

August 7th, 2011, 2:26 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

Girls like to whine. I admit it… It is in our genetic make up and we can’t help it. You are also whining too much. It really does not fit your personality, the one I have for you some place in my mind. Kindly review your own comments by using the search option and find out how many times you personally have used bad language and leave whining to the girls. Please.

August 7th, 2011, 2:29 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Syrians are hurt by Hizballah’s stance. However, the unanswered question of who assassinated Mughniya , under the watchful eyes of Assad security forces, in Damascus must not be dismissed. Iran, so far is the only left supporter of Assad Mafia. Nasrallah in his last speeches avoided mentioning anything related to Syria.

Assad mafia benefited much more from Hizbullah, it is not the other way around. Two thousand strong men kicked the Israelis from their midst, while Assad father declared the fall of Syrian land in the hands of the enemy before one shot was fired. Junior continued his father’s policy, he did not lift a finger in their face. Machiavellian in every conceivable way.

Unlike the principled Hizbullah and the Lebanese Shiites.

The way this thuggish entity is dealing with its own people speaks volume. They threatened the Turks with the Kurds, ICG, they are bullies to the end. It is a family that will do anything to ensure its survival, patriotism is not in their dictionary.

August 7th, 2011, 2:52 pm

 

N.Z. said:

364. SYRIAN HAMSTER,

My sincerest thanks!

The simplicity of Mr. Kashoush words are legendary. Thank you.

August 7th, 2011, 3:07 pm

 

Khalid Tlass said:

@ Guy in Damascus and Aboud –

May Allah keep you bravehearts safe. Salutes.

Btw, is there any way of sending humanitarian convoys of trucks with essential supplies like bread, fruits, milk, medicines and baby food to Hama ? How can we circumvent the siege by the baby killers ?

August 7th, 2011, 3:58 pm

 

Aboud said:

Hello Khalid. People in Rastan have, as I’ve heard, managed to get supplies to Hama. Thankfully alot of Hamwis managed to relocate to the Wadi, they could use some assistance.

Menhebaks, perhaps my previous questions were too challenging for you. Like a generous teacher giving a make-up exam to an (epically) failing student, I’ll give you an easy one;

Why was a demonstration of doctors at the Aleppo University Hospital broken up and people arrested by the shabiha (the Athad family’s ill disciplined, barbaric, brownshirt-type thugs).

August 7th, 2011, 4:10 pm

 

Sheila said:

To all and more specifically Jad,
What is the story with Jad?. His comments are 100% pro-regime and then he posts articles (4 so far that I have read) that shred the regime to pieces. So what is it Jad? Are you pro or against regime???? Or is it that you are not reading these articles carefully and thinking that they are pro-regime when they absolutely ar not?. I just do not believe this could be a possibility, but I a trying hard to understand.

August 7th, 2011, 4:25 pm

 

Sheila said:

To all,
I have another puzzling question: what is the story with the likes and dislikes? I posted a factual comment on Majedkhaldoon’s question and answered a question that he had directed to me. Nothing to like or dislike. I still had 9 dislikes. I just don’t get it. Is it that some people just go around clicking dislikes based on the name without reading the posting? Does anyone have a different explanation?.

August 7th, 2011, 4:29 pm

 

Aboud said:

Sheila

“Is it that some people just go around clicking dislikes based on the name without reading the posting?”

Sadly it would appear so. Professor Landis bent over backwards to be accommodating to as many different viewpoints as possible. This was one of the few websites where the Baathists could air their views.

They did not make good use of the privilege. Lately their posts have consisted of gloating at the army’s murder of civilians (which I know for a fact has put off alot of people), serving as SANA spam bots, whining about Aboud 🙂 , and spamming the Dislike button.

August 7th, 2011, 4:36 pm

 

Cabinet Stomatologic said:

is there anyting wrong … no when USA get into other bussines be sure all will be ruined!

August 7th, 2011, 4:43 pm

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

Tara,

I’m surprised that you’re surprised. It’s all about power, money and who has the biggest. This is a men’s world. You whine about emotions; we men, whine about size and potency.

I don’t want to speak bad on HA. They are Israel’s enemies. I try to put myself in their shoes. If the Assad clan is gone, HA will be surrounded by enemies from 3 sides. By Jews in the south, and by much more hostile Sunnies in the east and north. I’m not surprised that Nasrallah is desperate to keep the Assads in power. I would be surprised if it was be otherwise.
.

August 7th, 2011, 4:52 pm

 

Friend in America said:

The past few months have been so critical for Syrians that I chose to try to understand everybody’s concerns on this blog as best as possible. I notice some movement in the close to 400 comments here. Support for negotiations has been expressed by both supporters of the protesters and supporters of the government.

We need to look at the present realities and encourage doing what can be done.

1. What do the demonstrators want (what are their interests)? .I think most of us have failed to understand the gravity of these interests: They are:
a. An end to the secret police, its torture chambers and detention without charges together with release of all imprisoned demonstrators.
b. Prosecution of those who have engaged in torture and murder.
c. Freedom of speech, press and assembly.
d. Fair and equal participation in an orderly selection of government officials.
e. Dignity and respect.

The Assad family and inner group will find common ground on any of these very difficult because each constitute ending a pillar that supports the Assad government.

2. What is the interest of the Assad leadership group?
a. 4 years ago on this site I received a reply from a leading government official that the foreign and domestic policy of the Assad government has been, is and will be whatever will strengthen the Assad family’s control of Syria. I see no difference today.
b. So, the government has and will continue to seek restoration of the status quo and to achieve that end will use each of the powers that the protesters want eliminated.

3. Who is the leader of the Assad government?
There is an inner council that makes final decisions. Bashar is just one member. The chair is the grandfather, who is not current with the times. Those who have written here that Bashar does not have the final say are correct, but that does not mean Basher is a figurehead. There are hawks in this inner council; Basher’s brother and Bashar’s brother-in-law are two notable examples and they appear to have grandfather’s favor at present. Eliminate the secret police and the elite army division and those two will leave the country.

4. The foregoing assessment leads to the conclusion that negotiations would be fruitless. That is exactly where professional diplomats step in.
a First a self appointed “go-between” needs to step forward. Either side could put out a feeler. A Norwegian diplomat is an ideal selection. Norway is a small country so no one could trash the negotiations by claiming the parties are being pushed into settlement by a powerful country and their diplomats are very skilled communicators.
b. It is possible the parties‘ representatives will never meet until the very end (as was with the Palestine-Israel accords) or successive face to face meetings could be held.

Now is the time to start this process.

5. Who can negotiate? Big question but solvable. If the Assad family remains as intransigent as suggested above, the intermediary needs to go to secondary leadership, such as the capitalists, the generals and the moderate baathists. This will be dangerous for them (there are ways to provide for their security). For the demonstrators, a committee can be organized quickly.

6. Is there enough time for such negotiations? I am not sure. The Iranians are in Damascus and will become increasingly more influential in Syrian affairs. Perhaps the Assads could be persuaded to stop all security and military activity in return for moderated or cessation of demonstrations but if this happened everyone would known something was happening behind “close doors.” Time is not on the side of a peaceful process. Any suggestions?

August 7th, 2011, 5:03 pm

 

Aboud said:

Just heard a short, dignified statement by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia on Al-Arabiya.

Saudi Arabia says that the killing of innocent civilians cannot be justified in any shape or form. It called on the Syrian government to implement genuine reforms, and not just promises.

Oh, and it recalled its ambassador.

Saudi Arabia obviously sees that the continuing indiscriminate crackdown by the regime will only lead to a civil war in Syria. The Lebanese civil war messed up the region pretty badly. Obviously, the Saudis don’t feel keeping junior is worth the risk of a Syrian Civil War, the ramifications of which would be felt far beyond the region.

Calling for comprehensive and genuine reforms means the same thing as telling junior his time is up. A free election, free press and free representative would be the end of Baathist rule of Syria, and its domination of Lebanon.

I look forward to the Iranian response. Junior should be concerned if all we hear is silence from Tehran.

August 7th, 2011, 5:15 pm

 

Norman said:

Shiela,

We do not put article we agree with we put article that stimulate the discussion and believe it or not many of us do not like the regime as it is and we want regime change to a more democratic one with bill of rights , I personally would want for Syria what we have in the US , we just do not want chaos and destruction, we want a peaceful opportunity for the opposition to gain power and be assured that they will leave power if the lose the next election, is that too much to ask, I do not think so, the problem that i see is that if the transfere of power is through violence then we would be replacing a dictatorship with another as the people who suffered to reach power will feel entitled to stay there,

The only chance is for the opposition to seek dialogue and push faster for removing article 8 in return for tranquility in the streets , then move toward starting political parties and election at the end of the year, my preference to have small districts and decentralization that will make people more responsible for their own lives and their tax base .

August 7th, 2011, 5:18 pm

 

Tara said:

KSA recalling it’s ambassador to discuss Syria. The king issued a strong statement. American diplomacy at work… You go Hillary.

Amir,

agree. It is all about money and power. Naive Tara and most of her generation believed otherwise in the past…. I really did. I told you, life long disillusion.

Just one correction, Sunnis to the east were never hostile to HA. Nasrallah pictures were all over Syria and never bothered us( to the opposite of how we felt towards the treo Besho, Basel, and Hafiz). HA had such a poor vision. Nasrallah did not know that no matter how powerful a dictator is, people will eventually prevail.

August 7th, 2011, 5:24 pm

 

N.Z. said:

The unfortunate timing of the Israeli upheaval, in my opinion will give Assad more time in his killing spree. America is awaiting a signal from Netanyahu, Assad fall will no doubt inspire the Israelis and hasten their democratically elected figureheadout of power. I care for neither.

Assad is finished, however his hatred to the Syrian people has no limit. More innocents will lose their lives. Till then, this bull and his cronies will quench their thirst with Syrian blood, brethren blood.

August 7th, 2011, 5:29 pm

 

Mango said:

1 moment for thinking !!!

جرح العشرات في أعمال شغب شمالي لندن ..بالفيديو والصور
لندن, أب 7, 2011
جرح العشرات في أعمال شغب شمالي لندن ..بالفيديو والصور
جرح ما لا يقل عن 49 شخصا بعد أن تعرض ضباط شرطة وبنايات ومركبات لهجوم جمهور غاضب على إثر مقتل شاب برصاص الشرطة.
وقد جرح 26 ضابط شرطة وثلاثة أشخاص آخرون الليلة الفائتة نتيجة أحداث العنف التي اندلعت على إثر مقتل الشاب مارك دوجان.
وقد قام سكان حي توتينهام بإحصاء الخسائر بعد أن تعرضت بنايات ومحالات تجارية للنهب.

وقال متحدث باسم شرطة لندن إن اثنين من ضباط الشرطة مازالا يتلقيان العلاج في المستشفى، وان الشرطة اعتقلت 40 شخصا.

وقات مصادر الشرطة إن “جيوبا إجرامية” كانت ما تزال في المنطقة صباح الأحد.
وقد تعرضت محال تجارية وماكنات الصراف الآلي للنهب في توتينام.
وقال متحدث باسم دائرة المطافئ إن بعض فرق الاطفاء ما تزال تحاول إطفاء حرائق، وإن النيران تحت السيطرة.
ودانت وزيرة الداخلية تيريزا ماي أحداث العنف وقالت انه لن يتم التسامح مع هذا الاستهتار بالممتلكات والسلامة العامة وإن الشرطة تحظى بالدعم التام من أجل استعادة النظام.
وقال قائد شرطة لندن ادريان هانستوك “”تجاوز مستوى العنف الحدود المعقولة، وتحولت جلسة ليلية تضامنية الى أحداث عنف بعد أن سيطر عليها الأشقياء”.
ووصف متحدث باسم مكتب رئيس الوزراء البريطاني الأحداث بأنها “غير مقبولة مطلقا.
وكان شبان قد ألقوا قنابل حارقة على أفراد الشرطة ومحل تجاري ما أدى إلى اشتعال النيران في سيارتي شرطة وحافلة.
واندلعت الاضطرابات بعد أن تحولت احتجاجات السكان المحليين على إطلاق الشرطة النار على شاب وقتله الخميس إلى أعمال عنف.
واحتشد نحو 300 شخص خارج محطة الشرطة في شارع “هاي ستريت” يطالبون بـ “العدالة” بعد قتل الشرطة لشاب يدعى مارك دوغان وكان يبلغ من العمر 29 عاما، وهو أب لأربعة أطفال.
ووصف مراسل بي بي سي بن أندو الوضع بأنه “مواجهة” بين الطرفين.
وأضرمت النيران في سيارتي شرطة في الساعة 20.20 بتوقيت بريطانيا الصيفي الموافق لـ 19.20 بتوقيت جرينتش لكن ضباط الشرطة لم يكونوا موجودين في السيارتين آنذاك.
وتعرضت بعض المحلات التجارية في المنطقة إلى أعمال سلب إذ شوهد أشخاص وهم يجرون عربات جر مليئة بالبضائع المسروقة.
كما أضرمت النيران في حافلة من طابقين وفي محل تجاري.
وقال ناطق باسم شرطة العاصمة إن حشودا كبيرة من الناس تجمعت لكن ليس جميع المحتجين شاركوا في الاضطرابات.
وقالت الشرطة إن أعمال العنف اندلعت عندما ركنت الشرطة سيارتي دورية على مسافة 200 متر من مكان تجمع المحتجين.
وقالت إحدى المحتجات وتدعى فينيسا روبنسون إنها انضمت إلى احتجاج سلمي خارج محطة شرطة لكن الوضع انقلب إلى ” فوضى مطلقة.”
وقال أحد سكان المنطقة ويدعى ديفيد أكينسانيا إن نوافذ بعض المحلات التجارية هشمت.
وفتحت لجنة الشكاوى المستقلة في إدارة الشرطة تحقيقا لمعرفة سبب إطلاق النار على دوغان.

August 7th, 2011, 5:31 pm

 

Abu Umar said:

“323. mjabali said: ”

Do you support the trial of Bashar, Shawkat, Maher, etc for the thousands they have killed?

You know Mjabali, Ali Ibn Abi Talib would be leading the battle against your regime if he was alive.

August 7th, 2011, 5:34 pm

 

Amir in Tel Aviv said:

Dear mamnhebaks, Aboud and Tara,

If I were you, I wouldn’t have cheered about the Saudi king intervention. The Saudi people too is oppressed. If you cheer the king, morally you are like Nasralla. Pick your new friends carefully. I would tell the king: Thank you, but stay away. And do reform Saudi Arabia before you preach to others.
.

August 7th, 2011, 5:42 pm

 

Tara said:

Report: UN accuses Iran, hizbullah of killing Syrian soldiers
By Naharnet Newsdesk
Yesterday 

http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/12144-report-u-n-accuses-iran-hizbullah-of-killing-syrian-soldiers

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) committee said that Iran and Hizbullah are involved in killing Syrian soldiers who refused to shoot at anti-regime protesters, the French radio station reported on Saturday.
more…

August 7th, 2011, 5:46 pm

 

Norman said:

http://www.alquds.co.uk

The Baath party is preparing for the cancellation of article 8 ,

البعث الحاكم يتجه للاستثمار وينوي شراء مقراته في سورية استباقاً لاحتمال إلغاء المادة 8

دمشق ـ ‘القدس العربي’ ـ من كامل صقر: في تطور داخلي لافت، علمت ‘القدس العربي’ من مصادر في حزب البعث الحاكم بسورية أن قيادة الحزب بحثت في آخر اجتماع غير معلن عقدته منذ عدة أيام اتخاذ إجراءات وخطوات لوجستية يتوجب على البعث القيام بها كتحرك استباقي لمرحلة ‘ما بعد إلغاء المادة الثامنة من الدستور’ والتي باتت حسب كثير من المراقبين مسألة وقت لا أكثر.
وقالت المصادر ان إلغاء المادة الثامنة يعني حكماً أن حزب البعث سيصبح مجرداً من الامتيازات والاستثناءات التي يملكها على الأرض والتي منحها له دستور العام 1973 بموجب المادة 8 منه، الأمر الذي يعني حاجته لتأمين موارد دخل تعوضه بشكل أو بآخر عن الموارد التي كانت تحت تصرفه قبل الإلغاء.
المصادر كشفت أن حزب البعث الحاكم اشترى مؤخراً قطعة أرض بمبلغ 150 مليون ليرة سورية (3 ملايين دولار) في إحدى مناطق ريف دمشق لإقامة جامعة تعليمية خاصة تشكل لاحقاً موردا مالياً رديفاً، والأبرز فيما كشفته ذات المصادر نية البعث بشراء كافة مقرات الحزب الحالية في العاصمة دمشق وبقية مقرات فروعه في المحافظات السورية، لأن استخدامه لتلك المقرات عموماً يأتي من خلال تخصيصها له كونه الحزب القائد للدولة والمجتمع وبالتالي فإن إلغاء هذه الصفة أو الحالة السياسية عنه لاحقاً يعني عدم إمكانية إشغال هذه المقرات ما لم تكن ملكاً له.
ويقع مقر القيادة القطرية في أكثر أحياء دمشق رقياً وغلاء في أبو رمانة، و كذلك الأمر بالنسبة لمقر القيادة القومية الكائن بحي البرامكة وسط دمشق، كما أن مقر فرع دمشق للحزب ومقرات بقية الفروع في المحافظات جميعها تقع في أحياء حيوية وراقية.
ويتجه البعث أيضاً لاستثمار ما يسمى ‘بناء البعث’ وهو بناء برجي يتألف من 14 طابقاً يقع على أوتوستراد المزة، وهو ملك لحزب البعث ويقدر ثمنه بمئات الملايين ويضم أحد طوابقه جريدة البعث الناطقة باسم الحزب ووزارة الإعلام التي تستأجر مقرها داخل هذا البناء من الحزب، فيما سيتم استثمار بقية الطوابق لمصلحة الحزب عبر تأجير مكاتبها لشركات ومؤسسات .
وكان من أبرز ما بحثته قيادة البعث هو دمج الموظفين والعاملين في المنظمات الشعبية والنقابات المهنية التي أنشأها البعث منذ عقود لتكون ‘رديفاً’ اجتماعياً وشعبياً له بحيث يجري نقلهم إلى ملاكات الدولة الرسمية، إضافة للصحافيين والعاملين في جريدة ‘البعث’ وتسوية أوضاعهم مثل بقية نظرائهم في الإعلام الرسمي السوري.

ت

August 7th, 2011, 5:46 pm

 

Aboud said:

Amir, has Saudi Arabia sent arms? Have they sent funds to encourage demonstrations? Have they schemed and connived to destabilize Syria?

No, they have withdrawn their ambassador as a means of expressing their displeasure at the slaughter of civilians, especially during the month of Ramadan. In this regard, their move and statements are very welcome. They have done more than so called enlightened Western democracies, who despite their free societies, seem to have a much larger capacity for stomaching Syrian deaths.

The Saudi stand has been responsible, reasoned and humane, and nothing they have done can be inferred as interference. They have every right to express their displeasure at the policy of another country.

August 7th, 2011, 5:48 pm

 

Tara said:

Amir

I am not cheering the king. I would like to see an Arab spring in KSA next Ramadan. I am cheering Arabic and international pressure closing in on the thug in chief, Besho

August 7th, 2011, 5:50 pm

 

beaware said:

Hezbollah: UNHCR report on Syria false
August 08, 2011 01:01 AM
The Daily Star

BEIRUT: Hezbollah has denied reports that its members were involved in the killing of Syrian soldiers who had deserted the regime, the party said in a statement Sunday.

Radio France, citing an as-yet unpublished report from a United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees committee, reported over the weekend that Hezbollah members, as well as members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, had killed Syrian Army defectors.

Hezbollah slammed the U.N. study as a fabrication and part of a wider plot against the resistance.

“Hezbollah has already issued many statements denying the claims from the Syrian opposition, as well as other parties, on Hezbollah’s interference on the events taking place,” the party said in its statement.

“Hezbollah condemns these false accusations – which are not based on facts – and sees in them proof that some international organizations are joining the conspiracy targeting these forces that are against the Zionist-American project in the region,” it added.

“Hezbollah believes that [the accusations] reveal the depth of this conspiracy and its wide expansion to such an extent that many international actors are now involved in it,” the statement added, referring to the U.N.

The radio station said the 20-page report will be published in the coming days, and includes testimonies from former Syrian Army members.

The UNHCR report will, according to Radio France, say that those Syrian soldiers who refused to shoot protesters were detained by Hezbollah and Revolutionary Guards members present in Syria, before being killed.

Hezbollah, in the statement, called on the U.N. to remain accurate in its coverage. “The party calls on the U.N. and its various institutions to be accurate and credible when issuing statements and reports so that it doesn’t put itself in the position of instigating strife and disturbances, instead of being [an] organization [which] spread[s] peace and security in the world.”

While denying the claims, the party reiterated its commitment to “Syria’s safety, that of its leaders, its people and institutions, and Hezbollah’s hopes of reaching solutions that will achieve all Syrians’ aspirations for reform and stability.”

The statement added that Hezbollah was keen to respond to the U.N. claims, due to “our interest in clarifying the whole picture and preventing international and Arab public opinion from being deceived by those who wish to support the international conspiracy against the resistance forces in the region in order to achieve narrow personal goals at the expense of the Syrian people’s blood and the expense of truth and reality.”

Thousands of civilians have been killed during the popular uprising in Syria – and thousands more arrested – in demonstrations.

Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Politics/2011/Aug-08/Hezbollah-UNHCR-report-on-Syria-false.ashx#ixzz1UNt8zMvb
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)

August 7th, 2011, 6:21 pm

 

Aboud said:

Wow, you could hear a pin drop in here, its so silent all of a sudden.

Angry Arab

http://angryarab.blogspot.com/2011/08/armed-terrorist-groups-in-syria.html

“The Armed terrorist groups in Syria

Syrian regime TV is quite repulsive. It is a combination of fake religiosity, Syrian chauvinism (a la Lebanese Phoenicianism) and tons of lies. Look at the constant references to “armed terrorist groups”: what are their ideological orientations? I ask because the regime jails people on the left, center, and right and in between. Unless the regime maintains that this bizarre “armed terrorist group” comprises people of different ideological stripes. “

August 7th, 2011, 6:29 pm

 

beaware said:

Syrian Forces Open Fierce Assault on Eastern City
By ANTHONY SHADID
Published: August 7, 2011
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/08/world/middleeast/08syria.html?_r=1&ref=global-home&pagewanted=all
BEIRUT — The Syrian military defied growing condemnation and launched another assault on the country’s most restive locales Sunday, deploying dozens of tanks and armored vehicles into parts of a city in eastern Syria that it had long feared provoking, activists said. At least 20 people were killed, they said, and thousands had fled the city.
The attack before dawn on Deir al-Zour came exactly a week after Syrian forces attacked Hama, a city in central Syria that had largely wrested itself from government control this summer.

The two cities, Syria’s fourth and fifth largest, had emerged as the most defiant in a five-month uprising against four decades of rule by the Assad family. But each represented a target of repression that carried special risks for the government, even amid a crackdown that, by the count of some human rights groups, has killed more than 2,000 people.

Hama, the victim of one of the bloodiest moments in modern Middle East history, is a national symbol of violent repression. The military crushed an Islamist revolt there in 1982, killing at least 10,000 people. The assault in Hama last week, in which more than 200 people were killed, inflamed sentiments across the country.

Deir al-Zour may prove no less vexing for the government, but for different reasons. Armed and fiercely independent, the extended clans there have ties to tribes across eastern Syria and western Iraq. In past days, some of their leaders have vowed to forego peaceful protests and take up arms if the military ended up attacking, although there were no reports on Sunday of government casualties.

For weeks, Syrian activists had predicted that the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, when the observant fast from dawn to dusk, would mark an escalation of the uprising, as protesters gathered nightly in mosques then organized demonstrations. Instead, the government has chosen the time for a full-scale assault on cities that seemed most determined to throw off the yoke of the ubiquitous security forces.

“I can say the clock will never ever turn back,” declared a leader one of the largest clans in the region, who identified himself as Abu Mohammed Ala’aqidi.

The bloody and methodical attacks on both cities confirmed what many saw as the government’s determination to keep power through violence, and troubled analysts about what the next phase of the revolt would bring.

Activists put the death toll in Deir al-Zour at 20, and one resident said a family of six trying to escape — a mother and father with four children — were among the dead. Activists said that many of the residents had left in recent days. A resident who gave his name as Maamoun said that pickup trucks packed with as many as 25 women and children each were fleeing down abandoned streets, trying to avoid the fighting.

“The city has never witnessed a day like this,” he said by phone, staccato bursts of gunfire audible in the background.

He said there were shortages of fuel and bread. Other residents said private hospitals had closed. Only government facilities were open, but families were too fearful to take wounded there for fear they would be arrested.

The urban assaults came amid other signs of pressure on the government, most important perhaps, indications that the business elite in Damascus has begun preparing for the government’s fall. That elite has long proven one of the most important pillars of the Syrian leadership, most notably during the Islamist revolt in 1982.

“The regime is its own worst enemy, and it can’t be saved from itself,” said a Damascus-based analyst who asked to remain anonymous given the sensitivity of his remarks. “It is ripe for collapse but the question remains what will trigger it and when.”

Deir al-Zour, like Hama, had been the scene of mass protests, with hundreds of thousands in the streets. The city, which lies in Syria’s oil and gas-producing region, also harbors deep-seated grievances over government neglect, amplified by popular feelings that residents have yet to share in the region’s energy wealth.

For days, the military had built up forces on the city’s outskirts. A recent traveler there estimated that 150 tanks, 200 armored vehicles and 200 pickup trucks mounted with machine guns were deployed around the city.

Residents were convinced they would remain on the outskirts, fearful of provoking a battle with the city’s powerful extended clans.

“The government was very cautious to begin a military operation in our region because most of the tribes members are armed with AK-47s and rifles and they are ready to fight and not allow the regime to do the same thing as it did in Hama or Dara’a,” a town in southern Syria, where the uprising began in March, Ammar said.

“If the regime attacked Deir al-Zour, that means all the tribes in the other provinces will demonstrate against the Assad regime,” he added.

The preamble to the assault was familiar. Though no weapons were seen in a visit to Hama shortly before its siege, officials claimed the military had returned there to battle armed Islamists who had terrorized the city of 800,000.

On Saturday, it offered a similar narrative for Deir al-Zour, with a population of 500,000. A report on the official Syrian news agency SANA said clan elders there had called on the army to enter “to protect the citizens and preserve the public and private properties.”

Residents reached by telephone offered an altogether different account.

“Syria is now run by tough officers, not political decision-makers,” said Ammar, a 26-year-old activist in the city. “I’m afraid that the country is moving into a dark cave and everyone will be the loser. The first loser is President Assad and his regime.”

The Local Coordination Committees, a group that has tried to document and organize the protests, said the assault began before dawn, as the military stormed nine neighborhoods in the city.

“We are completely surrounded,” said a driver who gave his name as Abu Omar.

There have been periodic reports of military defections in Deir al-Zour, though they still seem to be limited and pose no direct threat to President Bashar al-Assad, who inherited power from his father, Hafez, in 2000. The coordination committees said more soldiers had defected Sunday in the city’s Joura neighborhood.

“The defected soldiers are trying to protect the residents from a storming of the city,” the committees said. There was no immediate confirmation of the report by residents there.

The extent and ferocity of the crackdown has given an almost surreal façade to persistent government promises to reform. In the latest overture by Mr. Assad’s leadership, Foreign Minister Walid Moallem said Saturday that true multiparty elections for Parliament, the first during the Assad family’s rule, would be held by the end of the year. Scheduled for August, those elections had been delayed. SANA quoted him as saying the elections would “free and transparent.”

On the same day Mr. Moallem made the promise, security forces arrested Walid al-Bunni, a prominent opposition figure and former political prisoner, along with his two sons. Mr. Bunni was a prime mover of the so-called Damascus Spring, an attempt by opposition figures to organize a democratic reform movement in 2000 that Mr. Assad soon crushed.

Over the weekend, calls mounted for restraint. The Arab League expressed “growing concern” over the violence on Sunday and called on authorities to stop attacks on protesters. Also on Sunday, Pope Benedict XVI called for Mr. Assad to respond to the “legitimate aspirations” of the Syrian people, and Turkey announced that it was dispatching its foreign minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, to Damascus on Tuesday with a similar message.

Hwaida Saad contributed reporting from Beirut, and an employee of The New York Times from Damascus.

August 7th, 2011, 6:30 pm

 

Norman said:

They are trying to destroy Hezbollah, The only fighting force that stood to Israel, the West and their allies moved from confronting Syria and Hezbollah, when that failed to stir the Syrian street against the government and bring Syria to submission ,then destroy Hezbollah,

August 7th, 2011, 6:40 pm

 

Aboud said:

Norman, if Hizbollah were really so *stupid* as to send its thugs to Syria, then it destroyed itself.

August 7th, 2011, 6:42 pm

 

beaware said:

Syria to become second Libya?
Sun Aug 7, 2011 9:58PM GMT
By Mohyeddin Sajedi
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/192851.html

Syrian state media news editors-in-chief are going through some tough times.
Most of them wish not to publish any news of the demonstrations and the assault of the armed men on security forces and instead turn to the analysis of the reforms ordered recently by the Syrian President Bashar Assad; the general election and the multi-party laws, for example, which transformed Syria into a plural and multi-dimensional country from political and partisan perspectives.

The Syrian television did not broadcast live the trial of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s ousted president, and even official newspapers refrained from reflecting his prosecution; only one newspaper referred to the confrontations between the pro- and anti-Mubarak demonstrators prior to his trial in Cairo.

Glossing over the Mubarak trial is not restricted to Syria; nearly all of the Arabic state televisions evaded live broadcast and delegated the responsibility to unofficial news networks like the Arabic Aljazeera.

Fear of a repeat of the fate of Hosni Mubarak, it seems, has swept sleep from the eyes of many Arab leaders.

According to the multi-party law in Syria, no party can be formed based on the ethnicity, race, religion, faith or color. No party should have a military or paramilitary structure either.

Such restriction practically signifies a review in the structure of the ruling Baath Party in Syria, which was founded on Arab ethnocentrism and enjoys extensive paramilitary organizations across Syria.

If this is a correct definition, then Bashar al-Assad has taken a giant reformation stride, which has been lost in the mutual commotion and bloodshed. The rule of the Baath Party is one of the basic articles of the Syrian Constitution and its change requires the modification of the Constitution, which is a duty of the parliament.

Currently, there is practically no parliament in Syria and no specific time has been determined for the formation of a new parliament. The paradox is an example of the slow implementation of reforms.

The ratification of new reform laws in Syria has by no means satisfied the opposition and chief Western governments. The recent statement by the United Nations Security Council regarding the developments in Syria is the effort of some for turning the crisis in Syria into an international issue.

The Western governments were looking for a resolution, but with the opposition of Syria, China, Brazil, India, Lebanon, and South Africa it was downgraded to a statement. This statement both condemns the violent measures of the Syrian government in its dealings with the opposition and calls on the opposition not to attack government institutions.

The “balance” was the demand of the Russians, who have a naval base in Syria’s Tartous Port. But will it persist? Putin, Russia’s prime minister, is warning Assad that if he doesn’t submit to the reforms, he might face a miserable fate (like Hosni Mubarak or Ben Ali).

It shouldn’t slip one’s mind that the passing of a resolution in support of the Libyan people and the establishment of a no-fly zone morphed into a permit for the Western governments and the NATO to authorize the rocket and a air raids on this country and expel Libyan diplomats from their capitals and to provide financial, food, and arms aids and military instruction to the opponents of Gaddafi.

Not only has NATO’s military intervention not helped to end the crisis in this country, but it has also deepened it. The current balance between the two sides in Libya means the possibility of the war in this country becoming corrosive and the subsequently the practical disintegration of this country. Not even the defection of some of the army units to the opposition forces has tipped the current equations.

In response to the statement by NATO’s secretary general who had said that the situation is not ripe for NATO’s intervention in Syria, Russia’s representative in NATO says that NATO is hatching a plan for attacking Syria.

The leaders of the US, France, and Germany have in their latest contacts demanded the intensification of pressure on Syria.

The White House has not specified what the new means of exerting pressure will be, but the inclination in the administrative circles of the US has leaked into the media that the US is seeking a division in the Syrian Army.

The US foreign secretary meets with Assad’s opponents and persuades the Western states like Canada to take similar steps. Perhaps the next step is officially recognizing a transitional council of the Bashar Assad opposition. News has been heard from Washington that Hillary Clinton fears the initiation of a civil war and religious strife in Syria by Bashar Assad.

So far these comments can be considered part of the psychological warfare and further rallying against the Syrian regime. The Libya experience does not allow the West and the NATO coalition a rerun in Syria. The only solution is a military coup or the crippling of the army and the greater spread of demonstrations which makes efficient use of the internet social websites.

Provoking the Syrian army into splitting and facing one another increase the possibility of a civil war.

Inciting revolt in Syria will turn into its destructive form. The assassination of Abdul Fatah Younis in Libya rang alarm bells for those countries who downplayed the possibility of the infiltration of al-Qaeda among the Gaddafi opposition. Will a war-torn and divided Syria, besides an Israel facing social and financial crises, help the preservation of Western interests?

August 7th, 2011, 6:44 pm

 

syau said:

Syrian tv have just aired pictures of security personnel murdered in Hama then dumped into the Assi river, Hama.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-nbO09UNSI&feature=channel_video_title

For those who claim the river is dry in Hama, you may want to reconsider your claims.

This is the reality of the revolution in Syria.

August 7th, 2011, 7:17 pm

 

Jad said:

على عاهل الوهابية وعراب القتل الأمريكي أن يخرس، مثل زملائه الإيرانيين والأمريكان والفرنسيين..  
الكاتب بسام القاضي   
08/ 08/ 2011

تفتقت خاصرة عاهل الوهابية السعودية التي تمثل أحط ما في مدعي الإسلام، من مغتصبي الطفلات باسم الزواج المبكر ومنقبي النساء لأنهن فتنة على الأرض، وهو عاهل القتل الأمريكي الذي فتح أراضي مملكته منذ دهر لقافلة القتل الأمريكية  التي دمرت العراق، والذي وضع بصمة إبهامه الأسود على استدعاء الناتو لقصف ليبيا.. تفتقت خاصرته أخيرا عن أنه “يتحمل مسؤولياته تجاه الشعب السوري”، معتقدا أن الشعب السوري يضمن خونة وعملاء أمثلا رضوان زيادة ومحمد العبدالله ومرح بقاعي، يمكنهم أن يبيعوه البلد بواحدة من الفضة!

عاهل الموت هذا، حاضن المجرم العرعور ومجرمون كثر غيره، وراعي قناة الإجرام المسماة “العربية” التي حولت كل مفهوم للإعلام إلى تجارة موت بترويجها الكذب والنفاق والفبركة والتحريض المكشوف والعلني، وهومن جر دباباته إلى المنطقة الشرقية في مملكته ليقتل ويشرد مرات ومرات (إن كان هناك من يريد أن يتذكر)، هو الذي يعيش على سيرومات الجيوش الغربية حاضنته، هو الذي قدم ليبيا على طبق من خيانة لأساطيل الغرب تقصف ليبيا باسم “الحرية” (وسوف تدفع ليبيا ثمن كل قذيقة قصفت بها!)، هذا العاهل الذي كان يجب أن يوضع في مأوى عجزة مثله مثل ثلاثة أرباع أسرته الحاكمة التي تجاوزت حد الخرف منذ زمن، خرج علينا اليوم ليقول أنه “يشعر بمسوليته تجاه الشعب السوري”؟

من قال لك يا عراب الموت أن الشعب السوري يريد شعورك المنافق؟ من قال لك أن سوريا واحدا أو سورية لا ينظر إليك على أنك مومياء تشكل عارا على المنطقة العربية كلها؟ من قال لك أن أحدا نسي أو سينسى جرائمك في مملكتك الأبدية أو في العراق أو لبنان أو ليبيا؟! من قال لك أن أحدا هنا يقبل حتى أن يبادلك الحديث؟! من قال لك أن سوريا أو سورية يقبلون أن تلوث حبة تراب من وطنهم؟!

الشعب السوري يقول لك: التفت إلى ما تبقى من عقلك الذي أكله الزهايمر.. ويقول لك، ولميركل، ولكل الجيوش الأجنبية: 
نقسم أننا سوف نحول صدورنا أسلحة لقتلكم إن فكرتكم للحظة أن تكرروا سيناريو ليبيا في سورية. فسورية عصية على قذارتكم.. وسورية يمكنها أن تتصارع من أجل مستقبلها بلا هوادة، لكنها ستكون يدا واحدة لقطع أياديكم القذرة..

وبمناسبة هذا التهديد الخطير لسورية ومستقبلها، أوجه رسالة بالغة الوضوح لكل مدعي الثقافة والنخبة في سورية، وأخص بالذكر المدعويين:
سهير الأتاسي، رزان زيتونة، لؤي حسين، ميشيل كيلو، فايز سارة، حازم نهار، مازن درويش، عارف دليلة، برهان غليون، وغيرهم:
إذا لم تدينوا هذا التدخل وترفضوه قولا واحدا لايحتمل أي تأويل، ولا يفتح أي باب لتبرير أو تحميل مسؤوليات، فأنتم، بالنسبة لي شخصيا، أعداء مجرمون وعملاء يعملون على شن حرب عسكرية ضد سورية، وتمزيقها وتدميرها..

وبالتالي، فسأعمل، أنا المواطن السوري الذي لا يمتلك سوى قلمه، كل ما أستطيع لفضحكم بكل لغات العالم، ولتأليب كل إنسان عليكم بصفتكم خونة مشهودة خيانتكم علنا.

والأمر ينطبق على كل من يتسمى باسم “تنسيقية”. فكل منها لا تدين صراحة وبلا لبس ولا تبرير هذا التدخل السافر والقذر والذي يشكل بداية الدعوة لتدخل الناتو، هي تنسيقية عميلة وخائنة وتستحق أن تواجه بالعنف بلا رحمة..

لنتذكر جميعا من هو هذا العاهل الذي يقود ويدعم الموت باسم الدين في كل مكان، والذي مهد الأرض التي داس عليه كل الجنود القتلة الغربيون ليدمروا بلداننا واحدا تلو الآخر.. وها هو اليوم يمارس دوره نحو سورية، حالما بأن يبسط سيطرة مطاوعيه على المنطقة كلها، فيكون الخادم الأوحد لجيوش الموت باسم الديمقراطية التي تحارب في بلده المطاوعي نفسه بكل شراسة ووحشية..

ولنتذكر جيدا، الوقوف صفا واحدا ضد هذا العاهل العميل، وضد كل تدخل خارجي أيا كان، لا يعني أبدا تغيير أيا منا لمواقفه مما يجري داخل سورية، ولا تراجع أي فرد أو جهة عن أحلامه وعمله من أجل سورية ديمقراطية وحرة وآمنة، اتفقنا على هذا التفصيل أو اختلفنا عليه، فهذا شأننا في بلدنا، نعمل من أجله في بلدنا، نموت أو نحيا في سبيله في بلدان.. 
وليس شأن مطاوع يتجرأ اليوم على التطاول على سورية الموغلة في التاريخ، والحالمة بالمستقبل.. 
تخاذلنا عن الوقوف صفا واحدا ضده، يعني أننا لسنا سوى عملاء للموت وللطائفية وللتقسيم وللتدمير…

عاهل الموت: أنت ومعلمتك كلينتون وسيدك ساركوزي ومدبرتك ميركل وغيركم: لن تجدوا سوى سلاحنا في صدوركم إذا جد الجد.. علق هذه النصيحة في أذنك المهترئة، فقد تنفعك يوما..

http://www.bassam-alkadi.com/content/view/629/44/

August 7th, 2011, 7:21 pm

 

newfolder said:

الكاتبة سمر يزبك تخاطب طائفتها العلوية: بشار الأسد قاتل وعائلته طاغية ومجرمة

Samar Yazbek addresses her ALawite community: Bashar is a killer and his family is criminal

http://www.alarabiya.net/articles/2011/08/07/161233.html

August 7th, 2011, 7:23 pm

 

ss said:

بسام القاضي
عاهل الموت هذا، حاضن المجرم العرعور ومجرمون كثر غيره، وراعي قناة الإجرام المسماة “العربية” التي حولت كل مفهوم للإعلام إلى تجارة موت بترويجها الكذب والنفاق والفبركة والتحريض المكشوف والعلني،

Syria will come out of this more stronger. The west, Saudi, Turkey, Kerriri Lebanon, Gulf states all together will not affect the regime plans to control this fake islamist driven uprise.

The west wants to cut the hands of Iran from the region and the expenses are paid off by the
عاهل الموت، حاضن المجرم العرعور
The plan is to attack Syria, corner HA, and blow off Iran’s influence. The trio knows that well and I am sure they have their own plans by now in case the NATO started to strike Syria, which in my opinion is unlikely.

The army continues its operation. I hear nothing from the thugs except the army is moving and controlling more and more pockets. Good Job. You made our Ramadan a wonderful one. God bless you all.

The west needs to understand that qaeda, and radicals will grow like a weed in a conservative society. The word conservative makes me sick.

August 7th, 2011, 7:38 pm

 

Aboud said:

@393 That river could be anywhere. It is highly illuminating that none of the surrounding countryside or recognizable landmarks were videoed.

@394 So, the only response the menhebaks have to the Saudi statement is “Shut your mouth you Wahabi?”

No wonder the regime is in the mess it’s in. What exactly does Bassam Al-Qadi find so objectionable to the very balanced, very humane Saudi statement.

Are the Saudis promoting one faction or group over another? No.

Are they arming anyone? Again no.

Are they trying to impose their own puppet? Nope.

All the Saudis did was express displeasure with the regime’s barbaric actions. If the regime can’t handle that, then it does not deserve to be in charge of Syria’s foreign affairs.

August 7th, 2011, 7:43 pm

 

Tara said:

Aboud

Bassam alkadi needs some democracy 101 course. He is saying if opposition does not condemn the Saudi statement, he would consider them traitors. So if they do not agree with his opinions, they are traitor. Typical Ba’ath influence.

August 7th, 2011, 7:54 pm

 

Tara said:

Article in #283 is a very read. “possible dawn of democracy in Syria”. Thx.

August 7th, 2011, 8:10 pm

 

ss said:

Saudi king himself is trying to play some pressure game here. He thought that the regime would have been history by now. That is not true king, the regime is here to stay. You paid a huge bill and it did not work. I guess your next bill would be for a NATO strike against Syria. Go for it!

Where are the armed thugs, are they out of business or what. It looks that the Syrian army is taking no chance to pick them one by one. I thought the regime will fall in Ramadan, at least this was the daily news by the opposition fellows. I see no signs of falling regime. I thought that there will be crack in the army; where is it????. How is your free 7 men made syrian army????we heard nothing of them. How are they doing….

August 7th, 2011, 8:10 pm

 

Aboud said:

@396 So that’s your new foreign policy plan? The Power of Positive Thinking?

Wow, for a moment there I actually thought the Baathists might have thought of a way out of this mess of their making.

That now makes Italy, Qatar and Saudi Arabia who have recalled their ambassadors. And yet the regime doesn’t dare recall any of its ambassadors. Pathetic.

“The west, Saudi, Turkey, Kerriri Lebanon,”

Who is Kerriri? Another one of junior’s numerous enemies? LOL! 🙂

August 7th, 2011, 8:13 pm

 

Norman said:

I want to tell the Gulf people, especially the ones that Syria liberated from Saddam Hussein,

If your house made of glass, do not throw stones on others.

August 7th, 2011, 8:14 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

الكاتبة السورية سمر يزبك تخاطب طائفتها العلوية: بشار الأسد قاتل وعائلته طاغية ومجرمة
الكاتب وطن
الأحد, 07 أغسطس 2011 21:21

نُقل عن الكاتبة السورية ، سمر يزبك، قولها أنه في الأيام الأولى للثورة “أحد الشباب الذين استشهدوا في درعا، وضعوه في البرّاد، وهو حي “براد القتلى”، ولما أخرجوا جثته، وجدوه قد كتب بدمه: “وضعوني هنا وأنا حيّ، سلامي لأمي”.

مرت الأيام ومشهد نزيف دم “الشاب الحي” انتقل من درعا إلى أرياف دمشق وحواضرها وإلى مدن سوريا بكاملها.رصاصٌ قتل الخوف، ولم يقتل الثورة، وصفت سمر يزبك، حقيقة مستخدميه، ورغم أنهم من نفس طائفتها إلا أنها وصفتهم بالقتلة والعصابات المجرمة،
وطالبت أبناء الطائفة بعدم التحول إلى وقود لنيران أشعلوها في مدن سوريا.
المتظاهرون نور سوريا
تشجع سمر يزبك في بداية كلمتها على الفيسبوك المتظاهرين فتقول “لو كان الإمام علي بن أبي طالب يعيش بيننا، لكان أول متظاهر فوق الأرض السورية الكريمة، ولرأيتم وجهه دامياً، المطالبون بالحق، والذين تمرغوا تحت أبواط العسكر والأمن، هم فكرة نور من وجه الحق الذي نادى به الإمام”.
تخشى الكاتبة غضب أهلها لكنها تجد من الضرورة تنبيههم وإيقاظهم فتقول: “أعرف كم سيغضبكم هذا الحديث، أعرف أنكم تبرأتم مني، الآن لم يعد هناك من مجال للوقوف بشكل حيادي تجاه ما يفعله النظام المستبد بكم، قراكم الفقيرة، ورجالكم الذين تحولوا إلى مرتزقة، ومثقفوكم الذي قضوا عمراً في سجون النظام، النظام المتمثل بعائلة طاغية تجعل منكم درعاً بشرياً لها، وتستمر في جبروتها وطغيانها، وتحرفكم عن مسار الحق الذي طالما سعيتم في الأرض، وتشردتم وذقتم عذابات لا هول لها من أجله”.
ولكي لا يربطوا الطائفة بالنظام، فالأولى باقية، بينما الثاني زائل من نظرها. وتتابع: “زوال العائلة المجرمة الحاكمة لا يعني زوالاً للطائفة. الطائفة أبقى، وأعز، يذهبون وتعيشون بين إخوتكم، لهم ما لكم، ولكم ما لهم، وعلى أسطر ثقافتكم وفلسفتكم تعلمت معنى أن نقول الحق، ولو على موتنا، ألم يدفع الإمام علي بن أبي طالب حياته ثمناً للحق؟”.
انظرو إلى الحقيقة
تطالب سمر أبناء “طائفتها” النظر إلى الحقيقة فتقول: “إلى متى لن تروا الحقيقة، وقد تحول الدم السوري إلى ماء؟ والعصابة الحاكمة التي جعلت من السوريين قتلى يتعفنون في الهواء الطلق ولا يدفنون، جعلت منكم آلات قتل لها”.
“أسامحكم لأني أعرف الألعاب الشيطانية التي مارسها النظام عليكم، والخوف الذي حولكم إلى تابعين، تُظلمون الآن أكثر مما ظلمتم في تاريخ إباداتكم والمذابح التي تعرضتم لها. لكن التاريخ لن يسامحكم. التاريخ سيقف ويشهد أنكم أنتم من عانيتم من القتل، تحولتم إلى قتلة، وإمامكم عندما خير بين أن يكون قاتلاً أو قتيلاً، اختار أن يكون قتيلاً”.
“لا تصدقوا الجلاد فيما يقوله، الطاغية واحد في التاريخ، يغير شكله، ولكن روحه تبقى، وقد خدعكم هذا الطاغية بلبوس الدين، وهو منه بريء، يدا الطاغية مغمستان بدماء أخوتكم في الوطن، بدماء السوريين، هو روح الطاغية التي قتلت الحسن والحسين”.
نظام القتل والإجرام
كمن يريد أن ينقذ أهله، تختم سمر يزبك خطابها: “انزعوا القشور التي زرعها نظام القتل والإجرام، واستعدوا للعودة إلى طهارتكم وطيبتكم وثقافتكم وأصلكم. وإن لم يحدث هذا، فقدت انتهيتم وانتهى معنى وجودكم الفلسفي والروحي، وذهب نوركم الأعلى إلى غير رجعة”.
على قائمة الشرف لم يكن انحرافاً عن الدرب ما قالته الكاتبة السورية، سمر يزبك، على الفيسبوك، فطالما عرف عنها الدخول في “المحرمات” عبر كتاباتها ورواياتها، لا سيما في “الصلصال” التي تحكي عن المؤسسة العسكرية في المجتمعات العقائدية والشمولية، وتشير فيها سمر يزبك بالترميز إلى شخصيات نافذة بالمجتمع السوري، كذلك فعلت في روايات أخرى وكتابات مستمرة لم تنقطع كنهر، يروي على طرفيه جذور نخوة سورية لا مثيل لها.
سجل حافل، ومواقف مشرفة، وضعت اسم الكاتبة سمر يزبك على لائحة الشرف التي تضم مؤيدين آخرين للثورة السورية مثل أصالة نصري، وسميح شقير، ومي سكاف، والمسرحيان ملص، ومحمد آل رشي وغيرهم ممن أكدوا أن الفن و الثقافة، التزام وليس تمثيلاً.

Read more: الكاتبة السورية سمر يزبك تخاطب طائفتها العلوية: بشار الأسد قاتل وعائلته طاغية ومجرمة http://www.watan.com/flash/2011-08-07-21-22-57.html#ixzz1UOM3vDR7

August 7th, 2011, 8:16 pm

 

NK said:

Bassan Kadi is a self-righteous narcissistic prick, all he does is throw accusations left and right. He pretty much insulted every single human being with an opinion about what is going on in Syria, even when that opinion is exactly inline with Bassam’s own views.

You can go through all his rants, he never once offered a solution to this crises, not one useful opinion, hell not even a positive thought, well I for one am sick and tired of his constant bickering and negativity.

August 7th, 2011, 8:18 pm

 

SYR.Expat said:

أردوغان للأسد بالعربية: من دَقّ دُقّ
الكاتب وطن
الأحد, 07 أغسطس 2011 22:54

أكدت مصادر مطلعة في الخارجية التركية أن أنقرة اتخذت موقفا سياسيا جديدا من الازمة السورية، يستند الى أنه «لا يمكن ترك النظام السوري يقوم بهذه الجرائم من قتل وتعذيب من دون محاسبة أو عقاب وأن الحكومة السورية ستحاسب، دوليا، على ما تفعله».

وتحدثت هذه المصادر الى «الحياة» غداة خروج رئيس الوزراء رجب طيب أردوغان عن صمته، مطلقا رسائل من العيار الثقيل في اتجاه دمشق.

وقال أردوغان، في حفلة افطار لاحدى مؤسسات التكافل الاجتماعي مساء اول من امس، أن بلاده صبرها نفد وتنتظر من دمشق انهاء العنف والعمليات العسكرية، معلنا ايفاد وزير خارجيته أحمد داود أوغلو الثلثاء الى دمشق «حاملا رسائل حازمة ونهائية. وسيتحدد موقف تركيا من الان وصاعدا وفق الرد السوري على تلك الرسائل».

واطلق أردوغان العنان لعواطفه من خلال الحديث عن حماة وما يحدث فيها قائلا إن بلاده «تابعت الازمة السورية عن كثب منذ بدايتها وسعت الى البحث عن سبل للمساعدة في حلها وتهدئتها، وما اذا كانت هناك في دمشق آذان تصغي للنصيحة». وأضاف: «لكننا اليوم وصلنا الى نهاية صبرنا. أي عقل وأي ضمير في العالم يقبل أن تعيش حماة مأساتها القديمة نفسها من جديد وفي شهر رمضان المبارك؟ هل يمكن أن يؤسس الانسان حكمه على ظلم الاخرين؟ الى متى يمكن حكم الناس داخل أقفاص حديدية و فولاذية؟».

وذكّر أردوغان الرئيس بشار الاسد بمصير الرئيس حسني مبارك، اذ قال: «كم من مسلم سيق الى حبل المشنقة من وراء تلك الاقفاص الحديدية. واليوم ترون أن من شنق هؤلاء يحضر الى محاكمته على سرير داخل القفص الذي وضعهم فيه سابقا. لدى العرب كلمة مشهورة، يقولون: من دَق دُق»، (قالها بالعربية).

وخلص الى مخاطبة المسؤولين السوريين بالقول: «الا ترون ما يحدث حولكم؟ الا تنتبهون الى ما يدور في العالم؟ من تظنون أنكم تفرحون عندما تفتحون النار على شعبكم؟». وفي هذا الاطار، قالت مصادر في الخارجية التركية «أنه من الغريب ألا تتعظ دمشق بما يحدث في المنطقة، ولا ترى أن الاصرار على الحلول الامنية لا يحل أزمتها بل يزيدها تعقيدا ويساعد على انهيار النظام».

وسألت «الحياة» المصادر عما يمكن لانقرة أن تتخذه من تدابير، واذا ما كان انشاء منطقة عازلة والتحضير لتدخل وفرض منطقة حظر جوي داخل سورية، فاجابت «أن كل شيء تم وضعه على الطاولة. لكن الوقت لم يحن بعد للحديث عن هذه التدابير تحديدا». واعادت الى الاذهان تجربة الرئيس العراقي السابق صدام حسين ومواجهته حصارا ومقاطعة اقتصادية، في اشارة الى التعاون التجاري والاقتصادي الكبير بين تركيا وسورية، ملمحة الى ان سوريا قد تواجه وضعا مماثلا في حال لم تؤد زيارة داود أوغلو لدمشق الى «نتائج ايجابية».

واعتبر قريب الى رئيس الوزراء التركي ان الرئيس بشار الاسد «خسر صديقا مهما وهو أردوغان، وأنه كان على الرئيس السوري أن يتنبه الى التغييرات التي تحصل في المنطقة وفي تركيا تحديدا»، ملاحظا ان «تركيا اليوم تسيطر على جيشها بشكل كامل مع قيادة عسكرية جديدة، ولها علاقات قوية مع الدول العربية والاتحاد الاوروبي وواشنطن، لذا كان على الاسد أن لا يشك في نصائح أنقرة لانها تدرك ما قد يؤول الامر اليه بسبب سياساته الحالية».

Read more: أردوغان للأسد بالعربية: من دَقّ دُقّ http://www.watan.com/news/2011-08-07-22-58-10.html#ixzz1UOMsyp6F

August 7th, 2011, 8:19 pm

 

syau said:

#397

The Saudi’s would do good to look in house and move on reforms to better the own land prior to even considering interfering in another countries internal affairs. Some suggestions would be

1-Abolish Sharia law
2-Scrap the draft branding political dissent an act of terror
3-Get your troops out of Bahrain
4-Allow women the right to drive
5-Recognise religious freedom
6-Implement laws to protect women from being harassed or ridiculed if they are seen without the traditional headdress in public
7-Allow women the right to be seen in public places without a male chaperone
8-Allow women the right to hold high political positions
9-Amend the ridiculous law that states all women have to have a male guardian
10-Stand united with Arab nations, not western powers

The list could go on and on, but for now, that is my response to the Saudi statement. They could also look to stop disrespecting Syria’s sovereignty.

Once these suggestions and many others are considered, people would be less likely to consider the Saudi statement a joke.

August 7th, 2011, 8:26 pm

 

Norman said:

SYAU,

Do Saudi women have the right to vote?, or you missed this one .

August 7th, 2011, 8:43 pm

 

syau said:

Norman,

That’s correct, Saudi women havn’t been granted the right to vote. They actually don’t have many, if any rights at all.

August 7th, 2011, 9:33 pm

 

atassi said:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaRjF95abc4&feature=share
MEET THE !!SOME OF THE SYRIACOMMENT !!A and Aldoinia

Haaaaaaa.. meet the new .Al Sahaf’s

August 7th, 2011, 9:35 pm

 

beaware said:

Sunday, August 7, 2011
Sibel Utku Bila
ANKARA – Hürriyet Daily News
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=erdogan-sends-turkish-fm-to-up-pressure-on-syria-2011-08-07
PM Erdoğan’s statement that Ankara’s patience with Syria is running out draws a harsh response from Damascus ahead of a visit by the Turkish foreign minister
‘The process from now on will take shape according to the response [al-Assad] will give and the practices on the ground,’ Erdoğan said Saturday.

‘The process from now on will take shape according to the response [al-Assad] will give and the practices on the ground,’ Erdoğan said Saturday.

Turkey is set to deliver a final warning to Syria that it must end the bloodshed sweeping the country and introduce reforms or Ankara will join international measures against the regime, officials said Sunday.

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu will go to Damascus on Tuesday to deliver this warning following the harshest reaction yet from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan to the deadly unrest sweeping Syria. Erdoğan said Saturday that Ankara’s patience with the situation was running out and that Davutoğlu would convey “a resolute message” to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad that he risks losing Turkey’s support.

Damascus hit back Sunday, adding to the bilateral chill ahead of the visit, but a Turkish Foreign Ministry official said Davutoğlu’s visit would go ahead barring a last-minute change.

If Davutoğlu “is to deliver a firm message to Syria, he will hear a firmer reply regarding the Turkish stance, which didn’t condemn the brutal killings and crimes committed by armed terrorist groups against civilians, the military and police members till now,” Syrian presidential advisor Bouthina Shaaban said, according to the official Sana news agency.

“Syria has always welcomed consultation among friends, but it categorically rejects all regional or international attempts of interference in its internal affairs,” Shaaban added.

The outcome of Davutoğlu’s meeting with al-Assad will determine the course of Turkish policy vis-a-vis Syria, Turkish officials said, signaling that Ankara has come close to abandoning the Syrian president and considering international measures that may lead to his “Saddam-like” isolation.

“The process from now on will take shape according to the response [al-Assad] will give and the practices on the ground,” Erdoğan said Saturday. “Our patience is running thin… We do not see the Syria issue as an external one. It is an internal issue for us. We share a border of 850 kilometers, we have kinship, historical and cultural ties and … we cannot just watch what is happening there.”

Davutoğlu “is going [to Damascus] to deliver a warning … a very sharp message,” a senior diplomat who asked not to be named told the Hürriyet Daily News, dismissing reforms announced by Damascus so far as “a few minor things.”

Toward a Saddam-like isolation?

“[Turkey and Syria] will sit down and talk for one last time … even though one should not exclude dialogue even in wartime,” another Foreign Ministry official said. “The talks will show whether the ties will be cut loose or not … If a new [Turkish] policy is to be outlined on Syria – that’s the last meeting.”

The official stressed that Turkey’s position would influence the course of international action against Damascus.

“The situation here is not like the one in Libya. No one can do anything on Syria without Turkey… I don’t think that military action against Syria is likely but the process may lead to an embargo, isolation and a Saddam [Hussein]-like situation” for al-Assad, he said.

Thus far, Ankara has stopped short of calling for al-Assad’s departure, arguing that a democratic transition should take place under his leadership.

By turning against al-Assad, Turkey would face deterioration in ties with its southern neighbor, which had flourished in recent years. The turmoil has already hit trade links between the two countries and led to an exodus to Turkey of thousands of Syrians fleeing bloodshed in their country.

In a gloomy reminder to al-Assad, Erdoğan on Saturday made a veiled reference to fallen Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak, who recently appeared before a Cairo court, confined to a cage and lying on a stretcher.

“Those who sent scores of Muslims to the gallows are not up on their feet now and look where they are going on a stretcher … Those who do not learn a lesson will suffer,” Erdoğan said.

“What mind, what conscience would accept the repetition of great suffering in that wounded city on a Ramadan day? Whom are you making happy by spraying your people with bullets?” the Turkish prime minister said, referring to a deadly Syrian security crackdown on the city of Hama during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Also Saturday, both Erdoğan and Davutoğlu held talks in Istanbul with Walid Jumblutt, the leader of Lebanon’s Druze community, to discuss developments in Syria and the region, the Anatolia news agency reported.

August 7th, 2011, 9:51 pm

 

beaware said:

Turkey sends a message to Syria that Britain cannot
http://www.u.tv/News/Turkey-sends-a-message-to-Syria-that-Britain-cannot/3cbc52ea-9adb-438f-8952-15cbee05cf7a
Simon Tisdall: Syrian visit by the Turkish foreign minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, has the appearance of a showdown – but President Bashar al-Assad might listen

The foreign secretary, William Hague, admitted last week there was not much more Britain could do to halt the Syrian crackdown, while his US counterpart, Hillary Clinton, has been reduced to counting the dead.

But Turkey, Syria’s more powerful neighbour, is less supine. It is sending its foreign minister to Damascus on Tuesday to read the riot act to Syria’s gore-soaked president, Bashar al-Assad.

Ahmet Davutoglu’s visit comes against a backdrop of daily atrocities by a regime struggling to contain the uprising. At least 20 civilians died on Sunday in army attacks on the eastern town of Deir Ezzor, activists said. Deaths were also reported in Houleh in central Syria. Belated promises from the regime of free, multiparty elections appear to have done nothing to defuse the crisis, which has claimed 1,600 lives since March.

Turkish alarm, bordering on anger, is humanitarian and strategic in nature. A summer cross-border surge of Syrian refugees has caused big headaches for Ankara. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s prime minister, pictured right, is said to be furious that his personal pleas to Assad to stop butchering his people and adopt substantive reforms have been ignored. Erdogan has publicly condemned the regime’s “savagery”.

But Turkey is also worried by the impact of the unrest on its efforts to suppress Kurdistan Workers’ party (PKK) fighters active in the south-east of the country, many of whom are Syrian-born or based in Syria. A report by the National Intelligence Organisation (NIT), obtained by Today’s Zaman newspaper, says about 1,500 PKK fighters in the Kandil mountains region, straddling Turkey, Iraq, Syria and Iran, are of Syrian origin.

The report’s complaint that Syria is not co-operating adequately with Turkish anti-terrorism efforts recalls the 1990s, when Syria provided safe haven for the PKK, hosted its now jailed leader, Abdullah Ocalan, and the two countries almost went to war amid other disputes about water resources and territory. Relations have since improved but those gains are rapidly dissipating.

Iran’s refusal to share intelligence about its own anti-Kurd operations and its tightening links with the Syrian regime are another cause of Turkish concern. Davutoglu confirmed on Friday that an Iranian arms shipment to Syria had been intercepted, supposedly destined for Hezbollah in Lebanon. A Syria-bound planeload of Iranian automatic rifles, rocket launchers and mortars was seized in March.

As Assad has grown more isolated, his alliance with Tehran has gained greater importance – and become more worrying for Turkey, whose attempts to act as a go-between with Iran and western countries, for example on the nuclear issue, have irritated both sides and achieved no appreciable progress.

Against this backdrop, Davutoglu’s Damascus visit has taken on the appearance of a showdown. “We have been very patient until now, waiting to see … whether they will listen to what we have been saying … But our patience is running out now,” Erdogan said at the weekend.

What happens in Syria was an “internal affair” for Turkey, he said, given shared historical and cultural ties, and an 850km (530-mile) common border. “We cannot remain a bystander.”

Speculation is rife that if rebuffed again, Turkey may consider punitive steps ranging from diplomatic and economic measures targeting the regime to the setting up of some kind of safe haven inside northern Syria policed by the Turkish military. If such a risky intervention were undertaken, Turkey would be within its rights, following the Libyan model, to call on fellow Nato members, including Britain, for support.

Turkey’s determination to beard Assad in his lair comes amid growing Arab criticism of Syria, reflected in the Gulf Co-operation Council’s weekend call for an end to the use of “excessive force” and the pursuit of “serious reform”. Last week, Russia, a traditionally protective ally, backed a condemnatory UN security council statement. President Dmitry Medvedev warned Assad he would meet a “sad fate” if he did not change course.

All of which suggests Hague’s appeal to regional and non-western governments to do more to pressure Assad has been heard. It highlights a probable, recurring 21st-century theme. Where Britain and the US increasingly cannot or will not act, others take the lead – and may do better.

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2011

Also

Syria reverts to ’90s, Iran abandons Turkey in terror struggle
http://www.todayszaman.com/news-252871-syria-reverts-to-90s-iran-abandons-turkey-in-terror-struggle.html

August 7th, 2011, 10:05 pm

 

Abughassan said:

I was able to talk to two Syrians who just came back from Syria. There was few discrepancies between their stories but the following seem to be an acceptable version of what they said (they do not claim to represent all Syrians but I found them to be right at the middle):
1. Sectarian tension is very high and underreported,and a lot of it is caused by
ordinary Syrians and not just the regime (who in my opinion has only itself to blame)
2. A big chunk of the army units that entered Banyas and Aljisr were Sunni officers. No info from Hama to compare.
3. Support for Asad in aldair is not as weak as reported.
4. My info that Bashar may be taking a back seat was challenged by both
5. Albaath leadership is getting ready for a new era,a large section of baathis are leaving or about to leave the party.
6. The regime,is not likely to be toppled anytime soon (many would agree)
7. My story,or theory,about the army taking over the government seems as a remote possibility according to these two friends.
8. The hawks on both sides are winning and that will be translated into more bloodshed unless an out-of-the blue political break thru mixes all cards again.
What makes this couple different is their diverse background and lack of commitment to one side (one is secular and both are well-off).
Nobody should draw too many conclusions from their testimonies,I just wanted to share them with you.

August 7th, 2011, 10:07 pm

 

Tara said:

Syau and Norman

Come on now. Saudi women are not as privileged as the Syrian women. We are privileged of being gunned down by the security forces when demonstrating looking for sons and husbands. Remember Banyas older woman who was gunned down and her denture fell off. Please, as regime supporters, you have no ground to talk about women’ rights.

August 7th, 2011, 10:09 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Tara, well said!

August 7th, 2011, 10:16 pm

 

atassi said:

Please be frank, what are you really supporting in this regime? I can tell from your writing that you are educated and smart, but can you tell us what are taking to suppress your intelligence!!! I am kind of mystified by your actions…

August 7th, 2011, 10:21 pm

 

Darryl said:

Regarding the thread about discrimination in Syria:

The discrimination at the Ottomans times was greatest against Alawites first then the Christians. In Wadi Alnasara, it was entire towns that were forced to convert to Islam, and Alawite towns were treated like piles of cow dung.

The other major force of discrimination occurred also, although never mentioned for obvious reasons, during the era when Syria was going from one failed union to another and then finally was hitched in a marriage to Egypt under that incompetent Jamal Abdul-Nasser who was full of hot air.

Abdul-Nasser caused mass chaos in Syria by purging most of the minorities from the army and government positions. The Syrians were high and euphoric from all his useless speeches and he managed to reduce the Syrian economy to a standstill and steal Syria’s wealth to feed Egypt. This of course resulted in over throwing the regime that supported the union.

There was a joke in Syria at the time that God hated Abdul-Nasser so much that it stopped raining in Syria and farming failed. There was another joke too, if you wanted to be president of Syria, just get up before the roosters croak at dawn. Syria was a complete joke of a nation back then, even tiny Lebanon had more political and economic clout than Syria, a Lebanese Lira was worth over two Syrian Liras in those days. Do you know who fashioned Syria to be what it is today?

It is a pity that he was a minority (Alawite and yes he made mistakes) and like Antoon Saadeh, Michel Afleq and other Minorities like Zeki Al-Arsuzi, if they were Sunni Muslims, people might treat them with more respect and follow their lead.

August 7th, 2011, 10:29 pm

 

mjabali said:

Abu Umar Comment #381

Again you did not understand what I am talking about. You apparently suffer from قلة الاستيعاب.

You do not understand what I write in plain language.

You insist on asking me about Ali ibn Abi Talib, Was he relevant to my post # 323, in which I am talking about justice for the Alawis?

In your mind set the Alawis are going to Hell and you would love to kill as many of them to speed that process. You are a criminal plain and simple.

What you said has nothing to do with the topic me and Sheila were talking about.

You did not understand what the conversation was about and started asking me questions about another topic, I told you that you can not understand what I write in plain language. You are a fanatic and fanatics’ vision is always not clear. You are focused on hate.

I was talking about the decrees/fatawi of your hero the WAR CRIMINAL Ibn Taymiyah and how these decrees are still followed up till today and that is a shame on you. Shame on you when you follow a text that ask you to kill others because they are different from you. Shame on you if you keep running away when you are asked about the rights of Muslim minorities, Christians and Jews. You are nothing but a prophet of hate.

Ali Ibn Abi Talib did not issue any decree that we know of to kill others. I asked you before to get us a text and you ran away. Where is that text? I asked you about before and when I did you ran away? You are a deserter and can not fight the real battles.

Ibn Taymiyah is a criminal and we are going to put him on trial if you like it or not.

You and everyone who support this criminal is going to be put on trial.

Ibn Taymiyah is the essence of the criminal mind set of all of you Salafis, and we are going to put you on the spot to defend your hero the war criminal.

Ibn Taymiyah’s words are in the mind of every Salafi goon all over the earth.

Ibn Taymiyah’s words are the reason many innocent people are losing their lives all over the earth.

WE ARE GONNA EXPOSE HIM BIG TIME so prepare yourself.

By the way, You ran away from the last battle and now you are trying to poke me so I would SMASH your weak argument AGAIN, you must be a masochist as obvious Mr. Abu Umar.

I advise you to pick on someone from your league mr. Abu Umar.

August 7th, 2011, 10:33 pm

 

beaware said:

How 10,000 Protestors Multiply Overnight to be 500,000
The Hama Affair
August 4, 2011
By PIERRE PICCININ
http://www.counterpunch.org/piccinin08042011.html
This July, I travelled to Syria, with the purpose of finding out for myself the origins of the present political conflict.

I was able to roam the country at liberty, from Dera, Damascus, Homs, Hama, Maraat-an-Numan, Jisr-al-Shigur, on the Turkish border, even Deir-ez-Sor, all places where the media had signalled outbursts of violence.

I was able to witness the different internal struggles, some of which were violent and had completely different objectives from those of the democratic pacifists. The Muslim Brotherhood, for example, seeks to bring about an Islamic republic, which in turn terrifies the Christians and most other minorities.

Yet, outside the scope of my research, I was surprised that the image of Syria, portrayed by the Western media as a country undergoing full scale revolution, does not correspond in any way whatsoever to the reality of the situation.

Indeed, the large-scale protest movements have run out of steam, this due in part to the repression, so that these days the protests only number a few hundred at most, usually focused around mosques, bearing the mark of Islamist influence.

Therefore, it is only in the city of Hama, cultural stronghold of the Muslim Brotherhood, under a state of siege, that full scale protests are to be found.

Centre of a violent revolt, in 1982, which was crushed by Hafez al-Assad, father of the incumbent President, Hama is today surrounded by heavy armor. This said, the government have decided against a bloodbath, for fear of repercussions from the international community.

On Friday 15 July, I entered Hama. Very quickly I found myself surrounded by the youths in control. Upon presenting my Belgian passport the situation calmed down: ‘Belgicaa! Belgicaa!’; as the only foreign observer on the ground, they escorted me through the protestors. The highlight of which was reaching the top of a high rise, from which I took a series of snapshots, revealing the extent of the debacle.

On Asidi square, at the bottom of the large El-Alamein Avenue, prayer had finished, to the sound of thousands of people appearing from all across the city, uniting under a shout of defiance ‘Allah Akbar!’

That same night on July 15, I received news feeds from the AFP announcing a million protestors all over Syria, of which 500,000 in Hama alone.

In Hama however, they could not have been more than 10,000.

This ‘information’ was even more absurd due to the fact that the city of Hama counts only 370,000 inhabitants.

Of course, there will always be a margin of error and numbers do vary with sources, estimations are never quite so straightforward.

Yet, in this case, it was not a simple estimation: this is blatant disinformation, propaganda at its finest. 500,000 protestors can shake the very foundations of a regime, 10,000 however are of no consequence.

Furthermore, all the ‘information’ regarding the Syrian situation has been twisted similarly for months now.

So what sources does AgenceFrancePresse (AFP) cite?

The same which crops up systematically throughout the media and has now become a monopoly in its own right, regarding the Syrian protests: the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR).

Behind this superficial veneer of respectability and professionalism, hides a political organisation based in London, its president none other than Rami Abdel Raman, a man who has consistently sided against the Baath regime, who is loosely linked to the Muslim Brotherhood.

Therefore, for many months now, the Western media have diffused an edited reality, corrected by a single source which nobody has deemed it necessary, it seems, to question.

This portrayal of a Syria in full scale revolution and of a Baath party on the brink do not correspond in any way whatsoever to the reality of the situation; that the government hold control and what is left of the protests have in effect splintered and become considerably marginalized.

However, the consequences of this latest case of disinformation regarding Syria are far reaching: the lessons of Timisoara, the Gulf War or events in Yugoslavia haven’t been learned. Still, European media continue to be lured into basing reports on loosely assembled news reports and risk depicting a virtual reality for their readers/viewers.

Yet, when the media fail their duty of assembling genuine information, it is democracy itself which is in danger.

Pierre Piccinin is a professor of history and political science in Brussels.

August 7th, 2011, 10:34 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Atassi,you are reading too much into my posts. This is a forum and it is natural to see and hear views that you and I may not support. My position on Bashar and albaath is final and is not based on emotions or personal interests,however,I disagree with efforts to demonize the army or push political Islam down Syrians’ throat. The opposition is well advised to accept little dissent in its ranks instead of risking continuous fragmentation and loss of support from potential sympathizers. I am on board with Bashar resignation and ending albaath domination of political life along with the hegemony of the security forces,otherwise,I reserve my right to disagree with some of you on other issues.
Take my advice if you are politically active,I am not,do not scare away people like me if you find them in Syria,and you will see many Syrians who share my beliefs and grievances.

August 7th, 2011, 10:35 pm

 

N.Z. said:

I fully agree on most of the points you mentioned, except the first and last. “The hawks on both sides are winning” you mean the government and the opposition.

If that’s what you meant, I will tell you, some people never change. Specially those who keeps themselves in the middle. They can oscillate easily.

August 7th, 2011, 10:36 pm

 

Norman said:

Tara,

Saudi Arabia will be better with you there and Syria will not miss you, so take a leap of faith and move there,

August 7th, 2011, 10:40 pm

 

syau said:

Tara #413,

As a supporter of this terrorist revolution, therefore a supporter of murders and mutilations, massacres against security personnel, mutilations in the streets, public hangings, also a supporter of sanctions which affect the Syrian people, a supporter of collapsing the Syrian economy, what makes you think you have the right to tell people what they have the right to discuss?

I’m sure Saudi Arabia will welcome you with open arms, considering you wear the niqab, don’t mind not voting or going out in public on your own. Enjoy the countries scenery from your lounge room.

August 7th, 2011, 10:45 pm

 
 

mjabali said:

The Saudi King became vocal when some of his extended tribe came under attack in Eastern Syria.

Saudi Arabia is a place out of the middle ages and the last place on earth someone could give an advice to someone especially about human rights.

Women has no rights in Saudi Arabia and still some women on this message board are welcoming the speech of the Saudi king who is married to probably 50 women.

The Saudi King does not talk about how he treats the Shia in the Eastern Province and how he and his family been stealing the oil of the Shia and using it for bad things all over the world.

On what does Saudi Arabia use its wealth? The answer is to spread the Wahabi ideas. Any doubts about this.

Saudi Arabia is the biggest dispenser of hatred all over the world.

The Saudi king should be talking about how he is going to develop his country and give his people some human rights.

Saudia Arabia is a kingdom of darkness.

Saudia Arabia used their money, they steal from the Shia, to fight the Shia to divert the attention from their squandering the wealth of their people and from their corruption.

Saudia Arabia is a hell hole.

Saudia Arabia is where the hate TV like Wisal grows and grows.

Saudia Arabia is where the most violent literature is produced with the help of the government.

Saudia Arabia is the land of hate.

When is going to be the day where we find a modern law and human rights in Saudia Arabia? When is the day when we gonna see democracy in Saudia Arabia?

Syrians should be aware of the danger anything comes from Saudia Arabia. Look at all of those Syrian men who went to work in Saudia Arabia and got brainwashed and became Wahabis.

Saudia Arabia is the reason of most of the evils in the Middle East.

August 7th, 2011, 10:50 pm

 

jad said:

Why don’t you Queen Tara and your friend MB Princess Dudi send some flowers to your new boyfriend Abdul in KSA as a thank you for his almighty BS statement and to show him your fond of KSA democratic system, it’s high status on Shia and women rights.
Instead of whining and be-aching about Alkadi article, why don’t you write an article and show us your writing talents away from making up stories and attacking every person on SC that doesn’t fit your Gucci club.

آخر قصائد سمر يزبك المنشورة : عرعورة انا سيدي
http://filkkaisrael.blogspot.com/2011/08/blog-post_7932.html

August 7th, 2011, 10:56 pm

 

atassi said:

Abughassan,
I am reading well, and I agree with your thoughts.. currently I see two the feasible solutions, Basher leave in an orderly fashion with the help of all external power, or we will be witnessing Bashar hanging about his current course and bringing down the house on everyone head..

August 7th, 2011, 10:56 pm

 

Tara said:

Norman and Syau

Norman, again you are restoring to infantile statements. Sorry Norman but you could do better.

Syau, I am not disappointed by your answer. I don’t have any right to tell you what to discuss, nor do you have the same right. You keep discussing. I wanted to give you a reminder in case you guys forgot. I am not interested in KSA. Their fashion statement not exactly mine. But like to remind you, I never voted in my life living in Syria, remember?

August 7th, 2011, 11:01 pm

 

N.Z. said:

Norman,

Like it or hate it, if it was not for Saudi Arabia and the gulf states, allowing Arabs to work, were many prospered, from all faith and different walks of life, we will have become worse than Africa.

We need them more than they need us. Remember when our macho Jr. called them half men? Yet they did not react or took avenge on Syrian. This we can never forget.

Expats pay no taxes, they spend or send money to their relatives in their respective countries.

No country is perfect, however, compare them to the leaders of Libya, a very rich Arab country, the cray man treated foreigner like hell. Or the Kuwaiti and his avenge on Palestinians…

If anything we are the least to criticize others, when we have a tyrant who knows only how to mass murder hispeople.

August 7th, 2011, 11:01 pm

 

atassi said:

Syau you !!:-) …..haaa

August 7th, 2011, 11:02 pm

 

Ss said:

426 Attasi,

He will not bring the house on our head or yours. He is simply bringing the house on the heads of criminals. If you have sympathy for these criminals then I hope the building will fall on your head as well. I see no signs of weakness, the regime is determined to restore order. Ramadan is not your round, sorry

August 7th, 2011, 11:18 pm

 

Tara said:

Jad

Are you skipping posts? In case you did, I will re explain. I am not a fan of KSA or king Abdul as you called him. I am for Arab spring in KSA and I am very much for Shiaa rights in Bahrain so no flower for king Abdul from me. He does not impress me. Having said that, I welcome any added pressure on Besho to stop killing and torturing my people.

August 7th, 2011, 11:19 pm

 

Abughassan said:

Where is this love for the Saudi regime coming from?
Arabs are not treated better than other “foreigners” in Saudi Arabia,actually,two doctors holding the same degree are paid differently based on their national origin, with the Arab guy getting paid less,almost always .
Some of the most hateful and downright criminal Fatwas come from Saudi Arabia. Their religious establishment,as it is now,is not an asset to the Muslim world,it is a disease.
Saudi Arabia is a country with oppressed population,especially minorities,and a lot of oil money that gets wasted on the royal family and weapons that are not needed and will not be used,and what is left is given to saudis as a “gift” from khadem alharamayn !!
The presence of the holy Kaaba in Saudi Arabia is a test to its rulers,we may disagree if they passed it,I do not think they did.
I would not live there even if they double my salary,others are free to praise KSA as much as they want,for me,I can not wait for a Saudi Spring ..

August 7th, 2011, 11:24 pm

 

NK said:

Abughassan

Could you please add some perspective into your two friends’ testimonies, are they Baathists ? where did they stay during their visit to Syria ? how credible is their info regarding what’s going on among the Baath leadership ?

Thanks for sharing.

August 7th, 2011, 11:34 pm

 

Abughassan said:

None is baathist but one is undecided when it comes to regime change . The other shares most of my ideas. The areas they visited were dair alzour,Damascus,Aleppo and tartous. They are both Sunni but one is married to a Christian ,not that it matters to me. In the past,I found them to be objective but their fear of a civil war is overwhelming and they are particularly afraid of a total collapse of law and order if this mess persists. I never said I would take their stories as a final verdict.

August 7th, 2011, 11:51 pm

 

NK said:

Abughassan

Thanks, I actually went through the same phase of fear from the unknown and a possible power vacuum, so I can probably relate to their dilemma. For me the turning point was the brutality the regime used in Daraa and how poorly BtB managed the crisis from that point onward. Anyways, the reason I asked is, with the amount of disinformation going around testimonies of people on the ground are simply priceless regardless of their own political views. I consider you trustworthy enough to relay the information without distortion. Again thanks for sharing.

August 8th, 2011, 12:11 am

 

Real Syrian said:

The speech of King ABDULLAH about freedom reminds us with the prostitute which defends her honor…..This guy almost doesn’t know to read and even if he can , he is not able to decide what to say…………..His speech is a kind of fun and joke…He doesn’t even deserve to be considered as an important event as everybody knows that the dirty Saudi involvement in the Syrian affairs exceeds such garbage coming from the mouth of this Bedawii Bugger.

August 8th, 2011, 12:18 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

So it looks that Alassi is not dry after all,the crew of farters in SC is not a shamed,it is just another fart.pony tail is the leader of that team,he swears that he saw Alassi dry while he was posting his comment from above a tree next to Alassi.The bodies removed from the river today showed that the government was saying the truth and that Abood,Tara,and Revlon were lying.

August 8th, 2011, 12:26 am

 

majedkhaldoon said:

Tara
They accuse you of MB member,even that you condemn MB.
they accuse you of loving the system in KSA,even that you call for arab spring against the king of Saudia.
They accuse the protesters of being armed, they obviously are not
they accuse the revolution of being terrorist,even that they are freedom seekers.
they acuse that the protesters have infiltrators(Mundasseen),there is none.
They accuse the revolution as dominated by MB they are totally wrong.
they accuse us of being against the resistance, while they dont fight Israel, and they support giving concessions to Israel with nothing in return.
they accuse the demonstrators of killing army soldiers,while their criminals are killing those who refuse to shoot at their fellow syrians.

All their weapons are acusation, false accusations they never told the truth.

Jumblat was in Turkey, met with officials, returned to praise Turkey, King Abdullah statement,and Erdogan statement,and Russia warning and europe and USA messages,they all are major events the regime in return declare war against its people and in Ramadan,all indicate that the regime is soon dying.

August 8th, 2011, 12:42 am

 

Syria no kandahar said:

Tara &The Angel
Alaaroor Angel appeared to Tara while she was sleeping in the state tonight.
Alaaroor:Tara Tara Tara you are in big trouble.
Tara:who are you.
A:I am Alaaroor angel.
T: what can I do for you
A:listen Tara We were talking about you me and god,and we were discussing your status last night,I did not put a good word for you.
T:why for heavens sake?
A:don’t act stupid Tara,remember when you told SNK that you don’t like me,how can any good Sunni dislike me?
T:Aroori,common you believe that moran.
A:I read every comment in Syria comment.
T:you do.
A: yes,you know the kid Aboodi, I am so proud of him,he works with me now.
T: he does.
A:yes,he helps me out grinding people.he also is good in lying,whenever I get in trouble with god, he starts his stupid jokes, and his hehehe so god gets us both out,and I get out of trouble.any way back to you,you have very good record with our jihadist team,but your file have few negative things.
T: like what?
A: you hate me,and I don’t stand that.also by Revlon standards you are hijabless meaning topless.
T: it is ok I am never perfect.
A: so then we have to talk about my grinding machine
T: you are out of your mind,I am Sunni.I know very well about your machine,SNK was always talking about it.but my understanding it is for Alawis and Christians .
A: don’t mention that SNK name again,I just finished grinding him.
T:so can I leave now I got go.
A:nop. I have special order to hind you.
T:son lets be clear,you will be grinding a Sunni woman.
A:absolutely,I have to clean my machine first,because I don’t want to contaminate Sunni flesh with Alawi or Christian ones.
B:please have mercy on me,I don’t hate you.
A:too late,let me call my assistance:Abooooodiiiiiiii
Aboodi:yes master.
T:Aboodi that is you,save me pease
Aboodi:hehehe hahaha hohoho
A: aboodi,my ooh Sunni boy plug the grinder.
Aboodi:sure master I love doing this.
The grinding machine goes vzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Tara screams nooooooooooooooooooo
She opens her eyes.drinks water,and thinks: I was so wrong in supporting these guys.

August 8th, 2011, 1:11 am

 

Darryl said:

428. N.Z. said:

Norman,

Like it or hate it, if it was not for Saudi Arabia and the gulf states, allowing Arabs to work, were many prospered, from all faith and different walks of life, we will have become worse than Africa.

Yeb NZ, that glorious and tolerant KSA and gulf states where all the refugees from Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon (in the past) are fleeing too so that they can escape the economic hard life in leaky boats.

Darn, what the hell am I thinking here, their coming in the leaky boats to Australia not the that beacon of freedom, Arabian peninsula!

August 8th, 2011, 2:40 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

Abu Ghassan, please choose your side. I do not doubt you, but most of your “sources” are very dubious. I guess thats because of your fasmily and friends, most of the, belong to that social background who have prospered under the regime or who have some stake in the regime 9or are afraid of “majoroty rule”). So I would kindly suggest not putting your “sources” views here on SC and offend us all. people are dying for God’s sake. 50 ppl died in Deirezzor yesterday. I ma yet to hear a word of sympathy from you. Our blood is boiling.

@the other Iranians on this forum –

If you guys accept Abu Bakr, Omar and Otnman as righful Caliphs, then all our quarrels and troubles will stop.

August 8th, 2011, 3:46 am

 

syau said:

SNK,

That was hilarious! hehehe hahaha hohoho….

August 8th, 2011, 3:46 am

 

SYR.Expat said:

سورية وتثوير شيعة الخليج
عبد الباري عطوان
2011-08-07

بعد اقل من يوم من البيان الذي اصدره مجلس التعاون الخليجي، وانتقد فيه الاستخدام المفرط للقوة من قبل السلطات السورية في حق مواطنيها المطالبين بالاصلاح والتغيير الديمقراطي، وبعد خمسة اشهر من اعمال المواجهات والقتل، دعت الجامعة العربية هذه السلطات الى الوقف الفوري لكافة اعمال العنف والحملات الأمنية ضد المدنيين، حفاظاً على الوحدة الوطنية للشعب السوري، وحقناً لدماء المدنيين والعسكريين، ومنع التدخلات الاجنبية.
اللافت ان هذين البيانين جاءا بعد ايام من صدور بيان مماثل عن مجلس الامن الدولي، والتحذير الذي اصدره رئيس الوزراء الروسي فلاديمير بوتين الى الرئيس السوري بشار الاسد، وقال فيه إنه يسير في طريق خطر باعتماده على الحلول الامنية واراقة دماء شعبه، وبعد صرخة رئيس الوزراء التركي رجب طيب اردوغان التي قال فيها ان صبر بلاده قد نفد، وكشف عن عزمه ارسال وزير خارجيته السيد احمد داوود اوغلو الى دمشق ‘الثلاثاء’ حاملا رسالة شديدة اللهجة في هذا الصدد.
الرد الرسمي السوري على جميع هذه البيانات والتحذيرات جاء اكثر دموية من كل الردود السابقة المماثلة، فقد قتلت قوات الجيش والامن السورية حوالى 66 شخصا في هجماتها التي شنتها امس بالدبابات والمدرعات على مدينتي دير الزور وحمص، بينما استمرت في حصار مدينة حماة، وواصلت عمليات التمشيط داخلها، ورقم الضحايا مرشح للارتفاع مع تقدم ساعات الليل.
السلطات السورية اعربت عن ‘اسفها’ لصدور بيان مجلس التعاون الخليجي ولهجته القوية، وعدم اشارته الى الهجمات التي يشنها مسلحون ضد قواتها، تصفهم بأنهم ‘ارهابيون’ ينتمون الى حركات اسلامية متطرفة، تهدف الى زعزعة استقرار البلاد كمقدمة لاطاحة النظام.
هذا ‘الاستئساد’ من قبل مجلس التعاون الخليجي لم يأت من فراغ، ولا بد ان هناك ‘طبخة ما’ يجري اعدادها في الغرف المغلقة، دفعت بدول المجلس الى اصدار هذا البيان فجأة، وهي التي حرصت طوال الاشهر الخمسة الماضية على ‘مغازلة’ النظام السوري، وارسال الوفود للتضامن معه، دون ان تتوقف في الوقت نفسه عن توظيف آلتها الاعلامية الفضائية الجبارة في خدمة الجماعات السورية المعارضة، لفضح الممارسات الدموية التي تجري على الارض، وبلغ هذا التوظيف ذروته اثناء اقتحام دبابات الجيش السوري مدينة حماة وقتل حوالى مئتين من ابنائها في اقل من يومين.
من الواضح ان هناك عوامل عديدة دفعت الى خروج هذا البيان الخليجي المدعوم ببيان آخر من الجامعة العربية، ابرزها ضخامة اعداد الشهداء الذين سقطوا من جراء تكثيف السلطات السورية لهجمتها الامنية والعسكرية، وتزايد الضغوط الداخلية، اي من قبل الشعوب الخليجية ومؤسساتهم الدينية خاصة، على الحكومات للخروج عن صمتها واتخاذ مواقف داعمة للانتفاضة الشعبية، وتزايد انتقادات المعارضة السورية لهذا الصمت العربي والخليجي عامة، تجاه هذه المذابح.
***
وقد يجادل البعض بان هذه الحكومات الخليجية التي اكتشفت فجأة نعمة الاصلاح واهميتها، وباتت تلح على نظيرتها السورية لتطبيقها، هي الاكثر حاجة لتطبيقه، وكان الاجدر بها ان تبدأ به بنفسها تجاوبا مع مطالب شعوبها ‘المؤدبة’ حتى الآن، وهذا جدل ينطوي على بعض الصحة. فالحكومات الخليجية تدرك هذه الحقيقة وتتجاهلها، كما تجاهلتها لعقود نظيراتها العربيات الاخريات، ولكنها اصدرت بيانها هذا مكرهة او مضطرة، لتحويل انظار شعوبها الى هدف خارجي، اي سورية، وامتصاص بوادر نقمة شعبية تتكشف تحت الرماد.
صحيح ان الحكومات الخليجية، وبفضل ما حباها الله به من ثروات هائلة، لا تواجه انتفاضات شعبية تضطر الى اللجوء للوسائل القمعية بمواجهتها، على غرار ما حدث في سورية وتونس واليمن ومصر، ولكن علينا ان نتذكر امرين مهمين، الاول ان البحرين وهي دولة خليجية واجهت احتجاجات غاضبة تطالب بالاصلاح، ادت الى تدخل قوات سعودية لدعم توجهات النظام بقمعها، والثاني ان الانتفاضات في دول الفقر الجمهورية جاءت بعد اكثر من اربعين عاما من الصبر والسكينة والتحمل الاعجازي، الى ان جاء عنصر التفجير الذي اشعل أوارها ونسف كل المعادلات والنظريات القائمة.
عندما كنا نقول ان الفيل المصري بدأ يتحرك بعد لامبالاة طال امدها، سخر منا البعض، واعتقد اننا نبالغ في تفاؤلنا بقرب اندلاع الثورة في هذا البلد الغارق في الفساد ومصادرة الحريات والتغول في نهب ثروات فقرائه من قبل مافيا رجال الاعمال، المدعومة من قبل النظام، وها هي الايام تثبت كيف استطاع هذا الفيل اكتساح كل رموز الفساد والقهر، وتقديم رأس النظام وزبانيته الى العدالة، في محاكمة هي الأكثر حضارية في هذه المنطقة من العالم.
الأمر المؤكد ان الانتفاضة السورية غير مرشحة للتوقف قريبا، فالشعب السوري عاقد العزم على استرداد كرامته وحريته، والأمر المؤكد ايضا ان السلطات السورية ليست في وارد التراجع عن حلولها الامنية والعسكرية الدموية، وغير آبهة في الوقت نفسه بالضغوط العربية والدولية المكثفة التي تستهدفها حاليا من مختلف الجهات.
ما يمكن استنتاجه من خلال رصد تطورات الوضع في سورية والمنطقة، هو اننا نقف امام تحشيد واستقطاب طائفيين، قد يتطوران الى حرب اقليمية واسعة بتحريض خارجي، وادوات عربية واسلامية محلية، اذا لم يعِ النظام السوري خطورة الطريق الذي يسير فيه، ويعالج الامور بحكمة، بعيدا عن السياسات التي تنطوي على الكثير من العناد والعجرفة.
احد المتحدثين باسم النظام السوري فاجأنا بالامس عندما اماط اللثام وبصورة فجة، عن إمكانية الانزلاق الى هذه الهاوية الطائفية، اثناء لقاء اجرته معه محطة ‘العربية’ الفضائية في برنامجها ‘بانوراما’،عندما قال إن دول الخليج تستضيف مؤتمرات للمعارضة السورية على اراضيها، وتطلق فضائيات تحرّض طائفيا ضد سورية، وحذر، او بالاحرى، هدد، بأن بلاده تستطيع القيام بالشيء نفسه، وتحرك الاقليات، او الجماعات الشيعية في الدول الخليجية ضد انظمتها، ولكنها امتنعت عن ذلك حتى الآن بسبب التزام قيادتها بالمنطلقات القومية والفكر العلماني المناهض للطائفية بأشكالها كافة.
***
التحذير خطير، ورسالة مقصودة، فلا احد يتحدث عبر الفضائيات من الناطقين باسم النظام دون تنسيق مسبق مع مرجعياته في معظم الحالات، ان لم يكن كلها. فالنظام في سورية ما زال متماسكا، وان كان قد انهك من قبل طرقات مطرقة الاحتجاجات الموجعة، فلم نسمع حتى الآن عن اي انشقاقات مهمة في سلكه الدبلوماسي او السياسي، على غرار ما حدث في دول اخرى مثل اليمن وليبيا. ولكن هذا لا يعني انه في الوقت الذي فقد فيه الكثير من شرعيته بفعل اندلاع المظاهرات والاحتجاجات في معظم المدن والبلدات، باستثناء مركزين رئيسيين هما حلب ودمشق، ما زال يملك بعض الاوراق المرعبة والتحالفات التي لا يمكن التقليل من شأنها.
السلطات السورية تشتكي من وجود بعض الجماعات المسلحة التي تطلق النار على قواتها، وهناك ادلة على صحة بعض التقارير في هذا الخصوص، وهذا امر متوقع على اي حال، فعندما تتعرض المدن واهلها لهجمات دموية من قبل قوات الامن والجيش، فمن غير المستغرب ان يلجأ بعض الافراد الى السلاح دفاعا عن النفس، فلكل قاعدة شواذ، ولكن الغالبية الساحقة من الاحتجاجات سلمية الطابع، والغالبية الساحقة من الشهداء هم من المدنيين العزل.
ما نخشاه ان تتطور الاوضاع الى حرب اهلية طائفية، خاصة ان جهات عديدة تدفع باتجاهها وبقوة هذه الايام، داخلية وخارجية، وهذه الحرب لو اندلعت لن تحرق سورية فقط، وانما المنطقة بأسرها. فهل تتعظ السلطات السورية، وتوقف مجازرها لوقف هذا السيناريو المرعب قبل حدوثه.. وتفسح المجال للاصلاحات التي تتحدث عنها دون ان نراها.. نأمل ذلك؟.

August 8th, 2011, 4:45 am

 

MNA said:

Tara @330
“Tara still look here and there for evidence otherwise for lack of HA involvement. But she is also losing hope.”

Don’t worry Tara, this is the 2nd stage of your journey.
1- Iran is Evil
2- HA is Evil
3- Israel is THE friend

August 8th, 2011, 5:04 am

 

Aboud said:

The comments from the menhebaks have been truly pathetic. Instead of insightful and thoughtful analysis on the repercussions of the Saudi stand, we hear irrelevant whines about aspects of Saudi society.

So, if women could drive in Saudi Arabia, would junior pay more attention? Italy also withdrew its ambassador, and I believe it is an open society, the kind the menhebaks *claim* to want. Or are the menhebaks going to pathetically whine that the Roman legions looted and raped conquered people, so Berlusconi should “stop throwing rocks in a glass house”.

The fact is, the Baathists are just not equal to the events around them. They do not have the capacity for analysis and self inspection that a proper navigation of current events demand. The issue isn’t whether Saudi society allows women to drive or now. The menhebaks would turn on anyone who criticized in any way, shape or form the head donkey in Damascus.

I mean, what would the reaction of the trumpets here be if the Pope himself told junior to rein in his dogs.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/europe/08/07/syria.pope/index.html

Let’s see how “open minded” and “Christian loving” you people are now.

@439 Alas, tears of rage break my fast. I’ll save yours 🙂 I love seeing how I dominate your every waking moments LOL! 🙂 🙂 🙂

@441 Khaled “If you guys accept Abu Bakr, Omar and Otnman as righful Caliphs, then all our quarrels and troubles will stop. ”

Save your breath, these people are still obsessed over who should have succeeded Mohamad over 1400 years ago. It’s pathetic.

August 8th, 2011, 5:10 am

 

Aboud said:

In all honesty, the comments from the menhebaks have been truly pathetic. Instead of insightful and thoughtful analysis on the repercussions of the Saudi stand, we hear irrelevant whines about aspects of Saudi society.

So, if women could drive in Saudi Arabia, would junior pay more attention? Italy also withdrew its ambassador, and I believe it is an open society, the kind the menhebaks *claim* to want. Or are the menhebaks going to pathetically whine that the Roman legions looted and raped conquered people, so Berlusconi should “stop throwing rocks in a glass house”.

The fact is, the Baathists are just not equal to the events around them. They do not have the capacity for analysis and self inspection that a proper navigation of current events demand. The issue isn’t whether Saudi society allows women to drive or now. The menhebaks would turn on anyone who criticized in any way, shape or form the head donkey in Damascus.

I mean, what would the reaction of the trumpets here be if the Pope himself told junior to rein in his dogs.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/europe/08/07/syria.pope/index.html

Let’s see how “open minded” and “Christian loving” you people are now.

@439 Alas, tears of rage break my fast. I’ll save yours 🙂 I love seeing how I dominate your every waking moments LOL! 🙂 🙂 🙂

August 8th, 2011, 5:13 am

 

Aboud said:

Khaled @441 These people are still obsessed over who should have ruled a tiny patch of desert 1400 years ago. It’s pathetic.

August 8th, 2011, 5:15 am

 

Aboud said:

@438 Majed

“Jumblat was in Turkey, met with officials, returned to praise Turkey, King Abdullah statement”

Wow, if Jumblat is against junior, then the Baathists are truly doomed 🙂 The man is the weathervane of the Middle East.

August 8th, 2011, 5:19 am

 

MNA said:

Abood @ 391

“Norman, if Hizbollah were really so *stupid* as to send its thugs to Syria, then it destroyed itself.”

If, Abood, a big big IF.

August 8th, 2011, 5:27 am

 

Aboud said:

MAN @448 Keep calm. Let us wait to see the report. Although it doesn’t sound too good for the Iranian proxy.

August 8th, 2011, 5:31 am

 

MNA said:

ABUGHASSAN @ 412

From Damascus, I 100% agree with your summary.

August 8th, 2011, 5:48 am

 

MNA said:

Abooud @ 449,

A report by who? UN? Who cares for their report.

August 8th, 2011, 5:50 am

 

Aboud said:

@451 MNA.

Interesting. Apparently you’ve already made up your mind that the report isn’t credible. Based on what exactly? Have you read the report? Are you privy to its details?

We Arabs love to quote UN resolutions and reports when criticizing Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. But apparently, when it comes to criticizing junior’s allies, the UN suddenly lacks credibility.

Tell me MNA, what organization does, in your eyes, have the credibility to issue judgement on whether Hizbollah did indeed send its thugs to kill Syrian soldiers? Does such an organization even exist?

August 8th, 2011, 6:21 am

 

MNA said:

Aboud @ 452,

Not aware of such an organization, but I would be open to a partial one if it exists. However, UN is a non starter.

August 8th, 2011, 6:35 am

 

Aboud said:

MNA, in that case the Syrian government should ignore all UN reports past, present and future, including the one that blamed Israel for the majority of the cease fire violations on the Golan inbetween 1960 and 1967.

August 8th, 2011, 6:52 am

 

Sheila said:

To #416. Darryl,

Regarding the thread about discrimination in Syria:

“The discrimination at the Ottomans times was greatest against Alawites first then the Christians.” I think if you were a Christian, you would disagree, but let us agree that both minorities were dicriminated against horribly.

Your assessment of the Abdul-Nasser era is echoed by many. I do not really have a strong opinion about that era, but in general terms, I agree with you about the ruining of the Syrian economy and his “useless speeches”.

Where I disagree with you strongly is your claim that thanks to Hafez Alassad, Syria is a strong country today.” Do you know who fashioned Syria to be what it is today?I am sorry, but this should be a condemnation not a word of praise for Hafez. He could actually write the book in how to destroy a nation. If you want to look at the history of “benevolent dictators”, let us look at the case of Franco in Spain. He took over Spain out of a civil war. A brutal one that destroyed the nation. When he died, Spain was one of the top ten most industrialized nations in the world. He was brutal, he was ruthless, but he was working for the improvement of his country. I do not know how we can compare that to our Hafez. Syria in the 60s was a lot better than Syria when Hafez died. I do not care if he were Alawii, sunni, catholic, druz or anything else, all I can say with certainty is that he did not care for anything except his seat. Please Darryl it was not just about that he made “some mistakes”. Belive me when I say that I really truly do not care about his religious affiliation.

Look at countries with good governance. Look at India, China, Malaysia. These are countries that have 1000% more diversity than Syria and a 1000% more complicated ethinicities than Syria. With good governance, they are working on improving their countries. Where is Syria today?. At the bottom of the barrel. This is not because of Syrians, their complexities, their lack of education ..etc. It is simply due to lack of good governance. Look at Syrians who live outside the country. I rest my case.

Finally, I want you to know that this problem is not the Alawiis fault. It is Alassad family and their thugs fault. Just because he is Alawii does make the entire community responsible for his actions.

August 8th, 2011, 10:08 am

 

abughassan said:

I do not think I can have a meaningful conversation with anybody who wants to tell me what to say and ask me to choose sides,etc..
on a personal note,my family has a lot to gain from a less corrupt and more free system because they are skilled professionals who were not given a fair chance since they are not “connected”.
I will continue to report what I know regardless if that pleases or angers some. Dair Alzour is another example of why Bashar needs to leave,Khalid. I hope your blood stops boiling because the temp is 41 in Damascus.I do not need any instructions about how to respond to the death of my fellow Syrians.the focus should be on changing the regime and stopping the bloodshed not finding new ways to increase divisions in Syria and labeling people according to their religious and political beliefs.

August 8th, 2011, 10:51 am

 

mjabali said:

Mr. Aboud comment #

You said: “In all honesty, the comments from the menhebaks have been truly pathetic. Instead of insightful and thoughtful analysis on the repercussions of the Saudi stand, we hear irrelevant whines about aspects of Saudi society.”

Mr. aboud hold your horses, take it easy. One can be anti regime and also hateful of the Saudis and their dirty role. Nothing good ever came out of Saudia Arabia to the world.

Calling other people ideas pathetic does not help any discourse.

They say in Arabic: التعميم علامة الجهل/Generalization is a sign of ignorance.

What you deemed “irrelevant whine” are the crux of the matter. Who are you to decide what is important and what is not? This is a forum where ideas are discussed. Have you heard of democracy and exchange of ideas?

AS for whining, all I see on Syria Comment is your repeated whines over and over and over.

August 8th, 2011, 11:30 am

 

Khalid Tlass said:

@Abu Ghassan – Well, we are offended by your doible standards. While people are being killed in the name of alw and roder, you post fictitious stories about “arned gangs” all taken from dubious sources. You are yet to provide any strong evidence about “armed gangs”. Do you know, that by peddling this “armed gangs” theory you are actually providing a rough justification for the violence crackdown, and by extension, to the deaths of civilans ?

You claim there is a danger to Syria from “poltical Islam”. Yet you praise Hizbullah and the “Islamic Republic” of Iran while ignoring their Islamist credentials. You criticise KSA on the account of women and minority rights (justifiably so), yet overlook these when it comes to Iran. Are you sure you’re not some sort of double-agent ?

August 8th, 2011, 11:35 am